Black History Culture : ON THIS DAY (1966) HUEY NEWTON AND BOOBY SEAL FOUNDED THE BLACK PANTHERS

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by RAPTOR, Oct 15, 2012.

  1. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    "The Black Panther Party for Self-Defense was founded in October, 1966, in Oakland, California by Huey P. Newton and Bobby Seale. The name was shortened to the Black Panther Party (BPP) and it began spreading eastward through the Black urban ghetto colonies across country.

    In the summer of '68, David Brothers established a BPP branch in Brooklyn, New York, and a few months later Lumumba Shakur set up a branch in Harlem, New York. i joined the Harlem BPP in the fall of '68 and served as its Finance Officer until arrested on April 2, 1969 in the Panther 21 Conspiracy case which was the opening shot in the government's nationwide attack on the BPP. Moving westward, Police Departments in each city made military raids on BPP offices or homes in Philadelphia, Chicago, Newark, Omaha, Denver, New Haven, San Diego, Los Angeles, and other cities, murdering some Panthers and arresting others.

    Read more:
    http://hiphopnews24-7.com/forum/top...ton-and-booby-seal-founded-the-black-panthers
     
  2. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    This was a volatile and powerful time for Black people...resembling much to the tune of a revolution. Gives me goose bumps recalling the era. I was young and dumb at the time but the BPP ignited a fire in my brain and filled it with possibilities that I never knew would ever exist for Black people in America.

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    Yeah, women were in the Panther movement too standing side-by-side to our Black men!!

    Some might disagree but I think we owe a lot to the BPP in terms of waking us up as a people and for many of us, with a spirit of self-love and self-determination on many levels. It was a frightening time because we had been in bondage, mentally, for so long and weren't accustomed to fighting back, against oppression in an overt way. The BPP changed that. The air was crackling with a strong desire to break free as it had been building up like steam in a covered pot for a very long time. So many Black voices were on the political/social scene at that time, speaking about different ways to achieve equality...some through non-violent means, others by any means necessary. The BPP was just as much about doing as they were about talking, and they were demonstrating how we could be a supportive and self-sustaining community. They were more about taking destiny in your own hands; doing for self and not waiting for the "white man" to do anything for us. Not all Black folk chose to "leave the plantation" during that time and support the BPP. Many were frightened of the BPP, and didn't want white people to be mad at them for standing up and speaking out about racism. So they chose to stay "on the plantation" so to speak and watch...not wanting to be labeled a radical so they chose the passive route to "freedom."
     
  3. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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  4. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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  5. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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  6. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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  7. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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  8. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    All I can say is, those images speak very loudly about the times, over 40 years ago. "Say it loud, I'm Black and I'm Proud," became the mantra of the day for Black people who protested against racism and fought for equality. Straightening combs were put away in a drawer or thrown away completely. Picks and Afro-Sheen became the new "must have." And really, when you think about the struggles of Black people back then, were they different than what we are struggling for today? But people were different then, much different than we are today. Black people seemed more ready and willing to take great risks of their personal safety to fight for what they believed in as a race of people. We have way MORE information available to us today than we had back then. We know more now than we ever imagined possible 40 years ago. To a large degree, we're more educated and have a wealthier class than we could have ever hoped for. But we're less unified today than, do I dare say, when we were enslaved...even during the Jim Crow era. We have greater "freedom" or at least, liberties today, yet we seem more disenfranchised than ever before. Likened to a slave uprising, we won some battles 40 years ago but did we lose the war? Something is wrong with this picture. :(
     
  9. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

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  10. info-moetry

    info-moetry STAFF STAFF

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    Peace

    Much respect to the BPP, the children of the one we humbly refer to as Malcolm.
     
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