Amun-Ra : Martin Luther King!

Discussion in 'Amun-Ra' started by Amun-Ra, Oct 3, 2002.

  1. Amun-Ra

    Amun-Ra Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    1,868
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Sales Management
    Location:
    Dallas
    Ratings:
    +14
    Where do we draw the line? Topical comedy always walks the edge of trouble and if it has any hopes of being funny. Unfortunately, what is funny to some people is considered offensive to others. Recently, Cedric the Entertainer, came under fire for his character's comments in the hit movie "Barber Shop." Cedric plays "JD" the elder barber who talks a lot but never cuts any hair.

    In the movie "JD" cracks that Martin Luther King was a "whoremonger," that all Rosa Parks did was "sit down" and that OJ "did it." Apparrently, those remarks upset a few people and among them were morning radio star Tom Joyner, who said he would not support the movie. I found Tom's reaction interesting in that it reminded in some ways of what happened when the movie "The Color Purple" came out.

    Many people were offended by the way black men were portrayed in the movie and in the end a movie that was nominated for 13 Academy Awards did not win a single thing. Nothing! Nada! Zip! Danny Glover, Oprah Winfrey and Whoopee Goldberg all gave award winning performances, but because of the protest of the NAACP, the Academy lost the lead in their pencils and backed down. Even Quincy Jones who scored the music did not win.

    What made that moment in history so fascinating is that it didn't distort the truth. It happened and still happens. Now, we have a national celebrity boycotting a movie for a comedic interpretation. Now the tough question. Did Martin Luther King Jr. fool around on his wife? Unfortunately, the answer is yes. Does that make him what he did for the Civil Right movement any less important? No! Does it lessen his impact in American history? No. What about Rosa Parks? She is a national icon in the black community, but did she do anything more than any other black man or woman of that time hadn't all ready done? Again, the answer is no. What she did was courageous, but she wasn't the first. However, proximity, time and circumstance and came together in one place to forever make her name treasured. Finally, there is OJ. There was no complaint about that.

    Whether Rosa Parks just sat down and became famous or Martin Luther King Jr. was a whoremonger is not the issue. The issie is whether there is anyone or anything that cannot be examined, criticized or even ridiculed? At what point do we draw the line. Is there some point of maliciousness that must be achieved? Or,do we react as the tribe reacts? Are we individuals first or or we a group first?

    Just some questions to stir the pot. Personally, I enjoyed the movie and would watch it again.

    Ra

    :cool:
     
  2. Amun-Ra

    Amun-Ra Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    1,868
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Sales Management
    Location:
    Dallas
    Ratings:
    +14
    But are They!

    Are we not permitted to say anything about Martin Luther King Jr? The fact is that he did do what was alluded to in the movie. Is it because of the public disclosure? Are they too sacred?

    Ra

    :)
     
  3. Kitana

    Kitana Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2001
    Messages:
    1,312
    Likes Received:
    7
    Location:
    under the sun
    Ratings:
    +7
    Ra

    as in the instance of the movie, "A colour purple"..media plays a powerful role in making or breaking because it has the power to sway the masses into a certain mode of thought....

    K
     
  4. Amun-Ra

    Amun-Ra Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    1,868
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Sales Management
    Location:
    Dallas
    Ratings:
    +14
    Best Burgers

    It is true that sacred cows make the best hamburgers--the last time I checked thesepeople aren't saints, no matter how important they are to our history--we don't make a question go away because we don't answer it--I love MLK, ut I cannot deny that he did things that weren't in the best interest of his image, but it made him no less great--just human. Poor Sister Parks--she is almost an invalid now, but she hasn't reached sainthood either--truly an icon of the Civil Rights era--but she is also available for commet just by being a public figure--because we choose not to talk about doesn't mean that no one has noticed--besides, if we recall the scene from the movie, everyone in the shop shouted Cedric's character down after he made the remarks--Jesse and Al need to stick to real issues--Ra

    :toast:
     
  5. carlhurd

    carlhurd Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Oct 7, 2002
    Messages:
    51
    Likes Received:
    10
    Location:
    Detroit
    Ratings:
    +10
    MLK

    All I know that I am tired of someone always trying to speak for the everyday people. Even in our own communities we have a class war. The rich aganist the poor. If Our so called Black leaders was really interested in helping to lift us up, they would stay out of the white media and walk the walk instead of talking all the time. Also thay would encourage our people with the little money that we have atleast put our money in our local black banks if we can't do this simple step we will always be in trouble:(
     
