Black History Culture : Liberia, PA (Mercer County) Former Fugitive Slave Town

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by cherryblossom, Jan 21, 2013.

  1. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    ...
    Stop #9 Freedom Road Cemetery:
    This cemetery is located on the right across from the main gate at Stoneboro Fairgrounds. The cemetery is all that remains of Liberia, a fugitive slave town established by the Travis family, free African-Americans. For years, this community offered sanctuary to weary travelers. It was also the site of frequent raids by slave catchers. After the Fugitive Slave Act of 1849/50, most of the population fled to Canada to become legal free citizens. A few stayed in this area, one an entrepreneur who sold cigars and whiskey to his neighbors. Another person who stayed was “Auntie Strange.” She was a runaway who was persistent enough to flee the South twice. The first time she was captured, beaten, and her fingers on the left hand chopped off. The second time, she gained her freedom....

    http://www.discovermercercountypa.org/urr.asp
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    ....Going back a few years, records on file at the Mercer County Courthouse show that 1200 acres of this immediate area including Sandy Lake and the land under the lake was originally granted to three veterans of the Revolutionary War as a reward for faithful service in the Continental Army: William Ewing and Joseph Greenleaf were each granted 400 acres by deed dated 1794. H. Baldwin was granted 400 acres by deed dated 1797.

    Richard Travis, a black “free-man”, paid two dollars to Baldwin for 150 acres along the shores of Sandy Lake in 1818. Over the next several years, escaped slaves and Native American families migrated to the forest along the lake shore. According to the 1840 Census there were over two dozen non-whites as residents in the area. It is reported that this location became known as “Liberia” and continued to exist until the enactment of the revised Fugitive Slave Law in 1850.

    At that time, virtually all of the residents of Liberia fled north to Canada to assure their continued freedom.

    An official Commonwealth historic marker is located along SR62 identifying the cemetery that contains the grave sites of both the slaves who had died while fleeing the South and the ones who had established residence here. There are still a few grave sites that remain identified....

    COMPLETE HERE:


    http://stoneboropa.com/history.html
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The Struggle Against Slavery: The Abolition Movement and Underground Railroad in Pennsylvania
    Chapter Three: Helping Runaways

    In March 1855, black residents in Pittsburgh heard that a slave catcher had entered their city with a female fugitive in tow. In response, they descended on the hotel dining room where the man, whose name was Slaymaker, was eating breakfast. There, they seized the woman, and quickly made plans to liberate her.
    [​IMG]
    [​IMG] [​IMG]
    Major Martin Robinson Delany, circa 1865.


    The outraged "slave catcher" then informed the city's mayor that he had been traveling by mutual consent with Caroline Cooper, a free black woman. The mayor called [​IMG]Martin Delany a leader of the local African-American community, to his office and had him meet with the unhappy visitor to review the woman's papers. Satisfied that the man was telling the truth, Delany arranged to have Cooper released and even provided Slaymaker with a letter certifying that he was not a slave catcher and should not be molested by other groups of free blacks or white abolitionists.

    This story shows how dangerous nineteenth-century Pennsylvania could be, not only for fugitives, but for slave catchers. People today often imagine that escaped slaves and their supporters lived in constant fear of being captured or killed. The truth is more complicated. There was concern among Underground Railroad participants about their safety, but there was also a fighting spirit and a sense that on free soil, at least, they had the upper hand....

    ....Fugitives entering western Pennsylvania might first stop at [​IMG]LeMoyne House, the residence of a nationally known abolitionist doctor in Washington County. Passing through Pittsburgh under the care of Philanthropic Society members, runaways then typically headed toward Erie. Some stayed with a community of free blacks in Mercer County known as [​IMG]Freedom Road. Others passed through the town of Meadville in Crawford County, where an African-American barber named [​IMG]Richard Henderson lived. A former slave himself, Henderson offered makeshift beds on the floor of his home for any fugitive needing a night's rest....
    [​IMG]
    Tanner's Alley, Harrisburg, PA, circa 1910.

