Black Ancestors : Lest We Forget....

Discussion in 'Honoring Black Ancestors' started by MississippiRed, Mar 1, 2006.

  1. MississippiRed

    MississippiRed Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Speakers honor bomb victim Jackson
    By Julie Finley
    The Natchez Democrat



    NATCHEZ — The 90-or-so people gathered at a Wharlest Jackson Sr. memorial service Monday night had fond memories, proud comments and sad stories, but they didn’t have what may be needed most — justice.

    It’s been 39 years since a bomb planted under Jackson’s truck exploded, killing him. And it’s been 39 years with no arrests.

    Family, friends and community members gathered at Christian Hope Baptist Church for the first service of its kind.

    “That day some 39 years ago tonight was forever etched into the minds of some,” Mayor Phillip West said. “It inspired calls for justice, but justice never arrived.

    “I know we are working, but with each passing day I feel somewhat hopeless to see some justice brought to Wharlest Jackson.”

    Jackson, treasurer of the local NAACP, had recently been promoted to a “whites-only” job at Armstrong Tire & Rubber Co. He worked a full shift on Feb. 27, 1967 before getting in truck to drive home. He only made it a few blocks.



    “One man gets the opportunity to better himself, and one evening he got bombed,” the Rev. John Scott Sr. said. “Because of Wharlest Jackson Sr., Mississippi is a better place to live.”

    And his death wasn’t in vain, speaker after speaker told the family.

    “It was and is now what signaled the Natchez African-American community was not going to be turned around,” Ser Seshab Heter-Boxley said.

    West said Natchez has come a long way since Jackson’s death b ut has a long way to go.

    “We are charged with the responsibility to make the city of Natchez better today that it was yesterday,” West said. “Wharlest Jackson’s death symbolized a movement toward this day.”

    West and others acknowledged embarrassment that there hasn’t been a memorial service for Jackson in past years. West also said he wanted the city to do something to commemorate Jackson’s life and death.

    Two of Jackson’s children, Wharlest Jr. and Denise Ford, were at Monday’s service with their families and heard several speakers praise Jackson’s role as a family man.

    Henry Murphy was a child when Jackson married into his family.

    “I remember Wharlest Jackson as the guy who always twisted my arm and made me cry,” Murphy said. “He was like a big brother. This was a family man. In his household he was the glue that held it together.”

    John Scott Jr. was a child when Jackson died and was friends with the Jackson children.

    “The sadness I felt at the death of Wharlest Jackson was not because a civil rights leader had been killed but because my friend had lost a father.”

    Ford, who helped organize the service, thanked everyone for attending.

    “We know that in the depths of our hearts God has taken care of our situation,” she said.

    In July, U.S. Attorney Dunn Lampton reopened Jackson’s murder case along with the civil rights killings of Charles Moore and Henry Hezekiah Dee of Franklin County.

    Anyone with any information about any of the murders can call the FBI at 601-948-5000 or the Mississippi Highway Safety Patrol at 601-987-1560. Lampton’s office can be contacted at, 601-965-4480."





    MississippiRed
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    BLOODY SUNDAY

    March 7, 1965




     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    On July 25, 1946, four young African Americans—George & Mae Murray Dorsey and Roger & Dorothy Malcom—were shot hundreds of times by 12 to 15 unmasked white men in broad daylight at the Moore's Ford bridge spanning the Apalachee River, 60 miles east of Atlanta, Georgia. These killings, for which no one was ever prosecuted, enraged President Harry Truman and led to historic changes, but were quickly forgotten in Oconee and Walton Counties where they occurred. No one was ever brought to justice for the crime.

    http://www.mooresford.org/history.html
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Sharpeville Massacre
    The Origin of South Africa's Human Rights Day

    By Alistair Boddy-Evans, About.com Guide


    On 21 March 1960 at least 180 black Africans were injured (there are claims of as many as 300) and 69 killed when South African police opened fire on approximately 300 demonstrators, who were protesting against the pass laws, at the township of Sharpeville, near Vereeniging in the Transvaal. In similar demonstrations at the police station in Vanderbijlpark, another person was shot. Later that day at Langa, a township outside Cape Town, police baton charged and fired tear gas at the gathered protesters, shooting three and injuring several others. The Sharpeville Massacre, as the event has become known, signalled the start of armed resistance in South Africa, and prompted worldwide condemnation of South Africa's Apartheid policies.

