Black People : Lessons for African Psychotherapy

Zulile

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Mental Health and Psychotherapy 'through' the Eyes of Culture

Background

How can we begin to see mental health and psychotherapy through the eyes of culture particularly in African settings? Or put differently, what is the role of culture in psychosocial disorders, which help perpetuate patterns of mental health and recovery among Africans?

To see mental health and psychotherapy through the eyes of African culture, we must first know and understand clearly what mental health is all about and how it is conceptualised from the African perspective and afterwards, then begin to appreciate the most appropriate psychotherapeutic approaches to treating these problems.

The Kenya people will say "Shonyala okhumanya inzu yowasio tawe" which literally means that you cannot manage or know better the affairs of the house of your neighbour. According to Fridah Muyale-Manenji (1998), the parable is used when respecting one's privacy. Also, the saying is used when people assume they know what is going on in somebody's home.

http://www.inst.at/trans/15Nr/02_7/idemudia15.htm
 
Zulile said:
Mental Health and Psychotherapy 'through' the Eyes of Culture

Background

How can we begin to see mental health and psychotherapy through the eyes of culture particularly in African settings? Or put differently, what is the role of culture in psychosocial disorders, which help perpetuate patterns of mental health and recovery among Africans?

To see mental health and psychotherapy through the eyes of African culture, we must first know and understand clearly what mental health is all about and how it is conceptualised from the African perspective and afterwards, then begin to appreciate the most appropriate psychotherapeutic approaches to treating these problems.

The Kenya people will say "Shonyala okhumanya inzu yowasio tawe" which literally means that you cannot manage or know better the affairs of the house of your neighbour. According to Fridah Muyale-Manenji (1998), the parable is used when respecting one's privacy. Also, the saying is used when people assume they know what is going on in somebody's home.

http://www.inst.at/trans/15Nr/02_7/idemudia15.htm



Hotep zulie

african american psy.101 entry level as stated by my momma keep your eyes open,your nose clean and your mouth shut. when there was a shortage of time it what verbalized as mind yo own goddam bussiness!! lol
hotep great information as allways! :bowdown:
 
I prefer

Zulile said:
Mental Health and Psychotherapy 'through' the Eyes of Culture

Background

How can we begin to see mental health and psychotherapy through the eyes of culture particularly in African settings? Or put differently, what is the role of culture in psychosocial disorders, which help perpetuate patterns of mental health and recovery among Africans?

To see mental health and psychotherapy through the eyes of African culture, we must first know and understand clearly what mental health is all about and how it is conceptualised from the African perspective and afterwards, then begin to appreciate the most appropriate psychotherapeutic approaches to treating these problems.

The Kenya people will say "Shonyala okhumanya inzu yowasio tawe" which literally means that you cannot manage or know better the affairs of the house of your neighbour. According to Fridah Muyale-Manenji (1998), the parable is used when respecting one's privacy. Also, the saying is used when people assume they know what is going on in somebody's home.

http://www.inst.at/trans/15Nr/02_7/idemudia15.htm
Dr. Jewel Laery, Amos Wilson, Marimba Ani, Frances Cress Welsing and Jwanzaa Kunjufu,

Now since the Kenyans are so good with them sayings why won't they use their own medecine and stop choppin up one another.
and making the Illuminati happy!:SuN041:
 
sister zulile

Zulile said:
Mental Health and Psychotherapy 'through' the Eyes of Culture

Background

How can we begin to see mental health and psychotherapy through the eyes of culture particularly in African settings? Or put differently, what is the role of culture in psychosocial disorders, which help perpetuate patterns of mental health and recovery among Africans?

To see mental health and psychotherapy through the eyes of African culture, we must first know and understand clearly what mental health is all about and how it is conceptualised from the African perspective and afterwards, then begin to appreciate the most appropriate psychotherapeutic approaches to treating these problems.

The Kenya people will say "Shonyala okhumanya inzu yowasio tawe" which literally means that you cannot manage or know better the affairs of the house of your neighbour. According to Fridah Muyale-Manenji (1998), the parable is used when respecting one's privacy. Also, the saying is used when people assume they know what is going on in somebody's home.

http://www.inst.at/trans/15Nr/02_7/idemudia15.htm

Check out the video explanation by Dr. Ernie Smith. he begins by talking about how this has been studied since 1973 in the context of analyzing "Ebonics" in relation to mental health.

I also would refer to Dr. Welsing's Theory of Color Confrontation and the effects of "white supremacy.

 
Zulile said:
Mental Health and Psychotherapy 'through' the Eyes of Culture

Background

How can we begin to see mental health and psychotherapy through the eyes of culture particularly in African settings? Or put differently, what is the role of culture in psychosocial disorders, which help perpetuate patterns of mental health and recovery among Africans?

To see mental health and psychotherapy through the eyes of African culture, we must first know and understand clearly what mental health is all about and how it is conceptualised from the African perspective and afterwards, then begin to appreciate the most appropriate psychotherapeutic approaches to treating these problems.

The Kenya people will say "Shonyala okhumanya inzu yowasio tawe" which literally means that you cannot manage or know better the affairs of the house of your neighbour. According to Fridah Muyale-Manenji (1998), the parable is used when respecting one's privacy. Also, the saying is used when people assume they know what is going on in somebody's home.

http://www.inst.at/trans/15Nr/02_7/idemudia15.htm
if your neighbor cuts the clitoris off his daughter, you do what......?
 

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