Black Spirituality Religion : MOSES: THE FOUNDER OF JUDAISM...

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Aqil, Oct 23, 2001.

  1. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It has been handed down to us that the first five books of the Holy Bible (called The Pentateuch by the Greeks) were written or compiled by one of the greatest men of all time - the man called Moses. He was the founder of Judaism; the greatest of all the Israelite prophets; the deliverer of the Israelite people of Africa from the tyranny of the Egyptian Pharaoh. According to Biblical data he lived about 500 years after Abraham, and about 1,400 years before Christ. He was the lawgiving prophet; the other Israelite prophets that came after him were only followers of his system.

    Moses was an Israelite who was born in the North African country of Egypt in 1533 BC. He was brought up by Egyptians, and bore a typical Egyptian name. Moses is the name "Maose," which is commonly found on the Nile River. The Egyptian word "ms" stands for "mosu," which simply means "boy-son" (Egyptian hieroglyphics used no vowels). A number of Pharaohs are called "Ahmoses," "Tuthmoses," and "Ram(o)ses." The Bible says, "he was born of the priestly house of Levi," and was called "Moses" because the Pharaoh's daughter saved him from the waters of the Nile River. In the Hebrew language "Moses" becomes "Mosheh," meaning "drawn from water."

    The Pharaoh Ram(o)ses II had ordered that all Israelite male children be destroyed because the Israelites had grown exceedingly strong. Moses was saved by the Pharaoh's daughter.

    Here is the Biblical account:

    "Now a man from the house of Levi went and took to wife a daughter of Levi. The woman conceived and bore a son; and when she saw that he was a goodly child, she hid him three months. And when she could hide him no longer she took for him a basket made of bulrushes, and daubed it with bitumen and pitch; and she put the child in it and placed it among the reeds at the river's brink...

    And his (Moses) sister stood at a distance, to know what would be done to him. Now the daughter of Pharaoh came down to bathe at the river, and her maidens walked beside the river; she saw the basket among the reeds and sent her maid to fetch it. When she opened it she saw the child, and lo, the babe was crying. She took pity on him and said, 'This is one of the Israelite's children.' Then his (Moses) sister said to Pharaoh's daughter, 'Shall I go and call you a nurse from the Israelite women to nurse the child for you?' And the Pharaoh's daughter said to her, 'Go.' So the girl went and called the child's mother...

    And Pharaoh's daughter said to her, 'Take this child away, and nurse him for me, and I will give you your wages.' So the woman took the child and nursed him. And the child grew, and she brought him to Pharaoh's daughter, and he became her son; and she named him Moses, for, she said, 'I drew him out of the water.' "
    (Exodus 2:1-10)

    She adopted Moses, and he became her son. In this position, as the son of the great Pharaoh Ramses' daughter, he received the highest education that was possible in that wonderful land of Egypt. The Bible tells us "he was well-versed in all the wisdom of the the Egyptians." History tells us that he became a master of astrology; that he erected a great observatory at the Temple of Amun-Re, in the great Egyptian city of On (i.e., the Greek "Heliopolis").

    When his stepmother became the Queen of Egypt, Moses became the Commander-in-Chief of her Army; as such he conquered the Ethiopians and relieved Egypt from the danger of invasion. In this moment of triumph the Queen died, and a Pharaoh came to the throne "who knew not Moses," and the Bible says that "he went unto his brethren and looked on their burdens." The "call of the blood" had come; he knew he was an Israelite, a son of the priestly tribe of Levi; "he saw an Egyptian smiting one of his brethren" (Exodus 2:11); he slew the Egyptian and took refuge in the land of Midian.

    Moses was now 80 years of age (Exodus 7:7), a man of experience, great learning, and "well-versed in the wisdom of the Egyptians." Such was the man the Lord had chosen for the delivery of His people. If one could imagine the Biblical accounts of the humbling of Pharaoh by the ten plagues; the Passover night; the outward march of that multitude of men, women, children, and herds of cattle. No one but Moses, the former Commander-in-Chief of the Egyptian Army, could have organized such a march.

    The first great Passover march of the Israelites took place at the time of the Full Moon after the Vernal Equinox in Nisan, the first month of the Hebraic year (equivalent to "Easter" in the Western world), circa 1486 BC. If one looks at an atlas containing old Hebrew names, it is easy to see that Moses skillfully led this great multitude of people toward the most fordable part of the Red Sea (i.e., the northern end of the Gulf of Suez), at a place called "Pi-Hahiroth," as stated in Exodus 14:2.

