Black Muslims : Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide

noor100

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Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide


Tue, 04/02/2013 - 13:34 — Carl Dix

by Carl Dix
Michelle Alexander’s book The New Jim Crow takes us in the right direction to understanding mass incarceration – but it doesn’t go far enough. “It is essential to not fall into seeing the necessary resistance movement being a rerun of the movement that broke the back of Jim Crow.”

Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide
by Carl Dix
This article is a response to Bruce Dixon’s March 27 piece, “Black mass Incarceration – Is it New? Is it Jim Crow? …”
Genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages.”
Mass Incarceration is the 2.3 million people held in prisons across the country, almost 1 million of them Black and about another ½ million of them Latino. (This doesn’t count immigrants held in detention centers.) But it is also much more than that. It encompasses the 5 million formerly incarcerated people who are treated like 2nd class citizens despite having paid their “debt to society.” When you add to this the families and loved ones of all these people – because when someone goes to jail the lives of their whole family revolves around their incarceration – you have tens of millions of people forced to live their lives enmeshed in the web of the criminal injustice system.
The unjust incarceration of Black people on a mass scale is certainly not new. In addition to the post-Civil War Black Codes that Dixon cites (which were used to continue the enslavement of Black people under another name), incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century. (See Condemnation of Blackness by Khalil Gibran Muhammad) But as Dixon says, incarcerating this many people is unprecedented, not only in US history, but in world history.
Incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century.”
This mass incarceration amounts to a slow genocide targeting Black and Latino people. This is not exaggeration – it’s a scientific assessment. People being put in camps or marched to death chambers are final acts of genocide, but genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages. The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people. In his book, Drug Warriors and Their Prey: From Police Power to Police State, Richard Lawrence Miller identifies 5 stages of the process of genocide. 1) Identification. 2) Stigmatization. 3) Segregation. 4) Theft of property. 5) Extermination. He drew this off of a study of Nazi Germany’s handling of Jews during World War Two. There are likely to be variations in the process of genocide in other situations, but Black people have already been put through a number of these steps. And when you look at the way mass incarceration has already affected Black people (and Latinos as well) in the inner cities across the US, you see that a slow genocide is in progress, one that could easily be speeded up. (Developing this is outside the scope of this article, but consider the fact that for a sizeable section of the base of the Republican Party slavery is seen as a gift to African-Americans, and people without health insurance should be left to die.)
The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people.”
Why is this happening? Let’s pull back the lens and look at the larger picture. The skyrocketing incarceration rates in the US began in the 1970’s, in the aftermath of the urban rebellions of the 1960’s which spearheaded the development of a revolutionary movement that rocked the US government back on its heels, and as the process of searching for greater profit margins was driving the shift of manufacturing out of the US to countries around the world. From one end, the US rulers felt a need to exert greater control over Black youth to ensure they would not be in position to spark another round of uprisings and all that could mean. At the same time, the shift of manufacturing was leaving growing numbers of young Black people without legitimate means to survive and raise families.


http://blackagendareport.com/content/mass-incarceration-silence-genocide
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

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Destee played some Huey P. Newton tapes yesterday, and I learned that he refused to work for the ridiculous wages they pay and bargained for minimum wage. Of course he didn't get that, but this shows that prisoners could shut-down that slave labor and create havoc within that system.


Peace In and thanks for the post,

Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide


Tue, 04/02/2013 - 13:34 — Carl Dix

by Carl Dix
Michelle Alexander’s book The New Jim Crow takes us in the right direction to understanding mass incarceration – but it doesn’t go far enough. “It is essential to not fall into seeing the necessary resistance movement being a rerun of the movement that broke the back of Jim Crow.”

Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide
by Carl Dix
This article is a response to Bruce Dixon’s March 27 piece, “Black mass Incarceration – Is it New? Is it Jim Crow? …”
Genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages.”
Mass Incarceration is the 2.3 million people held in prisons across the country, almost 1 million of them Black and about another ½ million of them Latino. (This doesn’t count immigrants held in detention centers.) But it is also much more than that. It encompasses the 5 million formerly incarcerated people who are treated like 2nd class citizens despite having paid their “debt to society.” When you add to this the families and loved ones of all these people – because when someone goes to jail the lives of their whole family revolves around their incarceration – you have tens of millions of people forced to live their lives enmeshed in the web of the criminal injustice system.
The unjust incarceration of Black people on a mass scale is certainly not new. In addition to the post-Civil War Black Codes that Dixon cites (which were used to continue the enslavement of Black people under another name), incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century. (See Condemnation of Blackness by Khalil Gibran Muhammad) But as Dixon says, incarcerating this many people is unprecedented, not only in US history, but in world history.
Incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century.”
This mass incarceration amounts to a slow genocide targeting Black and Latino people. This is not exaggeration – it’s a scientific assessment. People being put in camps or marched to death chambers are final acts of genocide, but genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages. The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people. In his book, Drug Warriors and Their Prey: From Police Power to Police State, Richard Lawrence Miller identifies 5 stages of the process of genocide. 1) Identification. 2) Stigmatization. 3) Segregation. 4) Theft of property. 5) Extermination. He drew this off of a study of Nazi Germany’s handling of Jews during World War Two. There are likely to be variations in the process of genocide in other situations, but Black people have already been put through a number of these steps. And when you look at the way mass incarceration has already affected Black people (and Latinos as well) in the inner cities across the US, you see that a slow genocide is in progress, one that could easily be speeded up. (Developing this is outside the scope of this article, but consider the fact that for a sizeable section of the base of the Republican Party slavery is seen as a gift to African-Americans, and people without health insurance should be left to die.)
The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people.”
Why is this happening? Let’s pull back the lens and look at the larger picture. The skyrocketing incarceration rates in the US began in the 1970’s, in the aftermath of the urban rebellions of the 1960’s which spearheaded the development of a revolutionary movement that rocked the US government back on its heels, and as the process of searching for greater profit margins was driving the shift of manufacturing out of the US to countries around the world. From one end, the US rulers felt a need to exert greater control over Black youth to ensure they would not be in position to spark another round of uprisings and all that could mean. At the same time, the shift of manufacturing was leaving growing numbers of young Black people without legitimate means to survive and raise families.


http://blackagendareport.com/content/mass-incarceration-silence-genocide
 

noor100

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MEMBER
Aug 17, 2010
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[ Imam Jamil on the prison system]:

"We have to look at what is considered the prison system itself. Allah says in Qur’an concerning Pharaoh and the children of Israel, he said that Pharaoh did subject them to a tremendous trial and that he commanded the killing of the males and the sparing of the females. You look in terms of the society that we live in, that is a clear example as to what you see going on. The killing of the males and the sparing of the females.
In a society that tells you that you are less than 10 percent of the population, but you are 89-90 percent of the prison population, that means something is wrong. That means that everybody in some degree is a political prisoner – everybody who is caught up in this thing – because the game is on tilt. If it were a fair situation, if the playing field was level, then throughout society it would be reflective in terms of your percentage in the population. We should be 10 percent of the prison. We should be 10 percent of everything else, but this is not how it works. So what it says is that there is something wrong. I mean the deck is fixed".

Before his imprisonment, Imam Jamil kept watch over his hood, where his organizing genius, strength and wisdom are sorely needed. It’s up to us to bring him home and free him. Write to him: Jamil Al-Amin, 99974555, USP Florence Admax, P.O. Box 8500, Florence, CO 81226.
 

Chevron Dove

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MEMBER
May 7, 2009
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Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide


Tue, 04/02/2013 - 13:34 — Carl Dix

by Carl Dix
Michelle Alexander’s book The New Jim Crow takes us in the right direction to understanding mass incarceration – but it doesn’t go far enough. “It is essential to not fall into seeing the necessary resistance movement being a rerun of the movement that broke the back of Jim Crow.”

