Black People : Lest We Forget...HIStory

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by truetothecause, Nov 6, 2008.

  1. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    FBI's War on Black America Part 1




    Part 2


    Part 3


    Part 4


    and finally
    Part 5





    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  2. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    BUMP....JUST FOR THE HECK OF IT...


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Martyrs of the Civil Rights Movement


    1955

    REV. GEORGE LEE, one of the first black people registered to vote in Humphreys County, used his pulpit and his printing press to urge others to vote. White officials offered Lee protection on the condition he end his voter registration efforts, but Lee refused and was murdered.
    MAY 7, 1955 -- Belzoni, Miss.

    LAMAR SMITHwas shot dead on the courthouse lawn by a white man in broad daylight while dozens of people watched. The killer was never indicted because no one would admit they saw a white man shoot a black man. Smith had organized blacks to vote in a recent election.
    AUGUST 13, 1955 -- Brookhaven, Miss.

    EMMETT LOUIS TILL, a 14-year-old boy on vacation from Chicago, reportedly flirted with a white woman in a store. That night, two men took Till from his bed, beat him, shot him, and dumped his body in the Tallahatchie River. An all-white jury found the men innocent of murder.
    AUGUST 28, 1955 -- Money, Miss.

    JOHN EARL REESE, 16, was dancing in a café when white men fired shots into the windows. Reese was killed and two others were wounded. The shootings were part of an attempt by whites to terrorize blacks into giving up plans for a new school.
    OCTOBER 22, 1955 -- Mayflower, TX.

    1957

    WILLIE EDWARDS JR., a truck driver, was on his way to work when he was stopped by four Klansmen. The men thought Edwards was another man who they believed was dating a white woman. They forced Edwards at gunpoint to jump off a bridge into the Alabama River. Edwards’s body was found three months later. His killers never went to trial.
    JANUARY 23, 1957 -- Montgomery, Ala.

    1959

    MACK CHARLES PARKER, 23, was accused of raping a white woman. Three days before his case was set for trial, a masked mob took him from his jail cell, beat him, shot him, and threw him in the Pearl River. The community generally approved of the lynching, and the men were never convicted.
    APRIL 25, 1959 -- Poplaville, Miss.


    1960

    HERBERT LEE, who worked with civil rights leader Bob Moses to help register black voters, was killed by a state legislator who claimed self-defense and was never arrested. Louis Allen, a black man who witnessed the murder, was also killed. SEPTEMBER 25, 1961 -- Liberty, Miss.

    1962

    CPL. ROMAN DUCKSWORTH JR., a military police officer stationed in Maryland, was on leave to visit his sick wife when he was ordered off a bus in by a police officer and shot dead. The police officer may have mistaken Ducksworth for a "freedom rider" who was testing bus desegregation laws.
    APRIL 9, 1962 -- Taylorsville, Miss.

    PAUL GUIHARD, a reporter for a French news service, was killed by gunfire from a white mob during protests over the admission of James Meredith to the University of Mississippi.
    SEPTEMBER 30, 1962 -- Oxford, Miss.

    1963

    WILLIAM LEWIS MOORE, a postman from Baltimore, was shot and killed during a one-man march against segregation. Moore had planned to deliver a letter to the governor of Mississippi urging an end to intolerance. APRIL 23, 1963 -- Attalla, Ala.

    MEDGAR EVERS, who directed NAACP operations in Mississippi, was leading a campaign for integration in Jackson when he was shot and killed by a sniper at his home. JUNE 12, 1963 -- Jackson, Miss.

    ADDIE MAE COLLINS, DENISE MCNAIR, CAROLE ROBERTSON and CYNTHIA WESLEY were getting ready for church services when a bomb exploded at the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church, killing all four of the school-age girls. The church had been a center for civil rights meetings and marches. SEPTEMBER 15, 1963 -- Birmingham, Ala.

    VIRGIL LAMAR WARE, 13, was riding on the handlebars of his brother’s bicycle when he was fatally shot by white teenagers. The white youths had come from a segregationist rally held in the aftermath of the Sixteenth Street Baptist Church bombing. SEPTEMBER 15, 1963 -- Birmingham, Ala.

