Amun-Ra : Martin Luther King!

panafrica

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Aug 24, 2002
10,227
191
The Diaspora
deepy said:
thank you panafrica..
"when you are an underclassed, underprivileged and under-achieving group you can't afford to be like everyone else"...."We are not everbody else and we should stop trying to be"
truth...a reality we must , must really come to understand.
Your words were so clear , precise and I have nothing else to say except..I agree..and thanks for them
Thank you Deepy....but I have to admit, I am a card carrying member of the Negro Thought Police. :D
 

Astro

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Feb 17, 2004
46
0
los angeles
Occupation
consultant
deepy said:
"Negro thought police".....AAH Once Upon A Time When We Were Colored..
I thought I'd add a few words to this string. This phenomena plagues all mankind, there have and appear will always be forces aligned to assure conformity to a particular ideal. In certain areas this is perfectly defensible, we don't allow our children to do and say anything nor are accepting of certain frames of mind as viable for developing a healthy society/world. Therefore, with thought police we are as much needing to take into consideration what a protestor is protesting in context of what standards we've embraced to define ourselves as a people. In that regard, we also need to consider our standards, I do not subscribe to cannibalistic values, along with a host of other ideals some people embrace in the world.

Ultimately, where thought police are concerned I have no problem with people serving to voice conscience. My job is to be knowledgeable and wise enough to discern their failings, to realize that they, as I happen to be, are human beings. Icons are often absolved of being viewed in equal terms, therefore when they speak, a magical quality is associated to their words. This is symptomatic of a culture that's gone whole hog into celebrity worship. Oprah Winfrey can mention a book and, all of a sudden, it's worth reading, etc. You or I, having no ready means to exhibit our opinions are voices that are never heard. Nevertheless, where the concept of thought police is concerned I figure it a good thing we live in a country where such can occur. We always have the option of disagreeing and criticizing other folks criticizing. We don't live in a society where thought policing is a one dimensional phenomena, we can speak up to counter other's opinions. The problem is that there are hardly any venues available to counter what individuals having celebrity status has to say. Al Sharpton, Jessie Jackson, etc. are celebrities, so they're publicized. Thanking God however, the world doesn't spin on what these individuals project, at the same time, I do acknowledge they do have influence. The power of their influence rests in the lack of education and cultivation of our conscious minds. This is where the problem lays, not in thought policing, but in cultivating young people to grow and develop their minds with as much fervor as they invest in playing video games and sports. A strong mind can endure everything a thought policeman can suggest and remain on point at all times in all situations.
 

Astro

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Feb 17, 2004
46
0
los angeles
Occupation
consultant
Thought police

deepy said:
"Negro thought police".....AAH Once Upon A Time When We Were Colored..
I thought I'd add a few words to this string. This phenomena plagues all mankind, there have and appear will always be forces aligned to assure conformity to a particular ideal. In certain areas this is perfectly defensible, we don't allow our children to do and say anything nor are accepting of certain frames of mind as viable for developing a healthy society/world. Therefore, with thought police we are as much needing to take into consideration what a protestor is protesting in context of what standards we've embraced to define ourselves as a people. In that regard, we also need to consider our standards, I do not subscribe to cannibalistic values, along with a host of other ideals some people embrace in the world.

Ultimately, where thought police are concerned I have no problem with people serving to voice conscience. My job is to be knowledgeable and wise enough to discern their failings, to realize that they, as I happen to be, are human beings. Icons are often absolved of being viewed in equal terms, therefore when they speak, a magical quality is associated to their words. This is symptomatic of a culture that's gone whole hog into celebrity worship. Oprah Winfrey can mention a book and, all of a sudden, it's worth reading, etc. You or I, having no ready means to exhibit our opinions are voices that are never heard. Nevertheless, where the concept of thought police is concerned I figure it a good thing we live in a country where such can occur. We always have the option of disagreeing and criticizing other folks criticizing. We don't live in a society where thought policing is a one dimensional phenomena, we can speak up to counter other's opinions. The problem is that there are hardly any venues available to counter what individuals having celebrity status has to say. Al Sharpton, Jessie Jackson, etc. are celebrities, so they're publicized. Thanking God however, the world doesn't spin on what these individuals project, at the same time, I do acknowledge they do have influence. The power of their influence rests in the lack of education and cultivation of our conscious minds. This is where the problem lays, not in thought policing, but in cultivating young people to grow and develop their minds with as much fervor as they invest in playing video games and sports. A strong mind can endure everything a thought policeman can suggest and remain on point at all times in all situations.
 

deepy

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Jun 4, 2003
2,845
36
nyc
astro
the term "negro thought police" was new to me...and in fact i took it from
Amun Ra's seeing it in Emerge Magazine. I have no problem with the termand I , most probably, am a member as well (to quote panafrica)
I was really playing on the term when I said once upon a time when we were colored...which I was when I was growing up..and most probably still see myself that way...
 