Mass Incarceration + Silence = Genocide
by Carl Dix
This article is a response to Bruce Dixon’s March 27 piece, “Black mass Incarceration – Is it New? Is it Jim Crow? …”
Genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages.”
Mass Incarceration is the 2.3 million people held in prisons across the country, almost 1 million of them Black and about another ½ million of them Latino. (This doesn’t count immigrants held in detention centers.) But it is also much more than that. It encompasses the 5 million formerly incarcerated people who are treated like 2nd class citizens despite having paid their “debt to society.” When you add to this the families and loved ones of all these people – because when someone goes to jail the lives of their whole family revolves around their incarceration – you have tens of millions of people forced to live their lives enmeshed in the web of the criminal injustice system.
The unjust incarceration of Black people on a mass scale is certainly not new. In addition to the post-Civil War Black Codes that Dixon cites (which were used to continue the enslavement of Black people under another name), incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century. (See Condemnation of Blackness by Khalil Gibran Muhammad) But as Dixon says, incarcerating this many people is unprecedented, not only in US history, but in world history.
Incarceration was used disproportionately against Black people throughout the 20th century.”
This mass incarceration amounts to a slow genocide targeting Black and Latino people. This is not exaggeration – it’s a scientific assessment. People being put in camps or marched to death chambers are final acts of genocide, but genocide must be understood as a process that goes thru stages. The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people. In his book, Drug Warriors and Their Prey: From Police Power to Police State, Richard Lawrence Miller identifies 5 stages of the process of genocide. 1) Identification. 2) Stigmatization. 3) Segregation. 4) Theft of property. 5) Extermination. He drew this off of a study of Nazi Germany’s handling of Jews during World War Two. There are likely to be variations in the process of genocide in other situations, but Black people have already been put through a number of these steps. And when you look at the way mass incarceration has already affected Black people (and Latinos as well) in the inner cities across the US, you see that a slow genocide is in progress, one that could easily be speeded up. (Developing this is outside the scope of this article, but consider the fact that for a sizeable section of the base of the Republican Party slavery is seen as a gift to African-Americans, and people without health insurance should be left to die.)
The international definition of genocide is putting a people in whole or in part in conditions that make it impossible to survive and thrive as a people.”
Why is this happening? Let’s pull back the lens and look at the larger picture. The skyrocketing incarceration rates in the US began in the 1970’s, in the aftermath of the urban rebellions of the 1960’s which spearheaded the development of a revolutionary movement that rocked the US government back on its heels, and as the process of searching for greater profit margins was driving the shift of manufacturing out of the US to countries around the world. From one end, the US rulers felt a need to exert greater control over Black youth to ensure they would not be in position to spark another round of uprisings and all that could mean. At the same time, the shift of manufacturing was leaving growing numbers of young Black people without legitimate means to survive and raise families.


http://blackagendareport.com/content/mass-incarceration-silence-genocide
This kind of article should keep us on our toes in this regard.

We should not remain silent about this issue because, I agree that by incarcerating so many Black men, it takes away from the freedom of Black women and children. But i also believe that we need to look at the issues that have caused us to be in this vulnerable position in order to get the total victory, and so we won't keep repeating history and making ourselves so vulnerable by other kind of people who prey on us and then we end up in their system that can so easily throw 'their' books at us and put us in their prison systems while our own massis stand by, and 'they' turn around and call it 'our system' when it is not our system originally. Who is going to appeal to predisent Obama about this issue? And what can he do if we are still doing what racist have deceived us to do and end up in the prisons? This is called 'a bait and switch system, and I beleive we don't recognize this too, and then our people just stand by and do nothing-- not realizing this kind of situation damages the whole.

Thanks for posting.
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

going above and beyond
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Thanks for keeping the thoughts and ideas of Rap Brown(Imam Jamil)alive, for those of us that closely identify with him as such... he's still talking.

Peace In,

[ Imam Jamil on the prison system]:

"We have to look at what is considered the prison system itself. Allah says in Qur’an concerning Pharaoh and the children of Israel, he said that Pharaoh did subject them to a tremendous trial and that he commanded the killing of the males and the sparing of the females. You look in terms of the society that we live in, that is a clear example as to what you see going on. The killing of the males and the sparing of the females.
In a society that tells you that you are less than 10 percent of the population, but you are 89-90 percent of the prison population, that means something is wrong. That means that everybody in some degree is a political prisoner – everybody who is caught up in this thing – because the game is on tilt. If it were a fair situation, if the playing field was level, then throughout society it would be reflective in terms of your percentage in the population. We should be 10 percent of the prison. We should be 10 percent of everything else, but this is not how it works. So what it says is that there is something wrong. I mean the deck is fixed".

Before his imprisonment, Imam Jamil kept watch over his hood, where his organizing genius, strength and wisdom are sorely needed. It’s up to us to bring him home and free him. Write to him: Jamil Al-Amin, 99974555, USP Florence Admax, P.O. Box 8500, Florence, CO 81226.
 

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