Law Forum : Marriage in 1930s Georgia

Discussion in 'Law Forum - Prisons - Gun Ownership' started by StefiA, Oct 13, 2010.

  1. StefiA

    StefiA Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    OK, I'm after some definite help here with my own family history - I thought I'd got it all down right, but then chatting to someone else on another forum about family history they said there was a problem. Now my history re the law and black folk way back is beyond hopeless - so here's the problem...
    My black grandfather married a white girl in Atlanta, Georgia in the early 1930's - the guy I was talking to said that was illegal back then - is he right? If so is it most likely that they got married in another state then moved back to Georgia? Or is there even the possibility they just lived together and were never legally married? Unfortunately I don't know much about my grandmother as she died when my father was a small boy and my grandfather died a few years back - plus its rather a delicate question to bring up with my father as it could mean he was born illegitimate - plus he's the one who told me they got married in Atlanta when I was working on the black side of our family tree.
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Yep, you need to do some more homework....


    Miscegenation

    Miscegenation Laws in GA in the 1930s.
     
  3. Full Speed

    Full Speed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Georgia's Anti-miscegenation laws were enacted in 1750 and not repealed until the U.S. Supreme Court banned all Anti-miscegenation laws on 12 June 1967.


    Date of repeal of Anti-miscegenation laws in the United States by state

    I have no idea why your it would be a sensitive subject for your father to be born of a love based relationship that was only illegitimate because of unconsititutional laws. Man made laws that contradict God's laws are nothing that should bring shame or discomfort to your father. He is who he is because of his mother and father.
     
  4. StefiA

    StefiA Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    @Full Speed
    Well I'm just thinking it might be sensitive since he said they were married in Georgia instead of anything else - if it was illegal then and they just lived together I'd have thought he might have just said so - likes he's not ultra-conservative - he knows I go with guys without being married to them - so he's not prudish. I guess living together even must have been a pretty brave thing to do back then.

    My best guess is either they did that or went north to get married, but I can't find out on the net so far if a marriage in a northern state where it was allowed was valid in Georgia
     
  5. Full Speed

    Full Speed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    If he is not ultra-conservative or prudish, he probably would be open to discussing it with you. It should not be a touchy subject that his parents had to do what they had to do to make their relationship work....there should be no shame AT ALL upon him if he was "Illegitimate" based upon racist laws.

    So, is he a prud or not? Talk to him. He will probably be glad you are interested in your heritage enough to look beyond the surface.
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Stefia:

    I find it hard to believe that your Black grandfather and White grandmother were a married couple in GA or that they even lived together in Atlanta or anywhere in GA.....




     
  7. StefiA

    StefiA Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    @Cherryblossom
    Which makes this seem weirder even - guess like Full Speed said I'm going to have to have a chat with my father about this when I next go home - not sure its right for a phone conversation. Maybe he just told it to me wrong - I know my grandfather was born in Georgia, but maybe he'd moved state before marrying - I might have to look for records if he doesn't know for sure. When I looked up my father's side of the family I just tried tracing the black side to find out how far back I could go - I never bothered looking for any records down the white side.
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Well, it may also be that your father only relayed to you what he'd been told.

    But, according to the Jim Crow laws in GA, there's no way a Black man married a White woman in GA or lived together in GA during the 1930s.

    Your grandfather would have been killed for touching a White woman and your grandmother (and any children of such a union) would have been ostracized. Your grandmother would have been labeled a "n!gg3r lover" and considered a whore of the lowest repute to have lain down with a Black man by consent.

    Again, I just don't see it as your father told you. But, either he doesn't know much more than you do or he was giving you the "NICE" version of it.
     
  9. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    ....And Stefia, please help me get the "time-line" in order here....

    You say that this Black man was your GRANDfather and that he married your White GRANDmother in the 1930s.

    Well, how old is your FATHER?

    If THAT couple were your father's PARENTS, that would put your father in his 70s.


    For example, MY mother was born in 1932 (if living she would be 78 y/o now and my GRANDparents, if living would both be over 100 years old by now).

    So, I'm thinking that this "INTER-RACIAL" couple was your father's GRANDparents and your GREAT-grandparents, IF this happened in the 1930s.

    IF your father is in his 50s, then he would have been born in the 1950s, NOT the 1930s.

    Is it possible you've got the TIME wrong??....Maybe your Black GRANDfather had a CHILD (your father) with a White woman in the 1950s, not the 1930s.

    But either way, the Jim Crow Laws in GA would have made it impossible for a Black man to marry a White woman in the 1930s OR the 1950s.
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    And please don't think I'm calling your grandmother a "whore."

    But that is how she would have been labeled/treated by WHITE society because of it.

    And if she was going to continue living in White society, she would have had to say that a Black man (your grandfather) had RAPED her.

    It is also quite possible that was the "OFFICIAL STORY" for your White grandmother while the family knew the TRUTH.

    Either way, your grandfather would have had to leave GA, fleeing for his life, because he had touched a White woman.

    And any White woman who had sex with a Black man, willingly or if by rape, she would have still been considered "TAINTED" and "RUINED" by White society because she'd had sex with a Black man.

    But that's the way it was in the South under Jim Crow. No Black man could touch a White woman....or even LOOK at a White woman....Black men had to even look AWAY or look DOWN when speaking to a White woman.

    Until this day, White women have had consenual sex with Black men and then cried, "RAPE" afterwards because they didn't want "daddy" or White society to know they had done it by consent.
     
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