    Moses was well-acquainted with this part of the country, having passed this way on his flight to Midian and in his return to Egypt. He had observed the influx of the tides, and by his astrological calculations he knew that the southeastern monsoon winds would arrive at a certain date to aid in his plans. This is the east wind mentioned in the English version of the Bible; in the Septuagint (the Greek version of the Old Testament) it is called a strong southern wind. But in both translations the poetic description is the same:

    "And the Lord caused the sea to go back by a strong east wind all that night and made the sea dry land and the waters were divided." (Exodus 14:21)... and the children of Israel walked upon dry land in the midst of the sea.

    The Israelites had left secretly by night, and when the Pharaoh learned of their flight he pursued them with his armies and was drowned in the Red Sea. Moses led the Israelites across the dry bed very quickly, because it was the time of the ebb tide, and the sea was receding. But when Pharaoh's army reached the sea, it was the time of the high tide, and in their zeal to overtake the Israelites, they took no notice of it, and at once jumped into the sea. It seemed that being heavily equipped with huge chariots and other heavy armaments, the progress of Pharaoh's army was greatly reduced, so that while they were yet in the midst of the sea, the high tide returned and they were all drowned.

    After this came that mysterious 40 years of wandering in the desert, which was planned and designed to purge the Israelites from the teachings and customs they had partook of during their 400 years of residence among the people of Egypt. If one again looks at any Old Testament map, one cannot help but to think how short the distance would have been had Moses led his people directly across the peninsula to Palestine. Instead, they were made to traverse the whole peninsula of Sinai before they were allowed to turn their faces toward "The Promised Land."

    During that 40 years of wandering a generation had passed away. Wisely and by design the older generation, which had been contaminated by their long sojourn in Egypt, had been "gathered to their fathers." Their place had been taken by the fresh blood of their sons and daughters - a younger generation more fitted to understand the teachings of the Great Lawgiver; more fitted as a chosen people later on to hand down to posterity the pages of the Holy Bible, that sacred volume which was destined to illuminate and influence the entire civilized world...
     
  2. imhotep35

    imhotep35 Active Member MEMBER

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    Moses - rescued Israelites

    I take a small exception with the title given to Moses. The patriarchs - Abraham, Isaac and Jacob preceeded Moses by more than 400-600 years. Jacob, the grandson of Abraham was given the name Israel - symbolizing the beginning of Israel, and the twelve tribes. Moses was chosen to lead the liberation of Israel from 400 years in slavery in Egypt. A paltry 70 folk were left after a famine to be rescued by Joseph - the brother sold into slavery. Moses was at the ripe age of 80 when he received his marching orders to go with his brother, Aaron, to seek the release of Israel from the Pharoah.
    Chronologically, Jacob becomes the founding father of Judaism, I think. Moses was the "emancipator"
     
  3. dnommo

    dnommo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Abraham, Isaac and Jacob, known as the Patriarchs, are both the physical and spiritual ancestors of Judaism. They founded the religion now known as Judaism, and their descendants are the Jewish people. Of course, technically, it is incorrect to refer to Abraham, Isaac and Jacob as Jews, because the terms "Jew" and "Judaism" were not used generally to refer to this nation until hundreds of years after their time; nevertheless, for convenience I will use these terms.

    The history is derived from written Torah, Talmud, Midrash and other sources. Modern scholars question the existence of the Patriarchs and the historical accuracy of this information; however, it is worth noting that scholars also questioned the existence of Babylonia... until archaeologists found it.


    Moses was the greatest prophet, leader and teacher that Judaism has ever known. In fact, one of Rambam's 13 Principles of Faith is the belief that Moses's prophecies are true, and that he was the greatest of the prophets. He is called "Moshe Rabbeinu," that is, Moses, Our Teacher/Rabbi. Interestingly, the numerical value of "Moshe Rabbeinu" is 613: the number of mitzvot that Moses taught the Children of Israel! He is described as the only person who ever knew G-d face-to-face (Deut. 34:10) and mouth-to-mouth (Num. 12:8), which means that G-d spoke to Moses directly, in plain language, not through visions and dreams, as G-d communicated with other prophets.

