Black People : last poet homeless

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by jamesfrmphilly, Mar 25, 2011.

  1. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    This Sunday in Harlem, Sunday, rapper Doug E. Fresh, comedian Paul Mooney and others will host a benefit concert. But the beneficiary is someone most of us would never expect.

    Abiodun Oyewole, member of the legendary hip-hop group, Last Poets is facing the very real possibility of losing his home. In an interview with New York Daily News, Oyewole explained that despite what notions other may have of his living circumstances, he has been struggling:

    “I’ve been making most of my money working for arts education agencies, but that money is all dried up in the city. Consequently, I do not have the funds I normally have. So things got slack. I had to borrow money. Now I’m close to losing my home.”

    With New York City government has been cutting back their programs in the arts and education, the reductions in funds to city schools have eliminated a large part of Oyewole’s income.

    It’s a long journey for the hip-hop legend who was part of the genre’s founding but has contributed also to its modern past. The Last Poets were born in Harlem’s Mount Morris Park (now renamed Marcus Garvey Park) in the spring of 1968. In the last few years, the Last Poets have appeared on albums for artist like Common, very much still in the game. Most recently, their work has been heard on Kanye West’s “Lost In The World.” Though the years, the group produced hits such as “White Man’s Got A God Complex,” “Ho Chi Minh,” “When The Revolution Comes,” and anthology of others.

    Now, at 63 and in dire financial straits the hip-hop legend worries he will lose the Morningside Drive apartment he has lived in for 35 years. Oyewole has shared his home with open arms over the years, hosting his “Open House Sundays” series for poets and entertainers every week since 1979.

    The Sunday benefit will be held at the National Black Theatre, 2131 Fifth Ave. in Harlem. Tickets are $25 in advance and will be $30 at the door.


    http://clutchmagonline.com/newsgoss...is-harlem-home/comment-page-1/#comment-106407
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    We have no Black economic Collective in any of the 50 states, or in PR and the Virgin Islands,

    s this is not only , and has been the fate of any greart black artists but will be the future as well!

    Look at what is happening to the "National Black Theater"
    look at what happened to Gil Scott

    How many great blues, jazz and R and B artists over the past 25 years

    have we seen decline into destitution,
    because there is a generation that does not really care about these folks until it is Black history month, or some Biopic movie or Youtube is made about them?

    the hip hop generation, whose stars make mega billions, do not have

    .000000000000000000007 % of the commitment to the Black community that

    this brother had.



    So please do not call the

    Last Poets, "Hip Hop"
     
  3. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa and Peace and Love!




    .......Much success to the benefit drive, Abiodun Oyewole certainly was a benefit to us...


     
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