Black People : Martin Luther King was a uncle tom thats why whites gave him a holiday

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Aiwass, Feb 28, 2007.

  1. Aiwass

    Aiwass Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 24, 2007
    Messages:
    7
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    if you read alot of martin luther kings "famous quotes" he sounded like a cowardly man with no self respect or dignity and subservant, thats the main and only reason why he's the so called "face" of this so called black history month, you'll never hear about NAT TURNER or JOHN HORSE or YAKUB AL MANSUR on this beast's television, he was basically a flunkie so they gave him a holiday, they want all black people too look up to be him with that "love our enemy" philosphy that alot of black cowards have had sense being in this country

    and for the reward of being a flunkie they shot him anyway, my whole point is black people need to start thinking for themselves and stop idolozing any figure that white people give them to idolize, somebody told me that black people didnt even look martin luther king even back then UNTIL white people said he was a intelligent person and okay to like
     
  2. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    4,647
    Likes Received:
    363
    Occupation:
    Leader-Student-Teacher
    Location:
    Everywhere
    Ratings:
    +367
    Will respond later...

    KD
     
  3. Khasm13

    Khasm13 STAFF STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 26, 2003
    Messages:
    10,784
    Likes Received:
    4,235
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +4,472
    thas true to a certain degree...
    one point i must make in regard to ur above statements...
    never mistake wisdom and vision as cowardly qualities....

    one love
    khasm
     
  4. oldiesman

    oldiesman Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 9, 2006
    Messages:
    1,539
    Likes Received:
    119
    Ratings:
    +120
    martin luther king...

    oh boy i had to count to ten before writing a response for this on...destee is this person a[plant]or just stupid because to call the last true black leader an uncle tom is ignorant.
     
  5. mazimtaim

    mazimtaim Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 29, 2006
    Messages:
    923
    Likes Received:
    49
    Ratings:
    +50
    Was MLK Jr. . .so blind? Was he so confused by race-neutrality and colorblindness, that he could not see into the future and sense how "White" supremacy would morph and change to attempt to keep us in check?

    I don't think he was that stupid.

    Well. . .let us look at the words of Harry Belafonte;

    http://dukenews.duke.edu/2005/11/belafonte.html

    Durham, N.C. -- Entertainer and activist Harry Belafonte will speak at Duke University on Sunday, Jan. 15, 2006, as part of the school’s commemoration of the Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

    At age 78, Belafonte continues to speak out, sometimes stirring controversy, on political and social issues.

    Ben Reese, vice president for institutional equity and co-chair of the King Commemoration Committee, said Duke has received a few messages from people concerned about recent remarks Belafonte reportedly made about the war in Iraq and other issues. "Harry Belafonte was the unanimous choice of the committee and we look forward to welcoming him to the Duke campus," Reese said. "He was a close associate of Dr. King for many years and pledged to carry on Dr. King’s work within the United States and abroad. As a university with a tradition of free speech and academic freedom, Duke welcomes the opportunity to promote discussion among our students and the larger community about what these issues, and Dr. King’s legacy, mean today."

    Speaking at the 2005 Congressional Black Caucus national town hall meeting Sept. 22, Belafonte recalled some of King’s last words to him: “‘I sit here deeply concerned that I suspect we’re leading our nation on an integration trip that has us integrating into a burning house.’” Belafonte added, “I don’t think we quite understood how prophetic that remark was.”

    "snip"
     
  6. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Jan 22, 2001
    Messages:
    34,782
    Likes Received:
    8,982
    Gender:
    Female
    Location:
    betwixt and between
    Ratings:
    +9,680
    i am just about sick of you ... :puke:

    You come here calling all of us out of our names, and now you proceed to attack, disparage, and denigrate our Beloved Ancestor Martin Luther King, Jr.

    You talk as though you have a life to present, that demonstrates a love and dedication to our people, that exceeds our Beloved Ancestor. If this is what you have, start a thread highlighting those acts. Put your life next to his, and allow us all to make the determination of who is the real uncle tom, coward, flunkie, or punk ... you or him.

    Until you do that, don't you dare say another negative word regarding our Beloved Ancestor.

    You are in the wrong place for the raggediness you've drug up in here.

    You have one more time to say or do ANYTHING that i feel is disrespectful to our people, individually or collectively ... and you will be banned ... with no further fanfare, warning, or explanation.

    If you think i'm playing ... try me.

    :heart:

    Destee

    ps ... if it were left up to me ... this thread would have remained closed ... :look:
     
  7. PurpleMoons

    PurpleMoons Administrator STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Apr 22, 2003
    Messages:
    9,146
    Likes Received:
    1,097
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +1,102
    :hi:Hello Aiwass

    WELCOME TO DESTEE'S!

    It appears some of us take for granted the sacrifices and risk our ancestors took. We weren't there to experience the harsh brutality they endured; Yet, we feel obliged to dishonor their efforts and critizise their mistakes.

    How many Black people today are risking their lives defending their People? How many Black people today can say the choices they've made has always been in the better interest of Black People?

    If Mr. King was a flunky for the White man, perhapes he was doing what he felt was best at that time. Perhapes he thought, the best way to reach this racist country was to get in the inside and work his way out.

