Black People : Lynching in the USA

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by oldsoul, Nov 7, 2011.

  1. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    May 16, 2002
    Messages:
    1,830
    Likes Received:
    909
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Staying Alive
    Location:
    Bronzeville USA
    Home Page:
    Ratings:
    +976
    (Note from OldSoul: The following post is for those who need documentation on lynching and race riots in the US. I had a conversation with some non-Black people who believed that, a) there were only a "few" lynchings and 2) that the only "race riots" were those that occurred in the 1960's and only perpetrated by Black People. And these were TEACHERS! Teach the youth the truth.)
    [​IMG]
    Courthouse Lynching of 1919 Omaha, Nebraska
    This infamous incident was part of the wave of racial and labor violence that swept the U.S. during the “Red Summer” of 1919. As in the nation at large, it was a turning point in the history of Omaha’s black community.
    in September of 1919, Will Brown, an African American man, was arrested and held in the Douglas County Courthouse. Largely due to the newspaper story, a mob gathered. Omaha Mayor Edward P. Smith was nearly lynched himself when he unsuccessfully attempted to disperse the crowd. Then the mob broke into the recently constructed building, tearing off Brown’s clothing as he was being dragged out. He was hanged on a nearby lamppost and then his body was riddled with bullets. Finally the body was burned. Members of the mob tied what remained of his charred body to an automobile, and dragged it around the streets of downtown Omaha. Pieces of the rope used to lynch Brown were sold as souvenirs for 10 cents apiece.
    One of the thousands of witnesses to the lynching was a young man named Henry Fonda, who later remembered, “It was the most horrendous sight I’d ever seen…My hands were wet and there were tears in my eyes. All I could think of was that young black man dangling at the end of a rope.”

    LYNCHING


    In the last decades of the nineteenth century, the lynching of Black people in the Southern and border states became an institutionalized method used by whites to terrorize Blacks and maintain white supremacy. In the South, during the period 1880 to 1940, there was deep-seated and all-pervading hatred and fear of the Negro which led white mobs to turn to “lynch law” as a means of social control. Lynchings—open public murders of individuals suspected of crime conceived and carried out more or less spontaneously by a mob—seem to have been an American invention. In Lynch-Law, the first scholarly investigation of lynching, written in 1905, author James E. Cutler stated that “lynching is a criminal practice which is peculiar to the United States.”
    Most of the lynchings were by hanging or shooting, or both. However, many were of a more hideous nature—burning at the stake, maiming, dismemberment, castration, and other brutal methods of physical torture. Lynching therefore was a cruel combination of racism and sadism, which was utilized primarily to sustain the caste system in the South. Many white people believed that Negroes could only be controlled by fear. To them, lynching was seen as the most effective means of control...

    According to the Tuskegee Institute figures, between the years 1882 and 1951, 4,730 people were lynched in the United States: 3,437 Negro and 1,293 white.3 The largest number of lynchings occurred in 1892. Of the 230 persons lynched that year, 161 were Negroes and sixty-nine whites.

    Contrary to present-day popular conception, lynching was not a crime committed exclusively against Black people. During the nineteenth century a significant minority of the lynching victims were white. Between the 1830s and the 1850s the majority of those lynched in the United States were whites. Although a substantial number of white people were victims of this crime, the vast majority of those lynched, by the 1890s and after the turn of the century, were Black people. Actually, the pattern of almost exclusive lynching of Negroes was set during the Reconstruction period. According to the Tuskegee Institute statistics for the period covered in this study, the total number of Black lynching victims was more than two and one-half times as many as the number of whites put to death by lynching.

