Black Muslims : Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide

Discussion in 'Islam Study Group' started by noor100, Apr 8, 2013.

  1. noor100

    noor100 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide


    Tue, 04/02/2013 - 13:34 — Carl Dix
    [​IMG]
    by Carl Dix
    Michelle Alexander’s book The New Jim Crow takes us in the right direction to understanding mass incarceration – but it doesn’t go far enough. “It is essential to not fall into seeing the necessary resistance movement being a rerun of the movement that broke the back of Jim Crow.”

    Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide
    by Carl Dix
    This article is a response to Bruce Dixon’s March 27 piece, “Black mass Incarceration – Is it New? Is it Jim Crow? …”
    Genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages.”
    Mass Incarceration is the 2.3 million people held in prisons across the country, almost 1 million of them Black and about another ½ million of them Latino. (This doesn’t count immigrants held in detention centers.) But it is also much more than that. It encompasses the 5 million formerly incarcerated people who are treated like 2nd class citizens despite having paid their “debt to society.” When you add to this the families and loved ones of all these people – because when someone goes to jail the lives of their whole family revolves around their incarceration – you have tens of millions of people forced to live their lives enmeshed in the web of the criminal injustice system.
    The unjust incarceration of Black people on a mass scale is certainly not new. In addition to the post-Civil War Black Codes that Dixon cites (which were used to continue the enslavement of Black people under another name), incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century. (See Condemnation of Blackness by Khalil Gibran Muhammad) But as Dixon says, incarcerating this many people is unprecedented, not only in US history, but in world history.
    Incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century.”
    This mass incarceration amounts to a slow genocide targeting Black and Latino people. This is not exaggeration – it’s a scientific assessment. People being put in camps or marched to death chambers are final acts of genocide, but genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages. The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people. In his book, Drug Warriors and Their Prey: From Police Power to Police State, Richard Lawrence Miller identifies 5 stages of the process of genocide. 1) Identification. 2) Stigmatization. 3) Segregation. 4) Theft of property. 5) Extermination. He drew this off of a study of Nazi Germany’s handling of Jews during World War Two. There are likely to be variations in the process of genocide in other situations, but Black people have already been put through a number of these steps. And when you look at the way mass incarceration has already affected Black people (and Latinos as well) in the inner cities across the US, you see that a slow genocide is in progress, one that could easily be speeded up. (Developing this is outside the scope of this article, but consider the fact that for a sizeable section of the base of the Republican Party slavery is seen as a gift to African-Americans, and people without health insurance should be left to die.)
    The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people.”
    Why is this happening? Let’s pull back the lens and look at the larger picture. The skyrocketing incarceration rates in the US began in the 1970’s, in the aftermath of the urban rebellions of the 1960’s which spearheaded the development of a revolutionary movement that rocked the US government back on its heels, and as the process of searching for greater profit margins was driving the shift of manufacturing out of the US to countries around the world. From one end, the US rulers felt a need to exert greater control over Black youth to ensure they would not be in position to spark another round of uprisings and all that could mean. At the same time, the shift of manufacturing was leaving growing numbers of young Black people without legitimate means to survive and raise families.


    http://blackagendareport.com/content/mass-incarceration-silence-genocide
     
  2. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Destee played some Huey P. Newton tapes yesterday, and I learned that he refused to work for the ridiculous wages they pay and bargained for minimum wage. Of course he didn't get that, but this shows that prisoners could shut-down that slave labor and create havoc within that system.


    Peace In and thanks for the post,

     
  3. noor100

    noor100 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    [ Imam Jamil on the prison system]:

    "We have to look at what is considered the prison system itself. Allah says in Qur’an concerning Pharaoh and the children of Israel, he said that Pharaoh did subject them to a tremendous trial and that he commanded the killing of the males and the sparing of the females. You look in terms of the society that we live in, that is a clear example as to what you see going on. The killing of the males and the sparing of the females.
    In a society that tells you that you are less than 10 percent of the population, but you are 89-90 percent of the prison population, that means something is wrong. That means that everybody in some degree is a political prisoner – everybody who is caught up in this thing – because the game is on tilt. If it were a fair situation, if the playing field was level, then throughout society it would be reflective in terms of your percentage in the population. We should be 10 percent of the prison. We should be 10 percent of everything else, but this is not how it works. So what it says is that there is something wrong. I mean the deck is fixed".
    [​IMG]
    Before his imprisonment, Imam Jamil kept watch over his hood, where his organizing genius, strength and wisdom are sorely needed. It’s up to us to bring him home and free him. Write to him: Jamil Al-Amin, 99974555, USP Florence Admax, P.O. Box 8500, Florence, CO 81226.
     
  4. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This kind of article should keep us on our toes in this regard.

