Black People : NON-HBCU univ. graduates more Black than any HBCU

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Knowledge Seed, Jun 16, 2012.

  1. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    549
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Ratings:
    +551
    ATLANTA— Georgia State University continues to lead the nation in graduating minority students, now ranking No.1 in the nation among not-for-profit institutions in awarding bachelor’s degrees to African-American students according to Diverse: Issues in Higher Education.

    With a 17 percent one-year increase, Georgia State outpaced all other non-profit colleges and universities in awarding bachelor degrees to African-American students in the magazine’s rankings of the “Top 100 Undergraduate Degree Producers.” GSU conferred 1,262 bachelor’s degrees to African-Americans in 2012, climbing past Florida A&M and North Carolina A&T State University.

    Georgia State’s overall graduation rates continue to break records and earn national accolades, thanks to innovative programs for retention and progression. Overall, the university has raised its graduation rates by 29 percentage points in the last decade, and the numbers continue to climb.

    “The latest rankings from Diverse: Issues in Higher Education again show that Georgia State is indeed a place where all students succeed,” said Georgia State University President Mark Becker. “We are extremely gratified to see our programs working and our students flourishing.”

    More info here
     
  2. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    549
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Ratings:
    +551
    Does something like this give credit to the argument that HBCUs are becoming obsolete?
     
  3. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    3,399
    Likes Received:
    2,558
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +2,564
    How do you suppose that it would?

    HBCUs represent an important lesson in history. One time in high school, a European student argued against the existence of HBCUs. I thought of his opinions, then remarked, those that aren't HBCUs are HWCU. And that's a lesson that we should not forget.

    If HBCUs graduated only one student, they still ought remain. Once we forget how we were mistreated, we're in for the whole mess all over again! See African history from ancient times until now.

    HTP
     
  4. Each1teach1

    Each1teach1 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,129
    Likes Received:
    981
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    build up the nation
    Location:
    the dirty dirty for now
    Ratings:
    +986
    Skype:
    ebnubian
    I think that there is alot to be discussed here. Being a product of an HBCU myself, I have observed the stripping of the hbcu culture, its "defunct" style of operation and how they repeatedly put money ahead of education all the while making worthless investments in expansion and upgrades, meanwhile their research centers and libraries are falling apart, under funded and dusty with few books printed in this century!!! Yes I have witnessed this first hand..Yet the football team which can barely qualify for the MEAC is considered for a new stadium...go figure...

    Many HBCU's were started as land grant institutions by whites anyway, are funded by the state and are dictated to as to how they will operate. Even some so called private institutions the few esteemed such as Howard and Spellmen were started by whites and are still run by them. It was a Rockerfeller that started spellmen by the way...smh
     
  5. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Nov 17, 2006
    Messages:
    39,356
    Likes Received:
    10,419
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Speaker/Teacher/Author
    Location:
    Dallas, TX
    Home Page:
    Ratings:
    +12,073


    In the Spirit of Sankofa,




    ... This comment along with Each1Teach1's makes this thread discussion relevant, in my opinion.



    Peace In,
     
  6. Knowledge Seed

    Knowledge Seed Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 22, 2008
    Messages:
    2,747
    Likes Received:
    549
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Atlanta, GA
    Ratings:
    +551
    I think HBCUs have some major work to do. I'm a student at GA State(the school mentioned in the article) and I'm also a graduate of community college with more than 95% of it's population consisting of Black students.

    I can say with high degree of certainty that HBCUs are failing their students. Not necessarily on the academic side (they do still graduate the lion's share of Black students) but definitely on the employment and entrepreneurship side. Also, they do very little to facilitate beneficial relationship between students and alumni.

    When I compare what I see going on at HBCUs in ATL versus what goes on at GSU, I feel bad the students at the Black schools because they're alumni isn't as strong as mine and isn't as engaged as mine. Being able to interact on an individual basis with power players - whether they are CEOs of public companies or small business owners - is powerful. It makes job hunting after graduation miniscule.

    HBCUs have graduated some illustrious (and rich) alumni. Yet, I know for a fact that GSU's (which is mostly full of no-names) alumni out-funds that of any HBCU.

    It's sad to think that more opportunity is afforded to Black students at non-HBCUs.
     
