Pan Africanism : Living over the Lake

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Corvo, Sep 21, 2010.

  1. Corvo

    Corvo navigator of live MEMBER

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    Some thing I thought interesting, in adaptability:

    Would you live in a bamboo house that was built on stilts? Would you go grocery shopping in a boat that was carved from a huge tree trunk? That’s exactly what the people from the African town of Ganvie do every day. Ganvie, which means “we survived,” is a sustainable town located along Lake Nokoué in Africa. It was settled by the Tofinu people over 400 years ago. The town was built above water because the Tofinu people believed that their enemy, the Dom-Homey tribe, was afraid of a water demon. Although it’s not a traditional earthbound town, it is a beautiful example of how people learn to adapt to their natural environment.


    see more here;
    http://greenopolis.com/goblog/green-groove/entire-african-town-built-stilts.
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Ganvie, Benin - The Venice Of Africa

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    Ganvie (meaning: 'the collectivity of those who found peace at last') is a lake village in Benin, lying in Lake Nokoué, near Cotonou. The village has a population of around 20-30,000, contains around 3,000 stilted buildings and is probably the largest lake village in Africa.

    The village dates back to the sixteenth or seventeenth century [source] and was built to save people from slavery.

    When the Dan-Homey kings armies were capturing people in the countryside to sell in the Portuguese slave trade, the people of Ganvie were saved from slavery by the Dan-Homey religious traditions...they were forbidden to attack communities on the water. Link

    [​IMG]

    The people in this unique fishing village live exclusively from fishing (along with a little tourism), use pirogues (canoes) and have a system of underwater plantings that form fences to trap and breed fish.

    According to this site there are only 'one and a half bits' of dry land in Ganvie. The full bit of land is the site of the school and the half bit will be a cemetery once enough dry ground has been laid to start burying people in it. The site has more information as well as photos. ...


    http://xo.typepad.com/blog/2008/03/ganvie---the-ve.html
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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