Pan Africanism : Moctar Tayeb, The story of a former Modern day Slave

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Sekhemu, Dec 11, 2005.

  1. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Charles Jacobs

    According to conservative estimates, twenty-seven million people today are living in human bondage around the globe. By definition, these slaves are made to work for little of no money by means of force or threat of force. in the worst case, that of chattel-slavery, people are the owned property of others and are bred and passed on through their masters.

    In Mauritania and Sudan, one finds, respectively, the most ignored and worst cases of slavery. In Mauritania, the centuries-old institution of slavery has never ended. Slave raids ceased long ago; for generations, those who are slaves constitute a caste that continues from one generation to another. Precisely because it is so much a part of the scenery, slavery in Mauritania attracts little attention; it appears to be part of the eternal order of things. But it should not be; and the fact that one generation after another is born into servitude is unacceptable.

    The sixteen-year long war in Sudan waged by northerners against the Muslims, Christians, and "Animist" in the south. It is primarily prosecuted by the National Islamic Front, the fundamentalist Muslim party that took power ten years ago ( but has been pushed aside in recent weeks). The war (Jihad) includes such atrocities as militias armed by the government of Khartoum engaging in pogrom-like raids on villages. The village men are shot, women and children are taken captive, then enslaved, branded, bred, and forcibly converted to Islam. Women chosen as concubines are genitally mutilated. The war in Sudan has claimed over two million lives-more than the conflicts in Kosovo, Bosnia, Rwanda, Burundi, Somalia and Chechnya combined. Despite the calamity, the south Sudanese have been abandoned by the west.


    Moctar Teyeb


    Eight Centuries ago, Arab Berber tribes from the north raided the villages of my ancestors, killing the men, and taking the women and children captive. We became "haratine," black Muslim slaves, who had to serve our white Arab masters, the "Bedyanes." These raides inaugurated a system of slavery in the twelfth century that continues uninterrupted today.

    As their master's property, slaves exist to oblige their masters' every need. In Mauritania, where manual labor is a shameful act, slaves cook, clean, and cultivate land. Often, slaves are given a gift or loan; they are not allowed to marry.

    Both masters and slaves in Mauritania are Muslim. The heratines are faithful Muslims and are raised to believe that serving their masters is their religious dudy, due to their "impure" black skin. The Bedyanes have taught the heratines to believe that their only hope for redemption in the hereafter is through obedience, and that "the road to heaven is under the masters' foot. They deny them the right to study the Qur'an because they are too impure for such a holy book.

    When Bedyanes want to repent, they often "donate" one of their slaves as chrarity to poor Bedyanes.This explains the otherwise bizarre sight of blind beggars being led around by their black slaves in the capital Nouakchott and other Mauritanian cities.

    Since the Mauritanian market for slaves is saturated ( everyone has enough slaves already), new ways to trade slaves has been established. In the early 1980's, seversal sheiks from Persian Gulf countries imported slave children from Mauritania. Within Mauritania, some masters hire out their slaves to companies in return for their salaries. Others rent slave to other masters in big cities. Perhaps most astonishingly, one can find slaves in the embassies of Mauritania abroad.

    Although the suffering of the heratines has lasted for many centuries, our Muslim brethren have yet to condemn the practice of slavery in Mauritania. Heratines are also dismayed at the inaction of most Western human rights groups. With the notable exception of the American Anti-Slavery Group, Headed by Charles Jacobs, most groups have ignored the plight of one million Mauritanian slaves, Some don not know, others do not care. But the silence has to be broken.

    Samuel Cotton


    As a black American, I was first surprised to find that although African governments are aware of the existence of slavery, they display no concern about the issue. Senegal, for instance, maintains good relations with Mauritania-despite the latter's enslavement of individuals from ethnic groups living in Senegal. Eventually I realized that, in contrast to African-Americans, African blacks do not see their common skin color as the basis for solidarity. African Americans became a group as a result of the oppression they experienced in the United States, leading them to identify as a group and with other blacks.

    This would lead you to assume that the experience of black Africans would resonate with that of African Americans. Sadly, this is not the case. In fact, the anti-slavery movement in the United States, is predominantly white. The silence of the NAACP and other African American organizations and groupings on an issue that is central to the African American experience is a phenomenon that has to be examined. I have several levels of explanation.

    First, there is no indication of a connection, and even respect, between African Americans and Africans. An initial brotherhood between the groups turns out to be based on a nastalgic fantasy by the Americans about Africa and it dissolves quickly.

