Black People : Malcolm's lawyer Percy Sutton has passed

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Dec 28, 2009.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The city's flags are at half mast today, in honor of activist, politician and business Percy Sutton who died on December 26 at age 89. President Obama said in a statement, "Percy Sutton was a true hero to African Americans in New York City and around the country. We will remember him for his service to the country as a Tuskegee Airman, to New York State as a state assemblyman, to New York City as Manhattan Borough President, and to the community of Harlem in leading the effort to revitalize the world renowned Apollo Theater. His life-long dedication to the fight for civil rights and his career as an entrepreneur and public servant made the rise of countless young African Americans possible."



    Sutton is a survivor. He literally bears the scars of segregation from abuse he suffered under bigoted police officers in Texas decades ago. While the Tuskegee Airmen are now celebrated as heroes of World War II, when Sutton flew with them, white soldiers were not required to salute them even if they were of higher rank. He has fought both bladder and prostate cancer, coupled with heart problems that he says, “have taken me to the brink of death.��?
    By Adam Howard
    September 17th, 2004



    A stunt pilot, train conductor, military intelligence officer, civil rights attorney, broadcast company owner, TV producer, and borough president.

    What do these roles have in common? Percy Sutton has held these positions at one point in his career. Sutton has worked since he was a child and at age 83 he shows no desire to slow down. “I will work as long as I have the mental capacity to work,��? he says, in an interview conducted in his cluttered Harlem office, which he affectionately calls “the snake pit.��?

    Sutton’s story did not begin in Harlem, but that’s where he attained his prominence and legendary stature. In the 1960’s Sutton became known in the community as an attorney who represented social activists. When Malcolm X, then considered a controversial figure by much of the corporate media, needed a lawyer, Sutton was the only man, Black or white, willing to represent him. The two became very close and he served as Malcolm X’s family lawyer before and after his death.

    It was also Percy Sutton and his brother Oliver who helped to cover Betty Shabazz’s expenses after the murder of her husband Malcolm X. His civil rights advocacy, his willingness to be arrested and even to be placed in harm’s way for his clients endeared him to the Harlem community.

    Another chapter in Sutton’s career was his 11 years as Manhattan Borough President from 1966 to 1977. Ken Knuckles, the current President & CEO of the Upper Manhattan Empowerment Zone, the federal-state-and City sponsored initiative to revitalize Harlem, recalls Sutton’s support for the community. Sutton, while borough president “was the first one to coin the idea of tourism in upper Manhattan, Knuckles says. He also believes that, “the seed of the Empowerment Zone idea was planted when he was borough president

    From ownership of Innercity broadcasting he introduced these folks via radio to the general Black community of the tristate area;
    daily on WBLS AM 1190
    Imhotep Gary Byrd;

    daily on WWRL AM 1600
    rev Del Schields, and Donna Wilson;

    nightly on WWRL AM 1600
    activist Bob Law;

    Ra Un Nefer Amen
    Queen Afua
    Dr Joy Degruy
    Iyanla Vanzant
    Ishakamusa Barashango
    Dr Naiim Akbar
    Dr ivan van Sertima
    Dr Ben Jochanan
    professor Mackey
    the United African Movement
    The Respect Yourself organization for Youth
    by Bob Law
    The Crown Heights Youth Collective
    Project Safe Haven
    The Black United Fund
    Dr Claude Anderson
    Dr John Henrik Clarke
    Ashwa Keisi
    Brother Samajj
    Bob Marley
    The Mighty Sparrow
    Alice Coltrane
    Archie Shepp
    Dr Betty Shabazz
    Dr Adelaide Sanford
    Dr Barbara Ann Teer and the National Black theater
    The Labor Day Parade Carribbean Festival
    The Million Man March
    The African Street Festival
    Haki Matibuti
    The Last Poets
    Amiri Baraka
    Stevie Wonder
    Chuck D
    Professor Griff
    Dr Khalid Muhammed
    Abubadika Sonny Carson
    Honorable Herman Ferguson
    Dr Leonard Jeffries
    Councilman Charles Barron
    Rev Herbert Daughtry
    Fther Laurence Lucas
    Viola Plumber
    Pam Afrika
    Jeruba Ben Wihad
    Minister Louis Farakhan
    Al Sharpton
    Minister Kevin Muhammed
    Sister Souljah
    Dr Laaila Afrika
    Kenny Gamble
    Bill Mcreary
    Gil Noble
    Dr Ben Carson
    Marcus Garvey Junior
    Marimba Ani
    Mariam Makeba
    Circle of Sisters
    Tynetta Muhammed
    Bobby Seale
    Mumia Abu Jamal
    Samore' Michel
    Wole Soyinka
    and any number of community based action groups and Black owned small businesses servicing the Black community here and globally


     
  2. decipherx1

    decipherx1 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Wow so sorry to hear this news, he also helped w/ the legal fees of Buying the Apollo.
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    the world shall not see his likes again.
    I met the man at the APOLLO by accident while attending the Global Black Experience live broadcast from there with Gary Byrd, and saw him in the hallway,

    man this cat looked scary for a man in his mid seventies.
    This old guy was mad diesel, like man his arms were huge , like he could rip a telephone book into four sections without blinking an eye,
    and he was not like some dilitant, but shook my hand like he knew me for years.

    There is no value that can be placed on the many scholars he introduced to every day working, and poor Black folks in the tristate area
     
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