Black Ancestors : Memorial Day: Sankofa

Discussion in 'Honoring Black Ancestors' started by cherryblossom, May 28, 2012.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Pioneering black Marines get their badge of courage

    By John Tuohy, The Indianapolis Star
    Updated 10/25/2011

    Congress voted Tuesday to grant the first black fighters of the last military branch to accept them the Congressional Gold Medal, the nation's highest civilian honor.
    • [​IMG]
      U.S. Marine Corps, via AP
      Montford Point Marine recruits stand at parade rest in April 1943 in New River, N.C. Nearly 70 years after the Marine Corps accepted segregated black units, the Marine Corps' top general is pushing to honor the history of the Montford Point Marines.
    U.S. Marine Corps, via AP
    Montford Point Marine recruits stand at parade rest in April 1943 in New River, N.C. Nearly 70 years after the Marine Corps accepted segregated black units, the Marine Corps' top general is pushing to honor the history of the Montford Point Marines.
    The 422-0 vote honors about 20,000 Montford Point Marines, who trained in a separate facility called Montford Point that operated at Camp Lejeune, N.C., from 1942 to 1949 when all military branches were segregated.



    "This has been a real long time coming," said Johnny C. Washington, 82. "It seems like everything we did for a long time was hidden. It's been real frustrating when you see others get recognition and not us."

    While the African-American Army Buffalo Soldiers and the Air Force Tuskegee Airmen have had some measure of renown, the first black Marines have grown old mostly in obscurity.
    The Army and Navy had been recruiting blacks since the Civil War. But even when they did join, the Montford Point Marines never achieved officer status and were assigned mostly to ammunition and supply duty.
    Some fought at Iwo Jima and went to Japan to clean up the ash after the atomic bomb was dropped over Nagasaki.
    Averitte Corley, 84, and Washington said basic training was brutal, their barracks were in ramshackle huts, and the Marines often were kicked and slapped during drills.

    "They tried to make us better Marines," Washington said.
    Some didn't make it through, Corley said.
    "We were the first blacks, and they wanted to make sure you measured up," said Corley, whose platoon included former New York City Mayor David Dinkins...

    COMPLETE ARTICLE HERE:
    http://www.usatoday.com/news/military/story/2011-10-25/black-marines-medal/50914336/1
     
  2. MsVeraisblessed

    MsVeraisblessed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    And they deserved it. They deserve more, tho. They deserve a lifetime reward.
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Uploaded by juniebb02 on Sep 2, 2011

    In a race against time, the largely untold story of the nation's first African-American Marines is, at last, made known through The Marines of Montford Point: Fighting for Freedom. Academy Award-winning actor Louis Gossett Jr. narrates this stirring, hour-long documentary that captures the experiences of the more than 20,000 African Americans trained in segregated facilities between 1942 and 1949 at Montford Point, North Carolina—becoming the first African Americans to serve in the United States Marine Corps.

    From its inception until 1942, the Marine Corps refused to recruit African Americans, American Indians and other minorities. Franklin D. Roosevelt's creation of the Fair Employment Practices Commission in 1941 forced the Corps, despite objections from its leadership, to begin recruiting African American Marines in 1942. The Marines' first black recruits received basic training at the segregated Montford Point Base, adjacent to Camp Lejeune, North Carolina, and would continue to do so until 1949.

    Recruited as a result of America's entry into World War II, all African-American Marines would continue to train at Montford Point well after the War's end. In the decades that followed, thousands who trained at Montford Point saw combat duty in the Korean Conflict and the Vietnam War while all the while fighting for civil rights in their homeland.

    Combining the experiences of over 60 Montford Point Marines, interviewed over a period of five years, The Marines of Montford Point: Fighting for Freedom delivers the powerful soldier stories from this brave group of men, told with eloquence, dignity, passion and pride. These true tales express anger and humor, sorrow and wisdom, yet reveal a pride fostered by each soldier's incredible accomplishments in the face of adversity. Every story contains timeless words to be heard, words to be pondered, and words that hold deep meaning and significance for American society in the 21st century. The documentary, written and directed by Dr. Melton McLaurin, Professor Emeritus, at the University of North Carolina at Wilmington, was shot and edited by UNC-Wilmington Television.
     