Amun-Ra

Well-Known Member
MEMBER
Feb 15, 2001
1,868
13
Dallas
Occupation
Sales Management
Stirred a Thought

As I was reading through you stirred a thought about how public figures have a venue to be heard, but we as average people don't and you are right. I've been surprised to hear on the radio about my "black leader" or see my new "black leader" on television. Did they hold an election for this position and I missed it. Their are many in the black commnity who are qualified to speak of the dispora and as a memeber of the ilder generation, I think it is past time for Jesse and Al to find themselves some honest work instead of being "professional negroes." There are young men and women out there who actually have new ideas and new ways of doing things. I would say it is time for the torch to be passed, but they've carried it so long that it burnt out! I am waiting for some of the younger generation to stir the pot. I've seen them and I am waiting, smiling. They can do the job and they may be even better at it than their esteem prdecessors. Unfortunately, the older "professional negroes" have become politically senile. Jesse is still rhyming, only now his verse is tired--we know all the punch lines and we've come to see that the only person who seems to get helped lately is Jesse. Bring the young folks forward! Young men and women, take your place and let these aging icons rest,

Ra

:shades:
 

Omowale Jabali

The Cosmic Journeyman
MEMBER
Sep 29, 2005
21,130
9,465
Temple of Kali, Yubaland
Occupation
Creative Industrialist
Where do we draw the line? Topical comedy always walks the edge of trouble and if it has any hopes of being funny. Unfortunately, what is funny to some people is considered offensive to others. Recently, Cedric the Entertainer, came under fire for his character's comments in the hit movie "Barber Shop." Cedric plays "JD" the elder barber who talks a lot but never cuts any hair.

In the movie "JD" cracks that Martin Luther King was a "whoremonger," that all Rosa Parks did was "sit down" and that OJ "did it." Apparrently, those remarks upset a few people and among them were morning radio star Tom Joyner, who said he would not support the movie. I found Tom's reaction interesting in that it reminded in some ways of what happened when the movie "The Color Purple" came out.

Many people were offended by the way black men were portrayed in the movie and in the end a movie that was nominated for 13 Academy Awards did not win a single thing. Nothing! Nada! Zip! Danny Glover, Oprah Winfrey and Whoopee Goldberg all gave award winning performances, but because of the protest of the NAACP, the Academy lost the lead in their pencils and backed down. Even Quincy Jones who scored the music did not win.

What made that moment in history so fascinating is that it didn't distort the truth. It happened and still happens. Now, we have a national celebrity boycotting a movie for a comedic interpretation. Now the tough question. Did Martin Luther King Jr. fool around on his wife? Unfortunately, the answer is yes. Does that make him what he did for the Civil Right movement any less important? No! Does it lessen his impact in American history? No. What about Rosa Parks? She is a national icon in the black community, but did she do anything more than any other black man or woman of that time hadn't all ready done? Again, the answer is no. What she did was courageous, but she wasn't the first. However, proximity, time and circumstance and came together in one place to forever make her name treasured. Finally, there is OJ. There was no complaint about that.

Whether Rosa Parks just sat down and became famous or Martin Luther King Jr. was a whoremonger is not the issue. The issie is whether there is anyone or anything that cannot be examined, criticized or even ridiculed? At what point do we draw the line. Is there some point of maliciousness that must be achieved? Or,do we react as the tribe reacts? Are we individuals first or or we a group first?

Just some questions to stir the pot. Personally, I enjoyed the movie and would watch it again.

Ra

:cool:
Happy Martin Luther King's Day !!! :birthday:
Peace!
 

Consciousness Raising Online!

Allow the N Word - yes or no?

  • yes

    Votes: 2 14.3%
  • no

    Votes: 6 42.9%
  • not sure

    Votes: 6 42.9%

Latest profile posts

"And I'm feeling good."-Nina Simone
Destee wrote on Angela22's profile.
Hi Sweetie Pie Honey Bunch!!!! ... :dance4: ... Welcome Home! So good to have your sweet Spirit in the house! ... YAAAAAAY USSSSS! ... :yaay: :yaay: :swings: ... :heart:
Angela22 wrote on Enki's profile.
I hope all is well with you. Much love.:love:
Destee wrote on Charles Thompson's profile.
Hi Chuck ... is that you?!!! ... YAAAAAAAAAAAAAAY!! ... :yaay: ... I sure hope so! I have thought of you often! If it is not you, sorry for writing on your profile page @Charles Thompson and Welcome! ... :wave:
Destee wrote on MANASIAC's profile.
WooooHoooo!!! ... :yaay: :yaay: :yaay: .... Welcome Home! ... :wave: ... :heart:
Top