    We should not remain silent about this issue because, I agree that by incarcerating so many Black men, it takes away from the freedom of Black women and children. But i also believe that we need to look at the issues that have caused us to be in this vulnerable position in order to get the total victory, and so we won't keep repeating history and making ourselves so vulnerable by other kind of people who prey on us and then we end up in their system that can so easily throw 'their' books at us and put us in their prison systems while our own massis stand by, and 'they' turn around and call it 'our system' when it is not our system originally. Who is going to appeal to predisent Obama about this issue? And what can he do if we are still doing what racist have deceived us to do and end up in the prisons? This is called 'a bait and switch system, and I beleive we don't recognize this too, and then our people just stand by and do nothing-- not realizing this kind of situation damages the whole.

    Thanks for posting.
     
  5. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Thanks for keeping the thoughts and ideas of Rap Brown(Imam Jamil)alive, for those of us that closely identify with him as such... he's still talking.

    Peace In,

     
  6. dunwiddat

    dunwiddat Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    CD I have a copy of Michelle Alexander's book. It is an eyeopener. The president should be concerned...but is he:(
     
  7. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Another great work is by our ancestor Dr. Charshee McIntyre entitled: Criminalizing a Race, which basically outlines that all of this was pre-planned even before our ancestors were physically freed. The only difference is that, at that time, the prison population was mostly black women as their intent was to stop us from reproducing. In the work of Marcus Garvey entitled; The Philosophies and Opinions of Marcus Garvey, we learn that the ratio of Black men that were incarcerated in his time is exactly the same ratio that they are being incarcerated today in 2013...but we think times have changed, don't we? I guess this is why I give the work of David Walker respect. Here was a brother who was doing good in the 1800's...had land, his own home...and by right should have been content with the idea that he was doing good, regardless of the fact that the rest of his people were doing bad.

    Instead of him worrying about his own behind or simply looking out for his own self (individualism), he decided to raise some hell. Why should he have risked his safety, his home and his life for any other black people when he was doing fine? I guess if we could but look into his heart we might find that many of us don't even have one!
     
  8. noor100

    noor100 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I saw Michelle Alexander on C-Span and she seem more concern over this issue then the President or most people. Many folks feel that most people in prison belong there. [And some do].But there is a bigger picture and until one's own loved ones or associates end up behind bars or worse, only then will some people take off the blinders and see the bigger picture of what's going on here.


     
  9. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    scalar intelligence
    In the Spirit of Sankofa,




    ... We have a person here that vehemently challenges us to pick up the pace concerning our involvement with the prison industrial complex. Here's his Thread and a snippet ; take a look when you can sister noor100:

    The Art of War
    Discussion in 'Black People Politics' started by scalar intelligence, Apr 2, 2013.
    http://destee.com/index.php?threads/the-art-of-war.75320/


    snippet:
    Getting right to the point, what plans do you have to implement the idea of permanently ceasing all jail and prison labor performed by our people of color?

    No one can argue against the idea, but where is the plan to implement?

    Even more importantly, how do we exercise group control over our labor, the extent to which real impact could be felt by the enemy?
    http://destee.com/index.php?threads/the-art-of-war.75320/page-7#post-790191


    Don't be deceived by the title of the thread, the young man is quite passionate about controlling labor inside jails and prisons.

    Peace In,
     
  10. noor100

    noor100 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    [​IMG]


    The Reckoning

    What Blacks Owe to Each Other

    As a follow-up to The Debt: What America Owes to Blacks, Randall Robinson makes the compelling case that at the same time that African Americans push for reparations, they must simultaneously fight another equally important battle against the growing prison industrial system that is as ominous a development for black and brown Americans as the slave trade was for the people of Africa between the seventeenth and nineteenth centuries. Tragically, African Americans have been and continue to be overwhelmingly thrown into new prisons-for-profit, increasingly built and run by corporations. Robinson argues that blacks owe it to each other to expose and dismantle this phenomenon because the repercussions, not only to those actually imprisoned, but for the entire black community, are frighteningly multidimensional and intergenerational.
    The Reckoning grew out of Robinson’s work with gang members, ex-convicts, and others profoundly scarred by environments of extreme poverty. It pays homage to the residents of these neighborhoods waging heroic struggles to save their communities, and holds up for public examination America’s elected officials joining with corporate America to make private-sector prisons a twenty-first-century growth industry.
    [​IMG] Author photo:
    Willets Photo Studio, St. Kitts
    About the Author

    Randall Robinson is the author of MAKEDA, An Unbroken Agony and the national best sellers The Debt, The Reckoning, Quitting America, and Defending the Spirit, as well as the novel The Emancipation of Wakefield Clay. He is a professor of law at Penn State Law School and is the creator, co-producer, and host of the public television human rights series World on Trial. Robinson lives with his wife Hazel in St. Kitts, West Indies.

    http://www.randallrobinson.com/reckoning.html
     
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