    A build-up to the massacre

    On 13 May 1902 the treaty which ended the Anglo-Boer War was signed at Vereeniging; it signified a new era of cooperation between English and Afrikaner living in Southern Africa. By 1910, the two Afrikaner states of Orange River Colony (Oranje Vrij Staat) and Transvaal (Zuid Afrikaansche Republick) were joined with Cape Colony and Natal as the Union of South Africa. The repression of black Africans became entrenched in the constitution of the new union (although perhaps not intentionally) and the foundations of Grand Apartheid were laid...

    http://africanhistory.about.com/od/apartheid/a/SharpevilleMassacrePt1.htm
     
  5. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

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    the struggle continues......

    :whip:
     
  6. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    we like an endless struggle in life , can't forget !
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The Elaine Massacre was by far the deadliest racial confrontation in Arkansas history and possibly the bloodiest racial conflict in the history of the United States. While its deepest roots lay in the state’s commitment to white supremacy, the events in Elaine stemmed from tense race relations and growing concerns about labor unions. A shooting incident that occurred at a meeting of the Progressive Farmers and Household Union escalated into mob violence on the part of the white people in Elaine (Phillips County) and surrounding areas. Although the exact number is unknown, estimates of the number of African Americans killed by whites range into the hundreds; five white people lost their lives.

    The conflict began on the night of September 30, 1919, when approximately 100 African Americans, mostly sharecroppers on the plantations of white landowners, attended a meeting of the Progressive Farmers and Household Union of America at a church in Hoop Spur (Phillips County), three miles north of Elaine. The purpose of the meeting, one of several by black sharecroppers in the Elaine area during the previous months, was to obtain better payments for their cotton crops from the white plantation owners who dominated the area during the Jim Crow era. Black sharecroppers were often exploited in their efforts to collect payment for their cotton crops.
    .....

    http://www.encyclopediaofarkansas.net/encyclopedia/entry-detail.aspx?entryID=1102
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Scipio Africanus Jones (3 August 1863 - 2 March 1943) was an African-American educator, attorney, judge, philanthropist, and Republican politician from the state of Arkansas. He was most famous for successfully guiding the appeals of the twelve men condemned to death after the Elaine Race Riots of 1919.
    Scipio Africanus Jones was born in Smith Township, near Tulip in Dallas County, Arkansas.

    The Elaine Twelve
    Jones is most famous for his skillful defense of the Elaine 12, twelve black sharecroppers sentenced to death for participation in the Elaine Race Riot in 1919. The twelve men had been sentenced to death by an all-white jury in a series of trials that were said to have lasted approximately 20 minutes.

    The plight of the Elaine 12, and 87 other black men who were convicted to prison terms for participation in the riot, quickly made international headlines. Three organizations offered assistance: the Arkansas Conference on Negro Organizations (ACNO), the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP), and the National Equal Rights League (NERL). The ACNO and NERL joined together to hire Jones as the defense attorney for all 99 of the convicted men. The NAACP hired former state attorney general George W. Murphy as the defense attorney for only the Elaine 12. The two attorneys were friends and decided to work together.

    When Murphy died unexpectedly, Jones took the lead in guiding the appeals process. After much internal debate, the NAACP temporarily retained Jones as their replacement for Murphy, making him briefly the sole attorney for all of the 99 defendants. He successfully saw the Elaine 12 case to the Supreme Court of the United States and is credited with having been the author of the brief used before the Court.[2]

    When it was time to argue the Elaine 12 case before the Supreme Court, the NAACP decided to replace Jones with Moorfield Storey and former assistant U.S. attorney Ulyssess S. Bratton. It was Jones' efforts that led to the landmark Supreme Court Moore v. Dempsey ruling that, for the first time, permitted collateral attack through habeas corpus on a state appellate court decision.

    During the trials, Jones received frequent lynching threats and was said to have shifted his location each night to avoid those who wanted the Elaine 12 defendants convicted at any cost.

    New trials were granted to the twelve defendants as the court stated that they had not received due process in the original trials.

    Charges were quickly dismissed against six of the defendants. The remaining six were retried, convicted and sentenced to twelve years in prison. Jones successfully lobbied Arkansas Governor Thomas McRae, who had earlier refused to release the defendants, to let men out on indefinite furloughs in 1925 just hours before Governor-Elect Thomas Terral assumed office.

    This was important because Terral was a member of the Ku Klux Klan (KKK). During a speech before one of the largest KKK rallies in Arkansas history the night before his inauguration, Terral vowed to execute the remaining Elaine 12 defendants as his first official duty in office.

    Before leaving office, Governor McRae also pardoned the other 87 Elaine defendants.

