Black People : Music, Math and Race

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by oldsoul, Aug 10, 2002.

  1. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    May 16, 2002
    Messages:
    1,832
    Likes Received:
    909
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Staying Alive
    Location:
    Bronzeville USA
    Home Page:
    Ratings:
    +976
    One of the great minds of the Information Age is a Nigerian American named Philip Emeagwali.
    He had to leave school because his parents couldn't pay the fees. He lived in a refugee camp during the Nigerian civil war. He won a scholarship to university and went on to invent a formula that lets computers make 3.1 billion calculations per second. Some people call him the Bill Gates of Africa.
    A BLACK MATHEMATICIAN TALKS ABOUT RACE
    by PHILIP EMEAGWALI
    Chicago. June 16, 2001
    I am normally introduced either as a mathematician or a computer scientist. But one surprising and little known fact about me is that I am also a dancer. Three years ago, I studied African dance with the Sankofa Dance Theater of Baltimore. The reason I became interested in African dance is that I found the drumming and music to be both therapeutic and invigorating. Many mathematicians, myself included, believe that music inspires their creativity and helps them solve mathematical problems. Similarly, mathematics can help you become a better musician. In fact, many musicians believe that music and mathematics have a lot in common. In an interview, Bob Dylan said that his "songs are all mathematical songs." Someone once described dancers as poets in motion. I believe that dancers are mathematicians in motion. My dance instructor always closes each lesson by explaining the cultural and historical significance of each dance. He explained to me that Sankofa is the name of a fabled African bird whose head is always turned backwards. The origin of the word is from the Akan language of Ghana, west African. "Sankofa" means "Go back and retrieve." In a symbolic sense, the Sankofa bird is "facing the past." It symbolizes the African adage "Always remember the past for therein lies the future..." In the spirit of Sankofa, I will like to begin by reflecting on the past to understand when, where and how the intellectual foundation for the Digital Age was laid. To understand where we are or where we are going or what directions we should take require that we review where we have been.
    (For more, go to www.blackland.zzn.com)
     
  2. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    69,983
    Likes Received:
    3,978
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    BUSINESS owner
    Location:
    Da~WINDY*CITY //CHICAGO
    Ratings:
    +4,178
    great read of knowledge !
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    wow. I see this got as much attention as it did the 2nd time around in '07. http://www.destee.com/forums/showthread.php?t=52094


    But, I do thank you for sharing this. I had previously read about Mr. Emeagwali and thought his story so inspiring.

    We should be learning from/about this African man's journey and be encouraged on our own.
     
  4. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    6,458
    Likes Received:
    1,282
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Author
    Location:
    Where the Niger meets the Nile
    Ratings:
    +1,290
    Sista cherry,

    It's good to see you appreciate the value of learning about our brothas. And thank you for taking the time to dig up this gem. I know it must have taken a great deal of effort to find it.
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560

    Actually, Sister River, it didn't take much effort at all.

    However, even if it had, it would have been a "labor of love" in order to unearth and bring renewed attention to this wonderful example of Black achievement which had been virtually ignored, not once, but twice.

    Moreover, I had already read of Mr. Emeagwali before but thought that his story deserved to be dusted off.
     
  6. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    6,458
    Likes Received:
    1,282
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Author
    Location:
    Where the Niger meets the Nile
    Ratings:
    +1,290
    Hey sistah cherry.

    It is an excellent article though it's not the kind of thing that generates a lot of discussion. Between the 2002 posting and the 2007 posting that's nearly a thousand views.

    Keep digging sistah. There are so many more gems the brotha has hidden in the bossom of destee.com. In fact that might be a good idea for an annual tradition where members pull up something that touched them years ago. Whaddaya say. sistah Destee?
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560

    Obviously, I agree but tis all the sadder that it's not.
     
  8. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    6,458
    Likes Received:
    1,282
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Author
    Location:
    Where the Niger meets the Nile
    Ratings:
    +1,290
    But that doesn't mean that it doesn't generate thought.
     
Loading...