    I find it very disrespectful and ungrateful to belittle our ancestors efforts in such a way. Especially when it wasn't us who risked our lives. If it wasn't for this determined man, perhapes we'd still be drinking from the colors only fountains, and limited to venturing only certain parts of this country. And this "internet" we boldly disrepect our Ancestors on, might not have been accessible to us simple because of the color of our skin.

    He might have had to swallow a few hard pills to get his point across, but his overall success and accomplishments, makes me forever so grateful and proud to recognise him as a Black Hero.
     
  8. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    69,983
    Likes Received:
    3,977
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    BUSINESS owner
    Location:
    Da~WINDY*CITY //CHICAGO
    Ratings:
    +4,177
    Honestly MLK was a very deep and strong man , a man who had a vision
    into the future a dream to overcome and walked as a man of will , not once
    have i heard in his voice any cowardly spoken words , he was a man who
    believe in none-violant he used mental wisdom against guns and i highly respect
    his willpower .

    I can't believe u said this about a great Leader who died for you and me his people.
     
  9. torch

    torch Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Apr 13, 2006
    Messages:
    185
    Likes Received:
    2
    Ratings:
    +2
    MLK Jr was a great man....though my philosophy swings more with malcolm x....I think the white man gave MLK a holiday is because they want to make it seem that they arent racists....MLK spoke of non-violence and unity with whites....I agree about the non-violence but as for unity...when whites stop telling us to get over slavery,and truly UNDERSTAND our ancestors struggles and stop denying our past...then we can unite
     
  10. n2deepthings06

    n2deepthings06 Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 19, 2007
    Messages:
    24
    Likes Received:
    0
    Ratings:
    +0
    It would be ignorant to speak of Dr. King without context

    So let’s do this:

    The late 50's and 60's represented a time of change for imperialist powers across the globe. There issue was how to redefine their imperialism in a "kinder gentler way". America’s role was to take the lead in that effort, supporting through the CIA anti democratic efforts.

    What was not anticipated was the rising anger, and angst among the slumbering black collective in America. Many organizations and individuals had come to the forefront, in that struggle. Dr. King was one of them. Did he enter the struggle to be "liked" by white America? Did he enter the struggle to be "liked" by the white power structure? And there is a huge difference between the rank and file white person and the white power structure. In either cases and in large numbers he was hated by both for their own reasons. The power structure in this country wiretapped him, followed him, opened his mail, harassed him, and finally killed him.

    The question is why was he killed? According to the book Orders to Kill, by William Pepper, Army Intelligence had him and Andrew Young in their gun sites when the shots rang out that killed Dr. King, perhaps as a back up in case the assassin was caught, missed fired, or chickened out. Orders to Kill also accounts for the fact that when black males were arrested after riots in 1967 they acknowledged that the number one Negro leader in there mind was Dr. King. That sent shockwaves though the government.

    Currently I am producing a film tiled Beyond Vietnam - Dr. King's Last Year on his anti war stance that begun with his speech at Riverside Church in New York City, April 4th 1967 (does that date ring a bell) How many have even heard of that speech

    “It seemed as if there was a real promise of hope for the poor, both black and white through the poverty program. There were experiments, hopes, new beginning. Then came the buildup in Vietnam and I watched the program broken and eviscerate as if it were some idle political plaything of a society gone mad on war”

    These aren’t the words of an uncle tom?

    Or this –

    “These are revolutionary times all over the globe men are revolting against old systems of exploitation and oppression and out of the wombs of a frail would new systems of justice and equality is being born. The shirtless and barefoot people of the light are rising up as never before. The people in the darkness have seen a great light. We in the West must support these revolutions.”​


    or this

    “As we counsel young men concerning military service we must clarify for them our nation’s role in Vietnam and challenge them with the alternative choice of conscientious objection. I am pleased to day this path is now being chosen by more than seventy students at my alma mater Morehouse College, and I recommend it to all who find the American course in Vietnam a dishonorable and unjust one.”​


    In my poem My Life, I speak of the similarities between the deaths of Malcolm X and Martin Luther King, one of them was both men were undergoing fundamental philosophical changes, Malcolm X breaking free of the prison that was the Nation of Islam, and Dr. King expanding his world view, beyond Selma, Beyond Civil Rights, into areas of poverty and justice, and finally Vietnam.

    If you read Dr. Michael Eric Dyson's book I May Not Get There With You, or the accounts in The New York Times after the Riverside Speech, you will see that it was Dr. King, who risked more than Ralph Bunch, Whitney Young and the others. It was Dr. King who was not afraid to challenge the Johnson Administration, and administration whose “Great Society” programs were benefiting the poor, but as Dr. King pointed out correctly, an administration whose war was bankrupting those programs. Dr. King in my opinion was allowed to live because he represented a world view (civil rights) that the white power structure was comfortable with, and was prepared to make concessions, when Dr. King begun to speak out on poverty, and Vietnam he signed his death certificate. As Dr. John Hendrix Clark said, Dr. King took a bullet - we're here still talking, that tells you all you need to know about Dr. King"
     
Loading...

Users found this page by searching for:

  1. martin luther king uncle tom

    ,
  2. mlk uncle tom

    ,
  3. was martin luther king a uncle tom

    ,
  4. martin luther king is an uncle tom