    1964

    JOHNNIE MAE CHAPPELL, who cleaned houses to help support her family, was shot by four white men as she searched for a lost wallet along a roadside. The murder occurred during an outbreak of racial violence in downtown Jacksonville. MARCH 23, 1964 -- Jacksonville, Florida

    LOUIS ALLEN, who witnessed the murder of civil rights worker Herbert Lee, endured years of threats, jailings and harassment. He was making final arrangements to move North on the day he was killed. APRIL 7, 1964 -- Liberty, Miss.

    REV. BRUCE KLUNDER was among civil rights activists who protested the building of a segregated school by placing their bodies in the way of construction equipment. Klunder was crushed to death when a bulldozer backed over him. APRIL 7, 1964 -- Cleveland, Ohio

    HENRY HEZEKIAH DEE and CHARLES EDDIE MOORE were killed by Klansmen who believed the two were part of a plot to arm blacks in the area. (There was no such plot.) Their bodies were found during a massive search for the missing civil rights workers Chaney, Goodman, and Schwerner.
    MAY 2, 1964 -- Meadville, Miss.

    JAMES EARL CHANEY, ANDREW GOODMAN, and MICHAEL HENRY SCHWERNER, young civil rights workers, were arrested by a deputy sheriff and then released into the hands of Klansmen who had plotted their murders. They were shot, and their bodies were buried in an earthen dam.
    JUNE 21, 1964 -- Philadelphia, Miss.

    LT. COL. LEMUEL PENN, a Washington, D.C. educator, was driving home from the U.S. Army Reserves training when he was shot and killed by Klansmen in a passing car. JULY 11, 1964 -- Colbert, Ga.

    1965

    JIMMIE LEE JACKSON was beaten and shot by state troopers as he tried to protect his grandfather and mother from a trooper attack on civil rights marchers. His death led to the Selma-Montgomery march and the eventual passage of the Voting Rights Act. FEBRUARY 26, 1965 -- Marion, Ala.

    REV. JAMES REEB, a Unitarian minister from Boston, was among many white clergymen who joined the Selma marchers after the attack by state troopers at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. Reeb was beaten to death by white men while he walked down a Selma street. MARCH 11, 1965 -- Selma, Ala.

    VIOLA GREG LIUZZO, a housewife and mother from Detroit, drove alone to Alabama to help with the Selma march after seeing televised reports of the attack at the Edmund Pettus Bridge. She was driving marchers back to Selma from Montgomery when she was shot and killed by a Klansmen in a passing car. MARCH 25, 1965 -- Selma Highway, Ala.

    ONEAL MOORE was one of two black deputies hired by white officials in an attempt to appease civil rights demands. Moore and his partner Creed Rogers were on patrol when they were blasted with gunfire from a passing car. Moore was killed and Rogers was wounded. JUNE 2, 1965 -- Bogalusa, La.

    WILLIE BREWSTER was on his way home from work when he was shot and killed by white men. The men belonged to the National States Rights Party, a violent neo-Nazi group whose members had been involved in church bombings and murders of blacks. JULY 18, 1965 -- Anniston, Ala.

    JONATHAN MYRICK DANIELS, an Episcopal Seminary student in Boston, had come to Alabama to help with black voter registration in Lowndes County. He was arrested at a demonstration, jailed in Hayneville and then suddenly released. Moments after his release, he was shot to death by a deputy sheriff. AUGUST 20, 1965 -- Hayneville, Ala.

    1966

    SAMUEL LEAMON YOUNGE JR., a student civil rights activist, was fatally shot by a white gas station owner following an argument over segregated restrooms. JANUARY 3, 1966 -- Tuskegee, Ala.

    VERNON FERDINAND DAHMER, a wealthy businessman, offered to pay poll taxes for those who couldn’t afford the fee required to vote. The night after a radio station broadcasted Dahmer’s offer, his home was firebombed. Dahmer died later from severe burns. JANUARY 10, 1966 -- Hattiesburg, Miss.

    BEN CHESTER WHITE, who had worked most of his life as a caretaker on a plantation, had no involvement in civil rights work. He was murdered by Klansmen who thought they could divert attention from a civil rights march by killing a black person. JUNE 10, 1966 -- Natchez, Miss.

