Black Poetry : On the color brown...

Discussion in 'Black Poetry - Get Your Flow On!' started by Ikoro, Sep 5, 2006.

  1. Ikoro

    Ikoro Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Dedicated to Sister Spicybrown and Sister Blacklioness
    For you have both inspired in me strong emotions.
    Many of my people
    Who I so dearly love
    Seem to think
    That they are above
    Me, in some way or another.
    But there are many who call me a brother
    Even though they know my mother
    - Is white.

    How will you give
    The name brother to my father
    And then call
    His offspring a bother?
    If he truly is in the struggle...?

    For, surely, the tree cannot despise the root,
    Nor the fruit the tree.
    I have realized this long ago,
    Will you deny you are the same as me?

    My skin might
    Indeed be light brown,
    A color I know
    Makes you frown.
    But hate me and my kind,
    And there will be so many more that wish to keep us down.

    The bastard children
    Of the melanin dominant race,
    They have ancestors
    That came from the very same place,
    As you.

    The reason you hate me
    Is the reason I used to cry and hate my skin.
    This is how they play us, but I saw past it
    And saw you were my next of kin.

    Hate me and you hate yourself,
    But understand your hatred has no basis.
    The very reason I write this poem,
    Is because I truly believe not only the white man can be a racist.

    :crying:

    ~Ikoro

    Brother/Sister Keita wrote, in another thread:
     
  2. spicybrown

    spicybrown Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Peace...

    Good Morning Brother Ikoro. I was truly moved by your poem. I see you flow just like me...rhyme and reason:).

    You said a mouthful here. I have ran across a heap of contradictive/hypocritical folks on this site, as far as their regards to what/who is Black. Don't sweat it. I, too, have had my "Black VIP" pass revoked because I was unwilling to drink of the bitter water of exclusion because of "other" infusion. LOL...and what's sad is, I am as Black as 9:00pm. Keep your head up, identify as you please. Folks can not revoke the Blackness that runs strong in your blood...nor your Black state of mind. The silly rhetoric is becoming tiring, and has no REAL factual basis. Although I don't agree that Blacks have the power to exercise racism; I do believe that their hatred toward folks who share a portion of THEIR bloodline is borderline cynical. Anyhoo...I enjoy reading your posts.

    Beautiful heartfelt flow Brother:spinstar:.

    :shades:

    :picture:
     
  3. Blaklioness

    Blaklioness Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Ikoro,

    My feelings on this issue have never been about hating you or anyone else. It has been about a passion for Black empowerment and seeing Black people recover our lost dignity. That will only happen from a place of honesty....as hurtful and painful as that will be. Racism is about power. It is not only about power, it is about the willful and forceable use of that power in whatever way to seek privilege and a 'supreme' status over another racial group. What Black people have you encountered, including me, are in such a position? MOST Black people, due to our training, have done just the opposite.....we've treated nonblacks and mixed races as SUPERIOR to ourselves---not inferior. If I were to see you on the street, I would treat you with the same dignity as I would anyone...unless, of course, you demonstrated that you deserved otherwise. However, my willingness to do such doesn't mean I have on blinders, and it doesn't mean I owe you or anyone else access to MY dignity and identity and right to exist.

    If your father decided, as according to even your logic, that Black women weren't not suitable mates, why would I then call him my brother? Where's the logic and justice in embracing him and what he stands for?

    Peace to you.
     
  4. Ikoro

    Ikoro Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My father is today married to a sister. A strong sister from the continent was suitable for him in the end, after all, he is a strong elder brother from the continent. Because one chooses a partner that is non-black, does that mean that one deems all blacks as unsuitable partners? Or could it have been, sister Blacklioness, that when my father arrived in Norway in the 70's, there -were- no sisters to approach?

    *sigh*

    This is turning into a rather personal and bickering discussion. Let us refrain from starting something unintelligent.

    It sounds dangerously as if you want us to move, not just away from treating ourselves inferior, but -towards- seeking supreme status over other racial groups. I advocate equality, so I must say that if this be the case, I do not agree. But it is no matter.

    Let it suffice to say that we are of different oppinions (and that I do not fully respect what I believe to be yours), and leave it at that. I harbor no unintelligent feelings towards you, Sister Blacklioness, even if I am not, in your eyes, a brother.