  7. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    3,399
    Likes Received:
    2,558
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +2,564
    At a park, I saw a memorial raised for a battled waged between the British and the Americans. It's from 1776 and very irrelevant to the 2012 experience. Yet, that memorial stands.

    This is what the HBCU represents; though the HBCU isn't irrelevant: As you say, it graduates the lion's share.

    We as a people ought recall that we need memorials too, lest we forget. Otherwise, for what are you, Knowledge Seed, showing Ancient Egypt? Ancient Egypt (directly) graduates less Africans in America than HBCUs do! :p
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    No, it does not.

    Let's just say, hypothetically speaking, that HBCUs become wiped out, every one of them, every college and university.

    Now, just WHERE do YOU propose that our young adults go to college? --- Cuz all of 'em sho' can't get into GA State...or Clayton State...or Kennesaw, etc...

    Many of our children have financial issues and/or academic challenges that would make attending a WHITE college impossible.

    Okay....What about "community colleges?" --- Well, again, just how many of our inner-city or rural high school graduates can attend these WHITE community colleges as well?

    Just WHERE do YOU propose that our youth go to college if there were NO MORE HBCUSs??
     
  9. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    Report: HBCUs' graduation rates misleading

    2 years ago | 4465 views | 6 [​IMG] | 41 [​IMG] | [​IMG] | [​IMG]
    By Neil Offen

    Graduation rates at historically black colleges and universities are lower than at other institutions.

    But a recent white paper from the Thurgood Marshall College Fund, a New York-based leadership organization for HBCUs, says the numbers are misleading.

    "Traditional graduation rate measures ... simply do not reflect either the unique educational challenges or significant accomplishments of HBCUs," the report states. "They do not address the unique role or longstanding mission of HBCUs."

    The report -- "Making the Grade: Improving Degree Attainment at Historically Black Colleges and Universities" -- calls for new measures "that contextualize graduation rates ... demonstrating the immense value these institutions add as they raise their students from a position of academic weakness to strength ... and taking into consideration students' socio-economic status and academic preparation."

    ....."HBCUs enroll a large proportion of part-time, transfer and low-income students as well as those who stop in and out of college due to life circumstances."

    Consequently, says the report, compiled by the fund and four presidents of HBCUs, "these students' degree completion simply doesn't register on a six-year graduation yardstick." That metric does not "capture the distance that students must travel in life to attain their degrees."

    Nationwide, only around 37 percent of students graduate from HBCUs within six years (compared with 45 percent for non-HBCUs). At NCCU, the six-year graduation rate has been around 49 percent -- still less than half of the student body and far beyond, for instance, the 85 percent rate of UNC Chapel Hill.

    Nelms recommends a "new metric" that would take into account a number of different factors, including:

    * The student's level of readiness when entering higher education. "Are they ready for collegiate success, as reflected by the rigor of courses they took in high school and their performance in those courses?" Nelms said.

    * The student's employment status. Many low-wealth students find themselves working two or three jobs while they're attending college, the chancellor pointed out.

    * The resources and expertise of the institution. "Can the institution teach students who are not where they need to be upon entry?" Nelms asked.

    *The student's pattern of attendance. Many students from low-wealth backgrounds may start and stop and start their education again, because of financial circumstance. "We need to be careful not to define a stop as a dropout," Nelms said, "because those students may eventually come back to school."
     
  10. Each1teach1

    Each1teach1 Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Apr 9, 2008
    Messages:
    1,129
    Likes Received:
    981
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    build up the nation
    Location:
    the dirty dirty for now
    Ratings:
    +986
    Skype:
    ebnubian
    I heard this sad argument in person from Micheal Eric Dyson about his OWN son no less!!! Now I agree that the colleges are not obsolete but they have certainly lost focus and vision. They are so busy trying to keep up with whites that they are falling behind in catering to the specific needs of their students and more important nation building and creating leadership (which they do none of). Getting back on point I believe that if a kid couldnt keep a B or better and doesnt have the focus of becoming a doctor, nurse, astronaut or lawyer they dont need to be in college anyway. It would be a waste of time and money. Thats just my opinion, especially when the job market is so competitive that even the best cant even get the top job it instead given to the best of the best lol. The problem is that degrees over saturate the market today and if you didnt get one in the top fields from one of the top schools you can forget about a great salary (100k or more). But you will look reluctantly toward paying that student loan which could be twice that. SMH...Im not done I have more to say I'll be back lol
     
Loading...