  4. MsVeraisblessed

    MsVeraisblessed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The Montford Point Marine Association is a nonprofit Veteran organization, established to perpetuate the legacy of the first African Americans who entered the United States Marine Corps from 1942 to 1949 at Montford Point Camp, New River, North Carolina.
    Membership in the Association is open to veterans and active members of all branches of the U. S. Armed Forces regardless of race, creed, or national origin.

    The purpose of the Association is to support educational assistance, veteran programs, and promotion of community services. The Association works to improve the social conditions of our veterans, local families, youth and the growing population of senior citizens..

    continued: http://www.montfordpointmarines.com/
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  7. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa,




    ... Yep... This is It, the perfect Memorial Day post, lol.... Thanks for sharing sister cherryblossom.



    Peace In,
     
    Last edited: May 29, 2016
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    A Pioneering Black Marine Recalls Iwo Jima

    The 86-year-old is happy the Montford Point Marines are finally getting recognition.


    [​IMG]
    Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images​


    Gene Doughty recalls seeing the American flag cut through the sky, bannerlike, as it was hoisted atop Mount Suribachi during the Battle of Iwo Jima. He was about a mile and a half away, but he recalls the sound of cheers rolling across the island.

    "I was happy to see the flag go up," the 86-year-old veteran says in a telephone interview with The Root from the Bronx, N.Y. "You could hear the thunderous roar of the men across the tiny island.

    They threw off their helmets and threw down their weapons. Some thought it meant the war was over. They were wrong. It was just the beginning. They were commanded to pick up their weapons. We learned later that the Japanese were hiding in caves."

    Doughty was just 20 years old when he landed on Iwo Jima on Feb. 19, 1945, during World War II. His story is significant because he was one of the first blacks to serve in the U.S. Marine Corps. He was part of the Montford Point Marines, which was made up of about 20,000 men who trained at Camp Lejeune, N.C., from 1942 to 1949, when the U.S. military was segregated....

    ..."I feel equal with some of the Tuskegee Airmen even though they are a little more professional than we are as Marines," he says. "We're getting almost the same award. Their award was a presidential award, whereas we are getting the Congressional Medal. We are honored."

    The stoic Marine sergeant, who suffers from osteoporosis and uses a walker to get around, is just happy to be acknowledged for his work, he says. It is unclear just how many African Americans served with him because poor records were kept, he says.

    ....complete article here....http://www.theroot.com/views/one-first-black-marines-recalls-iwo-jima
     
  9. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    VIDEO:
    http://whnt.com/2014/05/23/montford-point-marine-honored-with-congressional-gold-medal-of-honor/

    .....
    Montford Point Marines – men like Gilbert “Hashmark” Johnson, Edgar Huff and Frederick C. Branch – are now legends in the rich history of the Marine Corps.

    In 1944, Walter Palmer deployed to the Pacific Theater in direct support of combat operations in WWII. During his tenure, he was promoted to private first class.

    In 2012 congress conferred our nation’s highest civilian award on the Montford Point Marines. Unaware of the honor due him, it took until 2014 for Palmer to get his gold.

    Small in stature but big on humility, Palmer kept his comments brief, simply thanking everyone for coming to the ceremony in his honor.

    Walter Palmer – a humble representative of the legacy of service and sacrifice of all Marines who earned the eagle, globe and anchor at Montford Point Camp.
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Uploaded on Feb 12, 2012

    Last night at the Orlando Nam Knights there was a surprise guest. Charles O. Foreman, a WWII veteran, member of the Montford Point Marines came. He is part of the group of Marines receiving the Congressional Gold Medal. At 87 he is just amazing. No matter what he had to go through because of the color of his skin, he'd do it all over again. He credits the Marines with making him the man he is today.
     
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