    Secondly, many African Americans look to Islam for an alternative to their racist experience under Christianity. This set of attitudes prevents them from focusing on developments in Africa, preferring to believe that if it's Islamic, it's fine. Black American converts to Islam look to Muslims for a social model. The phenomenon of Muslims sponsoring slavery in Mauritania and Sudan causes cognitive dissonance which they are unable to deal with. The time has come for African American Muslims to address the fact that their fellow Muslims not only keep slaves but are making new ones.

    What should be done to end slavery?

    Charles Jacobs: In Sudan, slavery will be ended only when the war ends. This means either a partition of the country, in which the south has an independent or autonomous existence; or with the north dominating the south in which case slavery might persist.

    Moctar Tayeb: In the case of Mauritania, where slavery is widespread and systematic, it is important to pressure the Mauritanian government by halting international aid to Nouakchott. That aid helps to maintain the slavery system.

    Samuel Cotton: It is crucial that the public be informed in a comprehensive manner. Once the public absorbs the information, it can ignite moral indignation to address the issue.


    Charles Jacobs, president of the American Anti-Slavery group

    Samuel Cotton, author of "Silent Terror: A Journey into contemporary African Slavery" (Harlem River Press, 1998) and executive director of the Coalition Against Slavery in Mauritania and Sudan

    Moctar Tayeb, was born into slavery in Mauritania and escaped at age 18
     
  2. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thank you brother Sekhemu for providing this story. There definately has been an ignorance of the role Arabs have played in the enslavement of our ancestors. There also seems to be a "cover up" over the role Arabs play in the current enslavement of our people in Africa. Although I am reluctant to criticize one's beliefs, it is quite obvious that religion is a significant factor in this system (Muslims covering for Muslims). This is why I believe that the only way black people will advance is to place race before all other identifiers: Ethnic group, religion, nationality, sex, class, education, etc. If we continue to view ourselves as Muslims or Christians before black people....women or men before black people....American; French; British; Canadan; Hispanic before blacks born out of the African Diaspora....Yoruba or Igbo before black people....it will be easy to continue the divide against us. This type of division and conflict of interest is why there are blacks in Africa ignoring the enslavement of their brothers and sisters in the own land...because they subscribe to the religion of their enslavers. It is a damning and disgusting example of brainwashing!!
     
  3. spicybrown

    spicybrown Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Right on Point...........

    I agree with both of you on this issue. Brother Sekhemu, you really opened my eyes, not that I didn't already know, but the fact that it stretches further than the Sudan. You are truly something special.


    Panafrica, I mentioned the same in a previous post about all the schisms and isms that divide us from our fellow Brothers&Sisters. Now we have the "working class"-shameful poor people(mainly Blacks) who want to disassociate themselves from the poverty-line Blacks, and welfare recipients, all in the name if upping their "status" one notch. This is frightening a little that slavery can flare back up at any given moment. Monkey see...monkey do.:nono:
     
  4. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    WOW! I am truly honored sistah! I'm flattered. :hearts4:
     
  5. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I couldn't have said any better myself. This is a da*n shame.
     
  6. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    arabs, Never have been nor will they every be...Friends of Afurakaitnit people
     
  7. abdurratln

    abdurratln Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I am a Muslim. As far as I know, and I have looked into the issue, Islam forbids slavery and racism. I can provide hard evidence to support my position. It is not merely a personal thing. At least twice I have psoted primary source material fully credited to the author and source. All of the credible evidence available to me convinces me that there is no slavery as we know it in Muslim countries in Africa or anywhere in the Muslim world.

    Now, if you have evdeidence to contrary, all I ask is that show it. Where did that material that Sekumu come from? Did it come from zionist sources? If so say so. If it did not, why noy let us where it came from? I am very certain that it did not come from Muslim sources. If we are being enslaved by Muslims, are we too stupid to say so. Do we need Jews and cursaders to talk for us?

    If there is slavery in Mauritania, show us the proof. If there is slavery in Sudan, show us the proof.
     
  8. Sekhemu

    Sekhemu Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    ]

    You're a muslim great, and I'm a practitioner of Ifa. Before I post anything with respect to the condition and well being of Afrikuaitnit people I do two things 1)Thoroughly check my sources by cross referencing, and 2) Consult my Egun (elevated ancestor) and/or a Divinity before proceeding to post any information.

    That being said, I've posted my sources on the bottom of my introduction. I have seen NO evidence that either contradicts the efforts of Mr Cotton and his organization Casmas on the issue of Slavery in the Mauritania or the Sudan, nor the testimony of Afrikans such as Moctar Toyeb or Kola Boof in their respective countries.

    I've come across more than a few Africans from Senegal to the Sudan, and I have never heard them say that Slavery DID not exist in Africa.