    CLARENCE TRIGGS was a bricklayer who had attended civil rights meetings sponsored by the Congress of Racial Equality. He was found dead on a roadside, shot through the head. Whites were arrested but never convicted of the murder. JULY 30, 1966 -- Bogalusa, La.

    1967

    WHARLEST JACKSON, the treasurer of his local NAACP chapter, was one of many blacks who received threatening Klan notices at his job. After Jackson was promoted to a position previously reserved for whites, a bomb was planted in his car. It exploded minutes after he left work one day, killing him instantly. FEBRUARY 27, 1967 -- Natchez, Miss.

    BENJAMIN BROWN, a former civil rights organizer, was watching a student protest from the sidelines when he was hit by stray gunshots from police who fired into the crowd. MAY 12, 1967 -- Jackson, Miss.

    1968

    SAMUEL EPHESIANS HAMMOND, JR., DELANO HERMAN MIDDLETON and HENRY EZEKIAL SMITH were shot and killed by police who fired on student demonstrators at the South Carolina State College campus. FEBRUARY 8, 1968 -- Orangeburg, S.C.

    DR. MARTIN LUTHER KING JR., a Baptist minister, was a major architect of the civil rights movement. He led and inspired major non-violent desegregation campaigns, including those in Montgomery and Birmingham. He won the Nobel Peace Prize. He was assassinated as he prepared to lead a demonstration in Memphis. APRIL 4, 1968 -- Memphis, Tenn.

    1970

    On may 14-15, 1970 students at Jackson State College in Jackson, Mississippi, protested discrimination and the historical racial intimidation and harassment by white motorists traveling Lynch Street, a major thoroughfare that divided the campus and linked west Jackson to downtown. The students were also protesting against the Vietnam War and the May 4, 1970 tragedy at Kent State University in Ohio. Jackson city police and Mississippi State troopers had ordered the demonstration, taking place in front of a women's dorm, to disperse. When students started to scatter and run into the dorm, the police opened up a barrage of fire lasting 28 seconds. They fired thirty-five shotguns, five military carbines and anything else they could get their hands on. Two students were killed and twelve wounded.

    Phillip Gibbs, a twenty year old junior, and James Earl Green, a Jackson High school student were slain. May 15, 1970 -- Jackson, Mississippi






    http://www.blackmississippi.com/indexarticle.html?page=main&id=-1&grid=&fid=1136
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  5. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    THANK YOU for these BlackTasTic additions....

    http://www.iwanttoremember.com/



    Lest WE Forget :SuN042:


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  6. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

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    May we never forget and understand that these attacks still happening today !
    sister True and cherryblossom thankz for keeping the history up close and personal !!!
     
  7. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The Greensboro massacre occurred on November 3, 1979 in Greensboro, North Carolina, United States. Five communist protest marchers were shot and killed by members of the Ku Klux Klan and the American Nazi Party. The protest was the culmination of attempts by the Maoist Workers Viewpoint Organization to organize mostly black industrial workers in the area.[1]

    The marchers killed were: Sandi Smith, a nurse and civil rights activist; Dr. James Waller, president of a local textile workers union who ceased medical practice to organize workers; Bill Sampson, a graduate of the Harvard School of Divinity; Cesar Cauce, a Cuban immigrant who graduated magna cum laude from Duke University; and Dr. Michael Nathan, chief of pediatrics at Lincoln Community Health Center in Durham, North Carolina, a clinic that helped children from low-income families.


    Rally
    Hostility between the groups flared in July 1979 when protesters disrupted a screening of the 1915 epic, Birth of a Nation directed by D. W. Griffith, a cinematographic portrayal of the formation of a Ku Klux Klan. Taunts and inflammatory rhetoric were exchanged during the ensuing months. On November 3, 1979 a rally and march of industrial workers and Communists was planned in Greensboro against the Ku Klux Klan. The Death to the Klan March was to begin in a predominantly black housing project called Morningside Homes. Communist organizers publicly challenged the Klan to present themselves and "face the wrath of the people". During the rally, a caravan of cars containing Klansmen and members of the American Nazi Party drove by the housing projects where the Communists and other anti-Klan activists were congregating. Several marchers began to attack the Klansmens' cars with small wooden sticks or by throwing rocks. According to Frazier Glenn Miller, the first shots were fired from a handgun by an anti-Klan demonstrator. Klansmen and Nazis fired with shotguns, rifles and pistols. Cauce, Waller and Sampson were killed at the scene. Smith was shot in the forehead when she peeked from her hiding place. Eleven others were wounded. One of them, Dr. Michael Nathan, later died from his wounds at a hospital. Most of the armed confrontation was filmed by four local news camera crews.