  6. Amun-Ra

    Amun-Ra Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    1,868
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Sales Management
    Location:
    Dallas
    Ratings:
    +14
    I think the movie goers spoke

    They enjoyed the movie and despite what others may think, the pocketbooks said it loud and clear that Barbershop is a funny movie. As far as poor Coretta Scott King and her children go--that's the way of the world--people don't stop their interest in a leader because their family is still around--that's why people in the public light should consider what they do before it comes public because once it becomes public it not affects them, but all of their families, associates and friends--when any of us choose to take a path that may cause embarassment, we must be aware that more than likey our families will be affected even more--when crimminals go to jail, they take their entire families with them and affect all of their lives--Love to Sister Rosa, brother Martin, Rodney King and even OJ Simpson, but a public figure gets no mercy and shouldn't--Sister Parks may be a special case because she didn't choose to be a public figure, but neither did she turn away the accolades that came her way--no that she is old and feeble certainly affects our hearts, but for comedic material--roll out the sacred cows and golden geese so that the banquet may begin--of course as a comedian, we must also recognize that not everyone is going to like our material and that is the danger, but to hold off--forget it! Malcolm X was and still is one of my personal heroes, but he was once a petty thug, thief and pimp. It may not be what I like to hear about him, but it is also part of his life and I cannot deny it, just as he can't--neither can his wife nor child. The Revs. Jackson and Sharpton are best when they are focused on issues that affect the black community on an institutional basis. However, when I hear either of them speaking of what is proper behavior for other blacks, I remind myself of the Tawana Brawley case which turned out to be a farce and the "love child" scandal that hit the news. I like Jesse a lot because of his willingness to stand and take the barbs and arrows, but as far as Jesse telling me what I can laugh at and what is funny--I take "Eddie's" response from the movie which if you saw it is "f" Jesse!

    Ra

    ;)
     
  7. j'hiah

    j'hiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 3, 2001
    Messages:
    3,429
    Likes Received:
    67
    Location:
    lend me some sugar.. l am your neighbor
    Ratings:
    +70
    :lol: at "f" Jesse...

    i'm disappointed at the hypercritical reactions to a simple comedy by the "N double A C C P" as "JD" (Cedric's role) put it.
     
  8. Amun-Ra

    Amun-Ra Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    1,868
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Sales Management
    Location:
    Dallas
    Ratings:
    +14
    agree all da way

    Jesse and Al need to get them some business--much as I love MLK--he did it and he did it knowing Coretta was at home--still, he was a great man and no one can take that away--Amun-Ra

    :)
     
  9. Amun-Ra

    Amun-Ra Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 15, 2001
    Messages:
    1,868
    Likes Received:
    13
    Occupation:
    Sales Management
    Location:
    Dallas
    Ratings:
    +14
    I am Though

    I cut no public figure any slack--none! Martin was a womanizer and that is fact. Poor Rosa maybe she is the least pickable, but comedy rolls on the edge. Just like President Kennedy-- great man--and a womanizer. There are many other public figures black and white who werepart of the struggle and just as many of them led lives that didn't match with their public personna--we should be aware they weren't saints so we aren't ambushed by someone who knows just a little more. Does this detract from their greatness--some would say so, but I contend that a man's good deeds far exceeds their human failings.

    Ra

    :)
     
  10. Ra-Allah

    Ra-Allah New Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Sep 8, 2003
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    Everyone in the black community knows that Martin Luther King, Jr. was unfaithful. This is a disgrace. However the movie Barbershop became a problem when Cedric The Entertainer displays our "private business" to the white community. I remember sitting in the movie theater, the racial make up was about half black, half white. When "JD" calls MLK a whoremonger, it was only whites who laugh. Blacks have a hard enough time keeping MLK and other black patriots in school curriculum, so why disrespect them in front of the very people who want to discard them. As blacks we understand the importance of MLK and Rosa Parks because we understand somewhat of the struggle. However whites do not, so as the affection we have towards the leaders may not be destroyed, the little affection the white community is being destroyed. After the movie I heard many white moviegoers referring to that derogatory line. Why as black people must we disgrace our race to be sucessful. No other race does this to the extent that we do. The jews do not come out calling Netenyahu, a warmonger. Though we are still oppressed by the American gov't, we are only making our fate and situation worst with lines like the ones in barbershop. Barbershop would have been just as funny and entertaining without the two lines about MLK and Rosa Parks
     
Loading...