    I'm fully aware of the Zionist tricks as it relates to disinformation in the media, but a lie cannot stay in the dark forerver, and the story of our people is coming to light.

    Ase
     
  9. abdurratln

    abdurratln Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I will agree that slavery probably does exist in Africa. There is is little doubt that we have such practices as prostitution which is a form of slavery. What bothers me is your statement that Muslisms enslave other Muslisms who happen to be of a darker complexion. In other words, you seem to be claiming that Islam has the same kind of slavery that western Europe and the USA have. With all due respect, that is simply not true. Furthermore, Islam does not permit prostitution or the exploitation of women. In fact, Islam protects women better and more strictly than any other religion. This is why women keep flocking into Islam all of the time. The only time that women do not come to Islam is when they are brain-washed with a bunch of lies against Islam. (Note how that Episocal minister was suspended for speaking favorably about Islam.)

    I am aware that zionists spread such lies among us. But, I am not fool enough to accept much of anything that zionists say about us without varifying it with authenic African sources. For instance, Wikipedia often reports about things in Africa. But, I have read Wikipedia enough to know that they do not give us the straight scoop. So, I always balance what Wkipedia says about Africa and Africans with what I know, I am an African, and what other Africans have to say on the subject.

    Take for instance the geographic fact that there is no dis-continuity between Arabia and Africa. If we look at most maps, they will make it appear that there is a wide body of water running between Gaza and Suez, Egypt. But, if we look at a sattelite image of the Suez Canal, we see a man-made thing that conducts ships across that land. Africa and Arabia is one unbroken land mass. But, if I did not go to the primary source, I would not know this. This is becasue zionism seeks to confuse us and keep us divided.

    So, I have learned to always consider the source. If the writer or reporter is not an African, I check everything with an African because accepting it.

    If you want us to beleive that there is slavery in Sudan, you must bring us an African who says that there is slavery in Sudan. If a Muslam enslaves another Muslims, you need to show us a Muslim who will say that he was enslaverd by another Muslim while he was a Muslim; or that he knows of slavery among Muslims. I hear lies all of the time against Sudan. They want Sudanese oil. But, I do not beleive anything that is not proven by an African or a Muslim.
     
  10. OmowaleX

    OmowaleX Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Slavery in Mauritania.....



    You are on point brother Sekhemu.

    Its sad that someone is trying to blame everything on the zionists while overlooking completely a very important fact.

    MOST AFRICANS who came to the "americas" in the 1700's came from predominantly Black MOORISH EMPIRES which were raided by RIVAL ISLAMIC INVADERS, mostly who were Sunni, seeking to take over the TRADE IN GOLD.

    Mali, Songhai and a few other states were BLACK MOORISH-ISLAMIC, but also a large part of the ruling class of MOOR_I_TANIA, and the situation that exist today is an extention of the fight between RIVAL ISLAMIC GROUPS, those who trace lineage from Mecca, and those who trace lineage from KMT and the Congo-Valley (i.e Bantu) STATES.

    This is why we can not even view "Islam" as monolithic. Islamists themselves are divided between Sunni and SHIA, and some even embrace Sufism.

    Quote: "The government of Mauritania abolished slavery more than 20 years ago."

    http://www.npr.org/programs/specials/racism/010828.mauritania.html


    20, years ago, not 200 or 2,000 years ago. Yet,

    "The government isn't directly involved, and it even refuses to publicly admit that slavery exists in Mauritania."

    I think there is more than enough evidence in the slave narratives of Africans brought to the "americas" that has long established that a large number of our ancestors brought HERE (the united snakes) came DIRECTLY from Black MOORISH STATES which were overrun by arab "islamic" RIVALS and if one studies closely the treaties between the United States and the "Barbary States" the evidence is clear of a collaboration at some point between the two as a result of negotiated peace. We know from the narratives of some of our own ancestors that similar to the situation in Mauritania, the slave trade continued in the "americas" after it was abolished. For example, if it was abolished in south carolina in 1808 how else could one of my great-great-great-grandmother's have been brought here from Mali around 1820?!


    As far as the treatment of African Women under Isla, one just need web search "Islamic Sharia in Nigeria" as ONE example.

    Google it and you get 415,000 search results and again, this is ONE example.


    Websearch "Sudan Under Islamic Sharia Law". Over 550,000 results and some articles specifically state the restirctions on NON-ARAB MUSLIMS under Sharia Law.

    What someone is advocating here is that AFRICANS basically adopt ARABIC CULTURE, including Islamic Sharia Law.

    Much of the problem in Sudan is AFRICAN REISITANCE to ARABIC-ISLAMIC CULTURAL IMPERIALISM.

    This Struggle Continues...