Black People : largest national survey conducted on African-Americans

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by oldsoul, Jun 30, 2008.

  1. OldSoul

    OldSoul Permanent Black Man PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Radio One releases largest national survey conducted on African-Americans

    (June 27, 2008) According to one of the largest-ever studies of Black America, 70 percent of African Americans already have a plan for their future. The survey was released today by Radio One, Inc., the study's sponsor, and Yankelovich, the Chapel Hill-based research firm.
    The survey of 3,400 African Americans between 13 and 74 years of age, the only study to include Black teens and seniors, found also that 54 percent were optimistic about their future and 60 percent believe "things are getting better for me."
    The study provides the most detailed snap shot of African American life in the United States today, and finds strong group identity across age and income brackets. It also discloses a comprehensive and nuanced look at how African Americans feel about many aspects of life in America, and cautions against a simplistic reading of Black America as a monolithic group. In fact, it shows that Blacks are divided evenly on how they liked to be described, with 42 percent (who are more likely to be affluent) preferring to be called "Black" and 44 percent preferring "African American."
    The survey, representing nearly 30 million Black Americans, identified eleven specific segments within Black America today, ranging from Connected Black Teens, Digital Networkers and Black Onliners at the younger end, to Faith Fulfills, Broadcast Blacks and Boomer Blacks at the older end.
    The segmentation analysis identifies differences in Black America regarding everything from what it means to be Black today, perceptions about African American history and expectations for the future of Blacks, to consumer trends, media preferences and confidence in key institutions (such as the church, government, financial services companies and the media).
    For instance, among the Connected Black Teens segment, 25 percent are saving to start a business. Yet, among Digital Networkers, the majority of whom are in their 20s, 45 percent are already saving for retirement.
    "While people are less inclined these days to think that all Blacks are the same, they really do not understand the diversity within the African American community," Catherine Hughes, Founder and Chairperson of the Board, said. "Blacks share many commonalities regardless of age, income and geography, but there are also differences -- that suggest a new understanding of the past and a more optimistic sense of the future. We're confident that Black Americans -- and all Americans -- will find the results of the survey useful and in some cases surprising, given perceptions about Black life that are still pervasive in our country."
    Alfred C. Liggins, CEO and President, explained that Radio One commissioned Yankelovich to conduct the study to learn more about what Black Americans are thinking today about all aspects of their lives, including their hopes for the future, their fears, the institutions they love and hate, how they get information, whether they are plugged into the Internet, and what they want for themselves and their children.
    "We wanted to know in detail who we are, what we want and where we are going," Mr. Liggins said.
    What is Black America today? The average household of those surveyed has three people in it, half of whom live in a single family home, one-third in apartments, one-third in the suburbs and half in cities. Among 29 to 74 year-olds, one-third are married. 61 percent of Black Americans are parents, five percent of 13 to 17 year-olds are parents, and half of all parents are single parents.
    From an educational and economic standpoint, 34 percent of those surveyed who are 18 or older have some college or a two-year degree, 21 percent have a BA or higher, 40 percent have an annual income under $25,000 (20 percent of whom are retired), and one-third more than $50,000.
    The digital divide has faded. 68 percent of those surveyed are online (compared to 71 percent of all Americans), and two-thirds of them shop online. Among Black teens, over 90 percent are online. Blacks who live in the south are least likely to be online (63 percent).
    Black identity remains strong across all age and economic groups. While 56 percent of those surveyed have "all" or "almost" all Black friends, only 30 percent said they prefer being around people of the same race. Black solidarity too is strong across all groups, with 88 percent saying they have enormous respect for the opinions of their elders (84 percent among teens). While 71 percent overall said they believe Blacks need to stick together to achieve gains for their community, only 54 percent of teens concurred.
    Discrimination remains a very real part of Black life in America. While 24 percent said they had been personally discriminated against in the past three months, 82 percent said they believe it is "important for parents to prepare their children for prejudice." 67 percent overall said they believe the history of slavery is a key way in which Blacks are different from other groups, but one-third also say that too much emphasis is put on the oppression of Blacks.
    While 72 percent of Blacks say they know how to have fun and 60 percent think things are getting better for them, many often feel stressed (33 percent). Money is the greatest cause of stress (53 percent) followed by the well being of kids (49 percent) and health (40 percent). While only 3 in 10 feel financially secure, 8 in 10 pay their bills each month.
    Among other findings in the report:
    -- 83 percent of those surveyed have health insurance, a majority (66 percent of women and 52 percent of men) has family doctors, and 40 percent of Blacks who go online search the internet for health and medical information.
    -- 83 percent of those surveyed describe themselves as Christian, though only 41 percent go to church at least once a week. 70 percent of women and 59 percent of men believe that faith in God is more likely to help them recover from a serious illness.
    -- 72 percent want to learn more about how to invest. 50 percent believe banks and other financial institutions do not understand their needs; and only 8 percent trust credit card companies.
    -- 21 percent shop for fun frequently and 19 percent said they have to have what they like even if it costs more than they would like to spend.
    -- Blacks are wary of many American institutions. They have the highest level of trust in the education system and Black media to treat them and their families fairly (30 percent) compared to 24 percent for the healthcare system, 12 to 16 percent for police, government, and mainstream media and 8 percent for credit card companies.
    -- Other media highlights include: 84 percent of households have cable, 81 percent of those surveyed watch Black TV channels weekly, 87 percent listen to radio in a typical week (only 16 percent listen to Satellite radio), 64 percent watch news or news magazines and 50 percent watch Court shows (compared to 41 percent for sports and 46 percent for entertainment)
    -- Blacks are not satisfied with how they are portrayed by the media. Only 29 percent agree that the mainstream media portrays Blacks in a positive light -- compared to 50 percent who do not relate to the way Blacks are portrayed on most Black TV shows. Two-thirds believe there should be more television shows that focus on Blacks. Forty percent think Black TV is reinforcing a negative stereotype of Blacks.

