Black People : One in Four American Children under 6 Live in Poverty

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Sep 25, 2011.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Study: Nearly 1 in 4 Children Under 6 Live in Poverty in the United States A new study reveals the number of children living in poverty in the United States has climbed to 15.7 million, an increase of 2.6 million since the beginning of the recession in 2007. According to researchers from the Carsey Institute at the University of New Hampshire, nearly one in four children under the age of six now live in poverty.

    http://www.democracynow.org/2011/9/23/headlines#7
     
  2. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Food security is becoming a very serious issue in America.
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Exaclty, since a wolf is watching the hen house
    SWING LOW, REVOLVING DOOR

    Monsanto’s man Taylor returns to FDA in food-czar role





    • [​IMG]

    8 JUL 2009 2:04 PM
    [​IMG]Michael Taylor
    In a Tuesday afternoon press release, the FDA announced that Michael Taylor, a former Monsanto executive, had joined the agency as "senior advisor to the commissioner." If the title is vague, the portfolio (pasted from the press release) is substantial--a kind of food czar of the Food and Drug Administration:

    • Assess current food program challenges and opportunities
    • Identify capacity needs and regulatory priorities
    • Develop plans for allocating fiscal year 2010 resources
    • Develop the FDA's budget request for fiscal year 2011
    • Plan implementation of new food safety legislation
    Taylor's new position isn't his first in government. He's a veteran apparatchik who has made an art of the role-swapping dance between the food industry and the agencies that regulate it. (The FDA's press release highlights his government service while delicately omitting his Monsanto daliances.) In her 2002 book Food Politics, the nutritionist and food-industry critic Marion Nestle describes him like this (quote courtesy of La Vida Locavore):http://www.grist.org/article/2009-07-08-monsanto-FDA-taylor
     
  4. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    As reported by Manufacturing and Technology News (September 20, 2011) the Quarterly Census of Employment and Wages reports that in the last 10 years, the US lost 54,621 factories, and manufacturing employment fell by 5 million employees. Over the decade, the number of larger factories (those employing 1,000 or more employees) declined by 40 percent. US factories employing 500-1,000 workers declined by 44 percent; those employing between 250-500 workers declined by 37 percent, and those employing between 100-250 workers shrunk by 30 percent. http://www.manufacturingnews.com/
    These losses are net of new start-ups. Not all the losses are due to offshoring. Some are the result of business failures.
    US politicians, such as Buddy Roemer, blame the collapse of US manufacturing on Chinese competition and “unfair trade practices.” However, it is US corporations that move their factories abroad, thus replacing domestic production with imports. Half of US imports from China consist of the offshored production of US corporations.
    The wage differential is substantial. According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, as of 2009, average hourly take-home pay for US workers was $23.03. Social insurance expenditures add $7.90 to hourly compensation and benefits paid by employers add $2.60 per hour for a total labor compensation cost of $33.53.
    In China as of 2008, total hourly labor cost was $1.36, and India’s is within a few cents of this amount. Thus, a corporation that moves 1,000 jobs to China saves saves $32,000 every hour in labor cost.These savings translate into higher stock prices and executive compensation, not in lower prices for consumers who are left unemployed by the labor arbitrage.
    Republican economists blame “high” US wages for for the current high rate of unemployment. However, US wages are about the lowest in the developed world. They are far below hourly labor cost in Norway ($53.89), Denmark ($49.56), Belgium ($49.40), Austria ($48.04), and Germany ($46.52). The US might have the world’s largest economy, but its hourly workers rank 14th on the list of the best paid. Americans also have a higher unemployment rate. The “headline” rate that the media hypes is 9.1 percent, but this rate does not include any discouraged workers or workers forced into part-time jobs because no full-time jobs are available

    http://www.infowars.com/america-and-europe-saving-the-rich-and-losing-the-economy/
     
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