    Lynchings occurred throughout the United States; it was not a sectional crime. However, the great majority of lynchings in the United States took place in the Southern and border states. According to social economist Gunnar Myrdal: “The Southern states account for nine-tenths of the lynchings. More than two-thirds of the remaining one-tenth occurred in the six states which immediately border the South: Maryland, West Virginia, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, and Kansas.”4 Mississippi, Georgia, Texas, Louisiana, and Alabama were the leading lynching states. These five states furnished nearly half the total victims. Mississippi had the highest incidence of lynchings in the South as well as the highest for the nation, with Georgia and Texas taking second and third places, respectively. However, there were lynchings in the North and West. In fact, every state in the continental United States with the exception of Massachusetts, Rhode Island, New Hampshire and Vermont has had lynching casualties.

    Lynching was a local community affair. When the sentiment of a community favored lynching the laws were difficult or impossible to enforce. State authorities often attempted to prevent lynchings, but seldom punished the mob participants. Because of the tight hold on the courts by local public opinion, lynchers were rarely ever indicted by a grand jury or sentenced. The judge, prosecutor, jurors and witnesses—all white—were usually in sympathy with the lynchers. If sentenced, the participants in the lynch mobs were usually pardoned. Local police and sheriffs rarely did anything to defend Negro citizens and often supported lynchings. Arthur Raper estimated, from his study of one hundred lynchings, that “at least one-half of the lynchings are carried out with police officers participating, and that in nine-tenths of the others the officers either condone or wink at the mob action.”

    ...
    the fundamental cause of lynching was fear of the Negro—the basis of racism and discrimination. Many whites, after Reconstruction and during the first four decades of the twentieth century, feared that the Negro was “getting out of his place” and that the white man’s social status was threatened and was in need of protection. Lynching was seen as the method to defend white domination and keep the Negroes from becoming “uppity”. Therefore, lynching was more the expression of white American fear of Black social and economic advancement than of Negro crime. W. E. B. DuBois was correct when he stated: “...the white South feared more than Negro dishonesty, ignorance and incompetency, Negro honesty, knowledge, and efficiency.”

    The rest: http://www.yale.edu/ynhti/curriculum/units/1979/2/79.02.04.x.html#b
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
    Living in a city where we cannot arm ourselves, I don't understand how lynchings can go on today post 9/11 in cities and states where sisters and brothers have carry a gun in your pocket, purse or car rights,
    and in places where all of the above were a real part of our history.

    In the 60s the phrase was "Arm the Masses"



    now it seems our youth are armed to harm each other, rather then to defend the communities down there and help the helpless.

    They even had a rap group called the Lynch Mob
     
  3. Dre Money

    Dre Money Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2011
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    142
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Pensacola, Florida
    Ratings:
    +143
    What do you mean you can't arm yourselves? Where do you live?

    I live in Florida. Also, as a veteran, after registering a gun I'm allowed to have it concealed.

    Lynchings still happen today and it's not exclusive to whites doing it to Blacks. Blacks do it to each other too just peep a random WSHH vid. It may not be in the same form but it's shares some of the same psychological underpinnings behind it. BTW Lynchings are not unique to the United States. It takes on different forms around the world. Like public stonings and beheading in Muslim communities for example. White people have been doing a form of lynching even before the institution of African slavery. Public beheadings for example 'Off with their head'. Not all of it is legal or carried out by the government. Just cause it's done in the time of 'revolution' or religious persecution doesn't make it any different. When people organize into a mob people become animals man. It's infectious too. If you've ever been in a riot before like I have you'll know what I'm talking about. People's adrenaline increase and testosterone ramps up. They just go crazy. It's like a drug and it's the worst kind of drug.
     
  4. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
    NYC guns are illegal, I thought, just about everyone knew that,
    however white racists would be happy to compare their burning, public disemboweling and castration of Africans in America, with biblical and koranic public executions
     
  5. Dre Money

    Dre Money Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2011
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    142
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Pensacola, Florida
    Ratings:
    +143
    I don't live there so no, not everyone would know.
     
  6. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
    I don't live in Haiti but I do know cholera is dangerous
     
  7. Dre Money

    Dre Money Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Oct 22, 2011
    Messages:
    282
    Likes Received:
    142
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Pensacola, Florida
    Ratings:
    +143
    Of course you'd know cause you made a thread about it. What's your point?
     
Loading...