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Scipio_Africanus_Jones
     
  9. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Yes, Aluta Continua!
     
  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    A pathological racist, Christopher launched a one-man war against blacks
    in September 1980, claiming victims from upstate New York to
    southwestern Georgia. ..... His legacy of death and
    hatred lingers to the present day, as several of the crimes connected to
    his rampage -- or inspired by his example -- are officially unsolved.

    The war began September 22, when 14-year-old Glenn Dunn was shot and
    killed outside a Buffalo supermarket.
    The victim was sitting in a stolen
    car when he died, and witnesses described his assailant as an
    unidentified "white youth." The following day, 32-year-old Harold Green
    was shot while dining at a fast-food restaurant in suburban Cheektowaga
    .
    That night, Emmanuel Thomas, age 30, was killed by a sniper while
    crossing the street to his home
    , seven blocks from the scene of Dunn's
    murder. On September 24, the action shifted to nearby Niagara Falls,
    with the murder of a fourth black, Joseph McCoy
    .

    Investigators found that all four victims were killed with the same gun,
    and headlines followed their fruitless search for the elusive
    ".22-caliber killer." Buffalo blacks complained of nonexistent police
    protection, and there were sporadic incidents of blacks pelting white
    motorists on the streets. A cross was burned in Buffalo, and fears were
    voiced that the murders might be a preview of things to come, paving the
    way for some paramilitary racist group's campaign of local genocide
    .

    Things got worse on October 8, when 71-year-old Parler Edwards, a black
    taxi driver, was found in the trunk of his car, parked in suburban
    Amherst, his heart cut out and carried from the scene. Next day, another
    black cabbie, 40-year-old Ernest Jones, was found beside the Niagara
    River in Tonawanda, the heart ripped from his chest. His blood-spattered taxi was retrieved by police in Buffalo, three miles away.

    The local black community was verging on a state of panic now, made
    worse by an incident in a Buffalo hospital on October 10. A black
    patient, 37-year-old Collin Cole, was recuperating from illness when a
    white stranger appeared at his bedside and snarled, "I hate *******." A
    nurse's arrival saved Cole from death by strangulation, but his
    condition was listed as serious, with severe damage done to his throat.

    Descriptions of the would-be strangler roughly matched eyewitness
    reports on the ".22-caliber killer."

    The action shifted to Manhattan on December 22, with five blacks and one
    Hispanic victim stabbed -- four of them killed -- in less than thirteen
    hours. John Adams, 25 years old, was the first to fall, narrowly
    escaping death when he was knifed by a white assailant around 11:30 a.m.
    Two hours later, 32-year-old Ivan Frazier was accosted on the street,
    deflecting a blade with his hand, sustaining minor injuries before he
    fled on foot. The next four victims were less fortunate. Messenger Luis
    Rodriguez, 19, was stabbed to death around 3:30 p.m. in what police
    described as "an apparent holdup." No motive was suggested in the deaths
    of 30-year-old Antone Davis, knifed around 6:50 p.m., or 20-year-old
    Richard Renner, killed less than four hours later. The last victim,
    discovered just before midnight, was a black "John Doe" stabbed to death
    on the street near Madison Square Garden.


    Police were still searching desperately for the elusive "Midtown
    Slasher" when 31-year-old Roger Adams, a black man, was stabbed to death
    in Buffalo on December 29. Wendell Barnes, 26, was fatally wounded in
    Rochester, on December 30, but Buffalo native Albert Menefee was luckier
    the next day, surviving a thrust that nicked his heart. On January 1,
    Larry Little and Calvin Crippen survived separate attacks, fighting off
    their white assailant with only minor injuries.


    On January 6, police announced that the recent stabbings were "probably
    linked" with Buffalo's unsolved .22-caliber shootings, but still they
    seemed no closer to a suspect. The case broke twelve days later, in
    Georgia, when Pvt. Joseph Christopher, age 25, was arrested at Fort
    Benning, charged with slashing a black GI. A search of his former
    residence, near Buffalo, turned up quantities of .22-caliber ammunition,
    a gun barrel, and two sawed-off rifle stocks. More to the point,
    authorities learned that Christopher had joined the army on November 13,
    arriving at Fort Benning six days later. He was absent on leave from
    December 19 to January 4, with a bus ticket recording his arrival in
    Manhattan on December 20.

    Hospitalized with self-inflicted wounds on May 6, 1981, Christopher
    bragged to a nurse of his involvement in the September slayings around
    Buffalo.....

    ...COMPLETE ARTICLE HERE: http:[email protected]/msg01557.html
     
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