    Moses was born on 7 Adar in the year 2368 from Creation (circa 1400 BCE), the son of Amram, a member of the tribe of Levi, and Yocheved, Levi's daughter (Ex. 6:16-20). Unlike the heroes of many other ancient cultures, Moses did not have a miraculous birth. Amram married Yocheved, and she conceived, and she gave birth (Ex. 2:1-2). The only unusual thing about his birth is Yocheved's advanced age: Yocheved was born while Jacob and his family were entering Egypt, so she was 130 when Moses was born. His father named him Chaver, and his grandfather called him Avigdor, but he is known to history as Moses, a name given to him by Pharaoh's daughter.

    The name "Moses" comes from a root meaning "take out," because Moses was taken out of the river (Ex. 2:10). Some modern scholars point out that the root M-S-S in Egyptian means "son of" as in the name Ramases (son of Ra), but it is worth noting that Moses's name in Hebrew is M-Sh-H, not M-S-S. According to one Jewish source, Pharaoh's daughter actually named him Minios, which means "drawn out" in Egyptian, and the name Moshe (Moses) was a Hebrew translation of that name, just as a Russian immigrant named Ivan might change his name to the English equivalent, John.

    Moses was born in a very difficult time: Pharaoh had ordered that all male children born to the Hebrew slaves should be drowned in the river (Ex. 1:22). Yocheved hid Moses for three months, and when she could no longer hide him, she put him in a little ark and placed it on the river where Pharaoh's daughter bathed (Ex. 2:2-3). Pharaoh's daughter found the child and had compassion on him (Ex. 2:6). At the suggestion of Moses's sister Miriam, Pharaoh's daughter hired Yocheved to nurse Moses until he was weaned (Ex. 2:7-10). Yocheved instilled in Moses a knowledge of his heritage and a love of his people that could not be erased by the 40 years he spent in the antisemitic court of Pharaoh.

    Little is known about Moses's youth. The biblical narrative skips from his adoption by Pharaoh's daughter to his killing of an Egyptian taskmaster some 40 years later. One traditional story tells that when he was a child, sitting on Pharaoh's knee, Moses took the crown off of Pharaoh's head and put it on. The court magicians took this as a bad sign and demanded that he be tested: they put a brazier full of gold and a brazier full of hot coals before him to see which he would take. If Moses took the gold, he would have to be killed. An angel guided Moses's hand to the coal, and he put it into his mouth, leaving him with a life-long speech impediment (Ex. 4:10).

    Although Moses was raised by Egyptians, his compassion for his people was so great that he could not bear to see them beaten by Pharaoh's taskmasters. One day, when Moses was about 40 years old, he saw an Egyptian beating a Hebrew slave, and he was so outraged that he struck and killed the Egyptian (Ex. 2:11-12). But when both his fellow Hebrews and the Pharaoh condemned him for this action, Moses was forced to flee from Egypt (Ex. 2:14-15).

    He fled to Midian, where he met and married Zipporah, the daughter of a Midianite priest (Ex. 2:16-21). They had a son, Gershom (Ex. 2:22). Moses spent 40 years in Midian tending his father-in-law's sheep. A midrash tells that Moses was chosen to lead the Children of Israel because of his kindness to animals. When he was bringing the sheep to a river for water, one lamb did not come. Moses went to the little lamb and carried it to the water so it could drink. Like G-d, Moses cared about each individual in the group, and not just about the group as a whole. This showed that he was a worthy shepherd for G-d's flock.

    I'm sure everyone knows what happened next - if you haven't read the book, then you've certainly seen the movie. G-d appeared to Moses and chose him to lead the people out of Egyptian slavery and to the Promised Land (Ex. Chs. 3-4). With the help of his brother Aaron, Moses spoke to Pharaoh and triggered the plagues against Egypt (Ex. Chs. 4-12). He then led the people out of Egypt and across the sea to freedom, and brought them to Mount Sinai, where G-d gave the people the Torah and the people accepted it (Ex. Chs. 12-24).

    G-d revealed the entire Torah to Moses. The entire Torah includes the first five books of the Bible (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy) that Moses himself wrote as G-d instructed him. It also includes all of the remaining prophecies and history that would later be written down in the remaining books of scripture, and the entire Oral Torah, the oral tradition for interpreting the Torah, that would later be written down in the Talmud. Moses spent the rest of his life writing the first five books, essentially taking dictation from G-d.