    For more information about the Black America Today study, please visit http://www.blackamericastudy.com.​
     
  2. roarin1

    roarin1 Banned MEMBER

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    Yeah....heard about this. Curious though.....ain't nobody asked ME squat.
     
  3. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Just who is this company called "Yankelovich"?

    Well nobody came to me either or asked me jack! Now lets look at this for what it is. Personally I think this is a bunch of bull---- and is more of a tool for companies to use as a marketing base. I don't know who Alfred Liggins is or why he would go to some "JEWS" (Yankelovich) to have them do some research on African people talking that garbage "We wanted to know in detail who we are, what we want and where we are going." I haven't read anything in this report about the segment of our people who are totally dissatisfied with America and no longer desire to be here. I haven't read anything in this report of the percentage who recognize the educational system as harming us through their mis-education. I haven't read anything in here about the amount of grass-roots organizations that have been springing up around this country as a means of countering what we see in the system as detrimental to our existence and future. I could go on and on about this but I think you see my point. Are we being criminalized by the system? Are our youth being targeted judicially for the penal system?

    I could rip all into this because it is confusing...such as;While 56 percent of those surveyed have "all" or "almost" all Black friends, only 30 percent said they prefer being around people of the same race. 56+30 is 86 percent...what did the other 14% say?...and are they saying that 70% prefer being around white people or other groups than their own? Sorry, I can't give any validity to this report as nothing other than an Americanized/Negro based propaganda report structured for white America businesses.
     
  4. roarin1

    roarin1 Banned MEMBER

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    Exactly.

    As 'good' colored folk and capitalist do.....by seeking to catapult themselves above the poverty tax bracket, they must first crap all over corporate amerikkkas favorite punching bag....the black community.

    Not unlike bob johnson, cathy hughes has sought to further divide the black community by suggesting that 'daze good ones and daze bad ones.' See mazza weez ain't like dem other ones dat don't wanna take yalls names....weez got hour eyes set on'a bitnas just like yalls---suh.'

    Somebody else said this much better than ME....'stepin fetchit-cow-tow cow-tow, stepin fetchet.'

    Oh yeah---the woman is completely pathetic, because she has obviously straight-way forgotten all about her so-called efforts concerning the 'no urban dictate.'

    Pathetic.
     
  5. anAfrican

    anAfrican Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    34 hundred out of how many millions?
     
  6. Jahari Kavi

    Jahari Kavi Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    so basically they just tried to point out our differences to separate us............once again who performed this study?????
     
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