Black People : MANY LEADERS INSTEAD OF ONE...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Aqil, Feb 23, 2004.

  1. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    MANY LEADERS INSTEAD OF ONE

    By Jeff Wilford
    Journal Times

    When an assassin's bullet felled Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. on April 4, 1968, it robbed the civil rights movement of its undisputed leader. Dr. King not only led the movement, he symbolized it. From organizing a bus boycott in Montgomery, AL; to speaking to a quarter-million people from the steps of the Lincoln Memorial; to marching from Selma to Montgomery, the face of the civil rights movement was Dr. King's.

    The civil rights movement was an unstoppable freight train, and Dr. King was driving it. Beyond that, King was a spokesman for Blacks nationwide. He put their frustrations and hopes into words that everyone heard. Although his was not the only voice of the Black community - Malcolm X and the leaders of the Black Panthers were among many others who had followings - Dr. King's was perhaps the most remembered.

    History has recorded that James Earl Ray silenced that voice. In the 35 years since Dr. King's death, no one voice has emerged to fill that void. No one voice has emerged louder and clearer than the others to lead Black Americans in a common cause. Opinions vary as to why that is, and what it's meant for the Black community. One theory as to why is that there is no longer that one common cause to unite them.

    The absence of a single recognized leader does not mean there is an absence of leadership in the Black community...quite the opposite: "The Black community has many leaders to match its many causes," said Prof. James Marten. "And in some ways, that's best."

    "African-Americans are a lot more diverse and pluralistic than they were even 40 years ago," said Kelle Rogers, 41, an adviser for the Black Student Union at Carthage College. "We're not a homogenous group, and therefore it's hard to find one leader who could appeal across the board. And I think that's a good thing."

    Prof. Marten, who teaches African-American history at Marquette University, said: "I don't think it's necessary to have one leader. Because there's so many fronts on which the Black community is pursuing change, and given the complexity of society today, one person probably can't do it."

    You can read the entire article at:

    http://www.journaltimes.com/articles/2004/02/22/local/iq_2721624.txt (subscription required)
     
  2. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    "The absence of a single, recognized leader does not mean there is an absence of leadership in the Black community...quite the opposite: The Black community has many leaders to match its many causes, and in some ways, that's best."

    (Prof. James Marten)
     
  3. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Good Post, Aquil!!! I strongly agree!

    Peace!
    isaiah
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    I whole-heartedly agree! We don't need a "messiah." We just need a spark to starts some fires in our communities where change is needed.
     
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