    After Moses received instruction from God about the Law and how to interpret it, he came back down to the people and started hearing cases and judging them for the people, but this quickly became too much for one man. Upon the advice of his father-in-law, Yitro, Moses instituted a judicial system (Ex. 18:13-26).

    Moses was not perfect. Like any man, he had his flaws and his moments of weakness, and the Bible faithfully records these shortcomings. In fact, Moses was not permitted to enter the Promised Land because of a transgression (Deut. 32:48-52). Moses was told to speak to a rock to get water from it, but instead he struck the rock repeatedly with a rod, showing improper anger and a lack of faith (Num. 20:7-13).

    Moses died in the year 2488, just before the people crossed over into the Promised Land (Deut. 32:51). He completed writing the first five books of the Bible (Genesis, Exodus, Leviticus, Numbers and Deuteronomy) before he died. There is some dispute as to who physically wrote the last few verses of Deuteronomy: according to some, Moses wrote these last few verses from a vision of the future, but according to others, the last few verses were added by Joshua after Moses's death. In any case, these verses, like everything else in the Torah, were written by G-d, and the actual identity of the transcriber is not important.

    Moses's position as leader of Israel was not hereditary. His son, Gershom, did not inherit the leadership of Israel. Moses's chosen successor was Joshua, son of Nun (Deut. 34:9).

    Moses was 120 years old at the time that he died (Deut. 34:7). That lifespan is considered to be ideal, and has become proverbial: one way to wish a person well in Jewish tradition is to say, "May you live to be 120!"

    As important as Moses was to the Children of Israel, it is always important to remember that Moses himself was not the deliverer or redeemer of Israel. It was God who redeemed Israel, not Moses. Moses was merely God's prophet, His spokesman. The traditional text of the Pesach haggadah does not even mention Moses's name. In order to prevent people from idolatrously worshipping Moses, his grave was left unmarked (Deut. 34:6).



    This information is good and i enjoy the reads. Finally, someone comes in to respond other than read...
     
  4. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you for your enlightening discourse, dnommo...
     
  5. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Pharaoh's daughter adopted Moses, and he became her son. In this position, as the son of the great Pharaoh Ramses' daughter, he received the highest education that was possible in that wonderful land of Egypt. The Bible tells us "he was well-versed in all the wisdom of the the Egyptians." History tells us that he became a master of astrology; that he erected a great observatory at the Temple of Amun-Re, in the great Egyptian city of On (the Greek "Heliopolis").

    Re: The Exodus:

    Moses was well-acquainted with this part of the country ("Pi-Hahiroth"), having passed this way on his flight to Midian and in his return to Egypt. He had observed the influx of the tides, and by his astrological calculations he knew that the southeastern monsoon winds would arrive at a certain date to aid in his plans.
     
  6. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Israelites had left Egypt secretly by night, and when the Pharaoh learned of their flight he pursued them with his armies and was drowned in the Red Sea. Moses led the Israelites across the dry bed very quickly, because it was the time of the ebb tide, and the sea was receding. But when Pharaoh's army reached the sea, it was the time of the high tide, and in their zeal to overtake the Israelites, they took no notice of it, and at once jumped into the sea. Being heavily equipped with huge chariots and other heavy armaments, the progress of Pharaoh's army was greatly reduced, so that while they were yet in the midst of the sea, the high tide returned and they were all drowned...
     
  7. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Bible tells us "he was well-versed in all the wisdom of the the Egyptians." History tells us that he became a master of astrology; that he erected a great observatory at the Temple of Amun-Re, in the great Egyptian city of On (the Greek "Heliopolis").
     
  8. goraddy

    goraddy Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Do people really believe that these stories are true?
    Where is the evidence pointing to Moses Existence?
     
  9. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Of course they do...ask anybody... :) Moses ("Musa" in Arabic) is a prophet both in the Bible and the Qur'an...
     
  10. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    eVERYTHING WRITTEN ABOUT MOSES ISN'T TRUE. tHE EGYPTIANS USED THE WORD JEW TO REFER TO THEIR MOUNTAINS THEY SHAPED LIKE PYRAMIDS THOUSANDS OF YEARS BEFOR ABRAM WAS BORN.IS IT A COINCIDENCE THE JEWS FROM ISRAEL ADOPT THIS EGYPTIAN SYMBOL ON THEIR NATIONAL FLAG.
     
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