    Kujichagulia.

    ~Ikoro

    ps.: Thank you ever so much Sister Spicybrown, for your comments on the poetry. I am honoured to be compared to a poet such as yourself. Also, I respect your oppinion and what you say. I am blessed to have met you here, thank you for your radiant beauty, it glows strong, all the way across the ocean to this cold, desolate land of the northern-most Caucasians. Your name will always be capitalized with respect and reverence when I write and think it. Asante sana, sister.
     
  5. PatriceCQueen

    PatriceCQueen Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I am not sure what to say


    I wish this was a thread instead


    Well I like the write .... I think it evokes a lot and therefore is doing it s job

    What the lighter skin black faces is the same as the darker skin when they are percieved by community to have too many white people in their family. Where i come from though I was light in color in the area i lived I was the darker one and worthy of no rights not only for the color of my skin but the history of my family. I think whenver possible we have to embrace our heritage and as I get older i keep getting darker. A few months ago a dark skinned black man stated he hated light skin people like me cause we think we are better than others. I laughed cause my whole life i thought everyone thought i was too dark it was weird being accused of being on the other side. Sometimes people respond to us nto because of us but becuase of where they are coming from and they respond to old angst. Let us not blame them, instead let us be our best selves and disolve the myths. They and we are equally victims of our mutual history. We all have swallowed, inhaled and digested racism. it will take a great effort to not continously agitate the wound branded on us without any formal opportunity to heal.

    We must be accepting of all of us and not use opportunity to further abuse each other. Some times it is about choice and opportunity and other times it is with deliberateness whom we choose or accept as our mates.

    People can make choices and all need to be honest as to why we make the choices conciously and unconciously.

    This is a poem and we ought to be able to respond to it as a poem in the poetry forum .... Maybe use the thread for a a discussion if we want that too.

    Peace

    have you been around long

    Patrice
     
  6. Ikoro

    Ikoro Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you, and much appreciation for feedback, Sister Patrice. The thread that sparked the poem is here:

    http://destee.com/forums/showthread.php?t=44278

    Please, have a look.

    I have been around for a month or two I think? Been looking at the forums for quite some time though, just registered a month ago.

    ~Ikoro
     
  7. Khasm13

    Khasm13 STAFF STAFF

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    i commend you on your stance in this matter...
    it's a serious problem that we face as black people
    because of the divisions anglo saxxons created
    to keep us lagging behind...

    but on the other hand it is my firm belief that over here in america it is practically impossible for black people to be racist. It's like calling a kid that gets his butt kicked everyday at school a bully because he finally stood up to his oppressors...that last line of your poem is hard for me to see...but other than that i enjoyed your flow greatly...

    one love
    khasm
     
  8. PatriceCQueen

    PatriceCQueen Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thanks for the link Ikoro ( I wonder what your name means) I am glad that people are responding and ofcourse we support you.

    Peace

    Patrice
     
  9. Ikoro

    Ikoro Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you all for the feedback.

    Brother Khasm, my last line was inspired by many of the events that have taken place in my life, and especially by a comment made here at the boards.

    It is no secret that many of our fullblooded peoples harbor hostile or unfriendly emotions towards those of mixed (especially half caucasian and afrikan) heritage. That said, it does not mean that all afikans (obviously) are against their existence.

    And... in a sense, I suppose you could say that afrikans cannot be racist. But as a person of mixed heritage, the behaviour I see in my people often parallels the white mans racist behaviour. Thus, the last line came about. It might have been a little strong, I admit. But I will let it stay, I felt it at the time.

    Sister Patrice, my name is a word from West Afrika (Nigeria, where I am partly from). An Ikoro-drum is a gigantic drum set up in the center of the village. It was holy, and was only to be used when something important was happening and the village needed to be gathered or when something needed to be brought to light. It is often translated as "spiritual drum".

    I choose it as my artist name after my mentor informed me of the word and it's meaning. I think it is a beautiful name, and I incorporate it strongly in my artist policy.

    Blessings.

    ~Ikoro
     
  10. PatriceCQueen

    PatriceCQueen Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I agree it is a beautiful name for a griot or poet or plainly one who speaks. My sons are born there ..... thanks for expressing yourself.

    Peace

    Patrice
     
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