Omowale Jabali : Notes from A Hieroglyphic Vocabulary to the Book of the Dead

Discussion in 'Omowale Jabali' started by Omowale Jabali, Oct 2, 2006.

  1. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Section: Vocabulary to the Theban Recension

    khem= to burn, shrine, to be ignorant, to put an end to, unknown is his name.

    khem= an ignorant man.

    khem= to overthrow, destroy.

    khemiu, khemit= overthrower, those who overthrow, destructions.

    Khemi+ the name of one of the Forty-two Judges in the Hall of Osiris.

    khema= to lay hold of, to seize and carry off.

    khemau= snatchers, seizers.

    khemenu=eitht, eighth

    Khemenu= the gods of the Company of Thoth who dwelt at hermopolis.

    Khemenu= the city of the Eight Gods, Hermopolis.

    khemt= to think, to know, to intend. is sometimes written by mistake for.

    khemt= the god of thought.

    Question:

    Where is there reference to khem, kem, kemet, khemit, etc meaning "land of the Blacks" or anything to that effect?

    If the definitions to the root form of the word "khem" is the correct spelling, this has some deeper implications for one who identifies as "Khem-etic".
     
  2. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    There are several references to,

    Kemt=the "black land", i.e. Egypt

    kem= to make an end of, to finish; black

    Also,

    Kenset=Nubia, Ta Sti="land of the bow", Nubia

    Khepsh=Kush or Habesh

    Kep-Kep=Nubia

    As one can see, the words used to describe/name "Egypt", "Kush" and "Egypt" are very much different.

    Therefore, it is inaccurate to describe the people of Kush (Khepsh) or Nubia (Kenset, Ta Sti) as "Kemetic"). And in the ancient texts a distinction definitely was made.

    Also, those who assert that the "habesha" were asiatic or outsiders, not according to the Hieroglyps. They were in fact from "Khepsh", i.e. Kush.
     
  3. ShemsiEnTehuti

    ShemsiEnTehuti Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Here is an example from An Egyptian Hieroglyphic Dictionary, Vol. II by E.A. Wallis Budge on page 787. This word "kami-t" means "books of the Black Land", or in other words, "Kemetic Literature". Hopefully I can scan the actual word for Egypt later when I get home for you. It is pretty much the same, being "Kam-t"

    http://img450.imageshack.us/img450/1406/booksoftheblacklandzn2.jpg
     
  4. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Is there another source other than Budge who establishes this while comprehensively translating other words in a similar manner?

    Surely, from reading seperate texts such as th Hieroglyphic Vocabulary to the Book of the Dead (topic of this thread) there are similar words with quite different meaning.
     
  5. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Note:

    Now the problem I have is with what I refer to as "selective utilization" of Budge's works.

    On one hand, Budge is used as a reference to prove that "kemet" means "land of the blacks" but then there is a disassociation from Budge when it comes to his credibility on other subject material.

    This leads to an inconsistency depending upon one's subjective bias.
     
  6. ShemsiEnTehuti

    ShemsiEnTehuti Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You are right. I certainly think that Budge doesn't translate everything well, but he has the most comprehensive dictionary on Kemetic words. There are a couple other authors, but their work is no where near as extensive as Budge's. I have seen many modern scholars simply take Budge as a reference to lead to the source (which is what I do), and re-translate it to compare.

    I will get you another source that isn't Budge. However, you will probably find yourself stuck trying to find many things because they simply haven't been covered by others.
     
  7. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Brother, in all respect ( and please excuse my manner of expression), I have no problem referencing Budge. Over the years I have used him quite extensively along with the works of Gerald Massey. I don't agree with some of the conclusions they reach, or with some of their statements but I can find no African source more comprehensive that their works in this area.

    What I do have problems with is the interpretation of others.

    For example, I have no problem accepting "land of the Blacks" but that is one context. What I also draw from this is that there are other words with the root "khem" which has a deeper and more profound meaning, which folks either overlook or dismiss. I won't go into detail but I have already given evidence in previous post.
     
  8. SAMURAI36

    SAMURAI36 Banned MEMBER

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    Which is why we should refrain from using Budge at all.

    This is the same man who called the Kemetians "Half-Negro Savages".

    What is your motive for utilizing his works?

    PEACE
     
  9. ShemsiEnTehuti

    ShemsiEnTehuti Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I must ask where you are getting the consonants KHM? The letters used in Kemetic script is distinctly KM for blackness and KMT to denote "Land of the Blacks". Sometimes, there is KMWT, but I have never seen KHMT or any variant with an "h". I am sure that KHM has an entirely different meaning than KM. In fact, I am looking in Budge's Hieroglyphic Dictionary right now and Khem has several different meanings, and none have anything to do with "blackness" or the Land.
     
  10. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Two of my references are Budge's 1)A Hieroglyphic Vocabulary to the Book of the Dead, 2)An Egyptian Hieroglyphic Reading Book.

    I also am cross-referencing with Diop's African Origin of Civilization and Natural Genesis and Ancient Egypt:Light of the World by Gerald Massey.

    In addition, I have researched extensively not only "hieroglphs" but Hieratic Script and Meroitic as well.
     
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