Black People : No dreadlocks at Black Enterprise and elsewhere

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by dustyelbow, Jul 6, 2006.

  1. dustyelbow

    dustyelbow Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Dreadlocks Don't Make the Cut
    June 23, 2006
    Black Enterprise Enforces Its Dress and Hair Code

    A couple of months ago, Susan L. Taylor, editorial director of Essence magazine, the nation's leading magazine for black women, said she had backed out of a speaking engagement at Hampton University after learning that "braids, dreadlocks and other unusual hairstyles are not acceptable" for majors in a five-year master's of business administration program at the university.

    "Perhaps the greatest challenge . . . students will face in the work world is remaining whole and true to themselves in environments that are often hostile to African-Americans. Staying connected to our community and culture is critical. Trying to transform themselves to fit into hardly welcoming environments has scarred countless numbers of Black people," Taylor said in a recommendation to university President William R. Harvey. Her sentiments later were seconded by Essence Editor Angela Burt-Murray, a Hampton alum.

    Their arguments don't wash at Black Enterprise magazine, as Mashaun Simon, the student representative to the board of the National Association of Black Journalists, found out. Simon, who attends Georgia State University, was told to cut his dreadlocks if he wanted to keep his summer internship at Black Enterprise. He said he happily complied.

    "I never wanted my hairstyle to become an issue like it has become," he told Journal-isms. "Black Enterprise is one of the most widely respected magazines in this country and my being here speaks to the talent I possess as a student journalist.

    "I am thankful to be here and blessed to have been chosen out of the many who wanted to be here. And so, I am very comfortable with the choice I made in cutting my hair. I understand what my position on the board of directors for the National Association of Black Journalists has brought to this discussion; however, at the end of the day I have to think about what is best for me and my still infant journalism career and govern myself accordingly. I have made that decision and stand by it."

    Earl G. Graves, founder of the publication, outlined his philosophy in a February 2000 "Publisher's Page" column. "Simply put, we must remove every reason – including things as superficial as our style of hair or dress – that an advertiser, an event sponsor, a subscriber, a job candidate and even a co-worker might have for not wanting to do business with us," Graves said.
    "What's alarming about the desire to subordinate traditional dress codes to personal preferences is that too often those who want to make the most radical departures are those who are the most poorly positioned, in terms of career survival and advancement, to do so: young, inexperienced black professionals who are in the vulnerable early stages of their careers. It's the equivalent of an unproven third-year player trying to enjoy the privileges accorded a 10-time All-Star."

    Read the rest here.
    ---------------------------------------------

    I really hope our YOUNG PEOPLE know what's in store for them when they want to get invovled with HIGHER ELEMENTS in the COMMUNITY.

    You have to lose something, to gain sometimes in these types of situation, I guess.
     
  2. oldiesman

    oldiesman Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    no dreadlocks...

    another thing put upon us to do business with ol massa,it's sad that in this NEW CENTURY some companies still feel threatened with the way someone wears thier hair,yes they call it dressin for success blah blah blah,but in reality it's a form of control and it's outdated it's what's in the head that counts not what's on top.
     
  3. backtoafrica

    backtoafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This isn't anything new. There have been many cases where blacks have been discriminated against for wearing natural styles. I'd do something about it.
     
  4. Agent_Jack

    Agent_Jack Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I guess he does not want to intimidate any of his white business constituents.
    Its all about a mighty dollar. If there were enough black businesses and sponsors he could break bread and build with, his whole staff would probably look like extras from the movie ROOTS.
     
  5. IfUComeSoftly

    IfUComeSoftly Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    i can say, "DAMNNN!" but i nkow when i have business dealings, 99.9999%, i put a hot comb to the fro and i make sure i dont' have braid or twists cause i know the game. and... i'm really not surprised... in matters such as these we're harder on each other then others are on us.
     
  6. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    It's no shock that many natural hair blacks with dreads are pushed out
    the corpra world is about Money and anything they feel is harmful they dismised.

    To a point a break through is on the rise .
     
  7. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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    There was a thread posted about why some blacks dis like college degreed blacks. this article is another example of the lack of back bone that so many higher priced educated blacks show.
     
  8. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    does anybody actually read BE?
     
  9. Monetary

    Monetary going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    We need to behave as if we're in the Jim Crowe days and take care of self. Trust me, the same people who won't give B.E. business now because a journalist has dreads will come and knock down the door to get to you when you are very successful and making a lot of money.

    I think we're going about it the wrong way. Get successful by doing business with our own. Watch...they'll come a running.

    An example can be seen in the movies. Once upon a time White folks wouldn't make any movies with majority Black actors. But every now and again, when someone comes along and makes a lot of money by doing what they wouldn't do, they give attention to it. Spike Lee and John Singleton come to mind.

    Trust me. It can work.
     
  10. uplift19

    uplift19 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I'm glad the truth is out

    I have been telling people for YEARS that Earl Graves felt this way because I heard it from his own mouth. I attended Howard University my freshman year of college. In the School of Business, we were broken into teams of 4 or 5 people. My team had the opportunity to meet with Earl Graves at a luncheon with just us. He plainly told a marketing major that if she wanted to wear a 'dishiki' and 'dreadlocks' she could go work for the NAACP because there was no place for her at BE.

    The school of business also pushed this nonsense, telling me I would have to take my braids out of my hair if I wanted to interview with any companies, and that business women should wear short skirts to look 'professional'

    Needless to say, I left HU to attend another institution after my first year. It's ironic that we as Black people teach each other to be better slaves than any massa ever could.
     
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