    ...In a section of Harrisburg known as "Tanner's Alley," a group of free blacks formed a [​IMG]Fugitive Slave Society that sent what they called "packages" to Philadelphia on the real Reading & Pennsylvania Railroad. There was an American Indian named Daniel Hughes who carried fugitives on his lumber raft along the Susquehanna River to a place in Lycoming County now called [​IMG]Freedom Road Cemetery. In [​IMG]Union County, escaped slaves were hidden in a stable owned by a professor at nearby Bucknell University...
    COMPLETE HERE:
    http://explorepahistory.com/story.php?storyId=1-9-8&chapter=3
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  6. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    You've gotta be kidding. That's my home town county. I was born in Mercer county Pennsylvania and as a matter of fact, I was just there visiting my father's people. I'm stunned. I never knew this kind of history existed way up there in my hometown county. I even see part of my own family name in the information you provided. I'm shocked. You never cease to amaze me with the research you provide in this community. Thanks.

    I'm stunned.
     
  7. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Unbelievable! I"m stunned!

    This may add some links to why my own family ancestors settled in this area.
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    I am so pleased that this sharing may help you in your own family history, Sister CD!

    Perhaps, when you next visit "home," you can take the tour and gather more family history, if any, as you go.....That cemetery may even have some of your ancestors in it.

    If you do find any "missing links," please come back and share it with us!


     
  9. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I certainly will. I already google map quest the location of the cemetery! It's only a few minutes from my peoples homestead.

    I plan to share this with my relatives when I go home in a few weeks. I've got a couple of uncles in the 90s!!!-and one of them is having a birthday in a few weeks!
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    ....Fugitives entering western Pennsylvania might first stop at [​IMG]LeMoyne House, the residence of a nationally known abolitionist doctor in Washington County.

    ....
    COMPLETE HERE:
    http://explorepahistory.com/story.php?storyId=1-9-8&chapter=3
    [/QUOTE]

    History: LeMoyne-Owen College

    The merger of LeMoyne College and Owen College in 1968 joined two institutions, which had rich traditions as private, church-related colleges that have historically served Black students, founded and developed to provide higher education to students in the Mid-South area.

    LeMoyne Normal and Commercial School opened officially in 1871, but it actually began in 1862 when the American Missionary Association sent Lucinda Humphrey to open an elementary school for freedmen and runaway slaves to Camp Shiloh soon after the occupation of Memphis by federal troops under General Ulysses S. Grant. The School was moved to Memphis in 1863, but was destroyed by fire in the race riots, which followed the withdrawal of federal troops in 1866. Lincoln Chapel, as the school was then known, was rebuilt and reopened in 1867 with 150 students and six teachers, but the small school was beset by financial problems.

    In 1870, Dr. Francis J. LeMoyne, a Pennsylvania doctor and abolitionist, donated $20,000 to the American Missionary Association to build an elementary and secondary school for prospective teachers. The first years were difficult ones, primarily, because of the toll that the yellow fever epidemic took on school personnel, but under the leadership of the third principal, Andrew J. Steele, the institution experienced three decades of growth and development.

    In 1914, the school was moved from Orleans Street to its present site on Walker Avenue. In that same year, the first building, Steele Hall, was erected on the new campus. LeMoyne developed rapidly; it became a junior college in 1924 and a four-year college in 1930, chartered by the State of Tennessee just four years later.

    Owen College began in 1947, when the Tennessee Baptist Missionary and Educational Convention bought property on Vance Avenue to build a junior college. After several years of planning, the school opened in 1954 as S. A. Owen Junior College, named in honor of a distinguished religious and civic leader, but the name was later changed to Owen Junior College. The merger of Owen and LeMoyne Colleges in 1968 joined two religious traditions at the same time that it reinforced the institutions' shared purpose of combining a liberal arts education with career training in a Christian setting.

    http://www.loc.edu/about-loc/history.asp
     
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