    Role of the police
    One of the most questionable aspects of the shoot-out is the role of the police. Police would normally have been present at such a rally. However, no police were present, which allowed the assailants to escape. A police detective and a police photographer did follow the Klan and neo-Nazi caravan to the site, but did not attempt to intervene. Edward Dawson, a Klansmen turned police informant,[1] was in the lead car of the caravan.[3] Two days prior to the march, one of the Klansmen went to the police station and obtained a map of the march and the rally. Bernard Butkovich, an undercover agent for the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives (ATFE) later testified that he was aware that Klansmen and members of the American Nazi Party unit he had infiltrated would confront the demonstrators. In a previous testimony, the neo-Nazis claimed the agent encouraged them to carry firearms to the anti-Klan demonstration.

    Aftermath
    Legal proceedings

    Forty Klansmen and neo-Nazis, and several Communist marchers were involved in the shootings; sixteen Klansmen and Nazis were arrested and the six best cases were brought to trial first.[1] Two criminal trials resulted in the acquittal of the defendants by all-white juries.[5] However, in a 1985 civil lawsuit the survivors won a $350,000 judgment against the city, the Ku Klux Klan and the American Nazi Party for violating the civil rights of the demonstrators.

    Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission
    In 2005, Greensboro residents, inspired by post-apartheid South Africa, initiated a Truth and Reconciliation Commission to take public testimony and examine the causes and consequences of the massacre; the efforts of the Commission were officially opposed by the Greensboro City Council.

    The Commission determined that Klan members went to the rally intending to provoke a violent confrontation, and that they fired on demonstrators. In addition, the Commission found that the violent rhetoric of the Communist Workers Party and the Klan contributed in varying degrees to the violence, and that the protesters had not fully secured the community support of the Morningside Homes residents, many of whom did not approve of the protest because of its potential for violent confrontation.

    The Commission also found that the Greensboro Police Department had infiltrated the Klan and, through a paid informant, knew of the white supremacists’ plans and the strong potential for violence. The informant had formerly been on the Federal Bureau of Investigation's payroll but had maintained contact with his agent supervisor. Consequently, the FBI was also aware of the impending armed confrontation.

    The Commission further established that some activists in the crowd fired back after they were attacked.[8] Filmmaker Adam Zucker's 2007 documentary, Greensboro: Closer to the Truth, examines the work of the Greensboro Truth and Reconciliation Commission.


    >>>>>>http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greensboro_massacre
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    WALB newsfilm of the burned ruins of African American churches in Terrell and Lee counties, Georgia, 1962 August and September



    Click here to view the item
    Creator:​
    WALB (Television station : Albany, Ga.)
    Title:​
    WALB newsfilm of the burned ruins of African American churches in Terrell and Lee counties, Georgia, 1962 August and September
    Date:​
    1962
    Description:​

    This silent WALB newsfilm clip from August and September, 1962, shows the ruins of three African American churches from Georgia's Terrell and Lee counties that burned down after they were used for voter registration meetings. The clip begins on Sunday, September 9, 1962, when fire destroyed Mount Olive Baptist and Mount Mary Baptist churches, two churches in Sasser, Terrell County, Georgia. First, the ruins of Mount Olive Baptist Church appear. Ashes cover the church steps, the church bell lies on its side in the rubble, and the brick supports and chimney stand out among the smoldering remains. Next, after a break in the clip, ruins of Mount Mary Baptist Church are also seen, including metal roofing material, two sets of steps, and brick supports. Nearby, African American women and children watch the smoldering piles and comfort one another. Former baseball player Jackie Robinson, who was in Albany when the churches burned, later inspected the sites and served as honorary head of the fundraising effort to rebuild the churches, donating one hundred dollars to the cause. Finally, Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. walks beside the ruins of Shady Grove Baptist Church near Leesburg, in Lee County, on August 15, 1962. Reverends Ralph D. Abernathy and Wyatt T. Walker of the Southern Christian Leadership Conference (SCLC) stand beside other men who observe the ruins. A white man with a notepad appears to be speaking to a gathered crowd. Three of the four cinderblock walls of the church remain, although the east wall and the roof have collapsed. Community members viewed the August 14, 1962 Shady Grove church fire with suspicion, since the church had recently hosted African American voter registration efforts; particularly when the officials who inspected the sites stated that the fires were caused by either lightning or faulty wiring. In response to the suspected arsons at these voter registration meeting sites, the United States Justice Department considered filing a federal suit alleging voter intimidation....

