Liberia : Liberia...and the slaves who returned to africa...

cherryblossom

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Alums Vie To Lead Liberia
By CAROLINE M. MCKAY, CRIMSON STAFF WRITER
Published: Monday, September 19, 2011
Harvard is a household name for politics—but not just in America.

Ellen Johnson Sirleaf and Winston A. Tubman, two Harvard graduates who maintain strong ties to the University, are competing for the presidency of Liberia in an election to be held on Oct. 11.

Sirleaf, the current president of Liberia and a 1971 graduate of the Harvard Kennedy School, was the University’s Commencement speaker last spring.

Tubman, who earned a degree from Harvard Law School in 1966, returned to Cambridge last weekend for the Celebration of Black Alumni conference.

The conference, themed “Struggle and Progress: Leadership in the 21st Century,” brought together black Law School alumni from around the world for discussions and events. Tubman sat on a panel about the human rights agenda in Africa with other black leaders, including former Ambassador to Nigeria Walter C. Carrington.

In an interview Saturday, Tubman said he returned to Cambridge less than a month before his nation’s election because he believes Liberia’s relationship with Harvard is important for the country’s development.

Tubman explained that he hopes Liberia will become a place that young black professionals—like those graduating from Harvard—will consider as a potential location to live and work.

He said he hopes to “be able to reach out to all my friends and say ‘Look, I have this big job to do, and I need all the help from all my friends—including my influential powerful friends from Harvard.’”
The relationship between Harvard and Liberia reaches back to the 19th century. Simon Greenleaf, a Harvard professor, drafted Liberia’s constitution in 1847. A little more than a century later, in 1951, Joseph R. Grimes, a graduate of the Law School, founded Liberia’s first law school.

Tubman said that Harvard and the U.S. feel a special bond to Liberia because of “the tie of blood”—a reference to the thousands of American slaves who returned to Liberia after emancipation....

continued here: http://www.thecrimson.com/article/2011/9/19/harvard-tubman-school-liberia/
 

cherryblossom

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The American Colonization Society (ACS), also known as the American Society for Colonizing the Free People of Color in the United States, emerged in 1816 as a national organization dedicated to promoting the manumission of the enslaved and the settlement of free blacks in West Africa, specifically in the colony of Liberia. The ACS transported approximately 12,000 blacks to Liberia over the course of its existence. ...

.....The society's program focused on purchasing and freeing slaves, paying their passage (and that of free blacks) to the west coast of Africa, and assisting them after their arrival there. The federal government provided some initial funding for the Society and helped the ACS purchase the Cape Mesurado area off the coast of West Africa which subsequently became the colony of Liberia. In 1830 the government ended its payments to the ACS; from then on the colonization program was financed exclusively by local and state branches and from churches. In 1838 the ACS adopted a new constitution, one in which the organization became a federation of state auxiliaries.

Between 1820 and 1831 nearly 3,000 black emigrants went to the ACS’s settlement in Liberia. By the mid 1830s though, negative reports from previous emigrants and improving economic conditions for blacks in the United States led to a decline in the Society’s ability to recruit new emigrants.
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In 1847, Liberia declared its independence from the American Colonization Society. As the only western-oriented nation on the African continent, Liberia attracted another 2,000 settlers between 1848 and 1860. It was inactive during the American Civil War as African Americans gained their freedom and thus saw no reason to emigrate...


COMPLETE HERE:

http://www.blackpast.org/?q=aah/american-colonization-society-1816-1964
 

mywordsfly

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I watched this documentary once. An easy 50 minute watch, or should I say hard for content? But not long at all and appears very informative.


It changed me. In specific the sequence of the boy who appears to be no more than 15 smoking crack I believe, and then speaking in detail of a woman he had raped at gunpoint.

It was also interesting for me to learn that when they were brought back to Africa, they immediately enslaved the Africans living there.
 

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