    http://crdl.usg.edu/export/html/ugabma/walb/crdl_ugabma_walb_walb00067.html?Welcome
     
  9. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Intelligence Report, Summer 2009
    Deputy Sheriff's Murder Still Unsolved
    By Larry Keller
    Varnado, La. — Oneal Moore and Creed Rogers made history in 1964 when they became the first black deputy sheriffs in Washington Parish, a notorious Ku Klux stronghold. A year later, Moore was dead, and Rogers was blind in one eye.
    On the night of June 2, 1965, the two men were driving in a patrol car to Moore's home in this village seven miles north of Bogalusa. They planned a late dinner break. Moore's wife of 11 years, Maevella, was cooking catfish.
    The patrol car crossed the railroad tracks on Main Street, less than a mile from Moore's home, when a pickup truck carrying at least three men drew near. A bullet from a hunting rifle ripped into the back of Moore's head, killing him. Rogers survived wounds from shotgun pellets, but was blinded in his right eye. Both men had been deputies for a year and a day.
    Rogers radioed in a description of the pickup — black with a Confederate flag decal on the front bumper. About an hour later and an hour's drive north in Tylertown, Miss., police stopped a truck fitting that description. They arrested the driver, Ernest Ray McElveen, a Bogalusa paper mill worker and part-time insurance salesman. McElveen was well regarded in town. He was also a member of the racist and anti-Semitic Citizens Councils of America and of the even more savagely bigoted National States Rights Party. Police found two pistols in his truck, but no hunting rifle or shotgun.
    [​IMG]
    Oneal Moore

    Two nights after the deputies were shot, six bullets sprayed the home of Washington Parish's chief deputy sheriff, a white man who was investigating Moore's murder. For his part, McElveen was extradited back to Louisiana. He said little, and was released on bond after a few days. He was never prosecuted, and no other arrests were made. James Farmer, the national director of the civil rights organization Congress of Racial Equality, said at the time he suspected the Klan was behind the shootings. A lot of folks in Bogalusa still believe that to be the case and suspect that some old-timers know who did it.
    The FBI has reopened investigations into the shootings three times, most recently in 2007. Reward posters and postcards were placed around the parish offering $40,000 for information leading to the indictment and arrest of anybody responsible for the shootings. And still there have been no arrests...

    ...."Somebody in the know is keeping it a secret," says Maevella Moore, 73, a retired nurse. She lives in the same modest and tidy house that she did in 1965 when she got the news that her husband had been slain. "I need some closure. I'm very frustrated."
    [​IMG]
    Maevella Moore says today that her daughters were robbed.

    The Moores had four daughters. They ranged in age from 9 years to 9 months when he was murdered. "My children have been robbed of so much," she says. "We all have."





    ...The Rev. Coleman Moses isn't surprised nobody has come forth after 44 years to provide information on the killing of Moore and the wounding of Rogers, who died in 2007 at the age of 85. "There are no secrets in Bogalusa," says Moses, a black Baptist minister in Bogalusa. "We cover up stuff we're not going to talk about. If it's racial, there will be no comment from the white community to the point it doesn't exist."
    When McElveen — the prime suspect in the deputies' shootings — died in 2003 at the age of 79, the local newspaper's obituary noted that he was a World War II veteran who had received two Purple Hearts. It mentioned that he had recently retired after 55 years with the same company. But there was not a single word about McElveen's suspected role in the shootings. Not a single comment about it was posted in the online version of the obituary.
    It was as if it never happened.

    http://www.splcenter.org/get-inform.../summer/into-the-wild/deputy-sheriffs-murder-
     
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