Health and Wellness : Kohl...[for the eyes]

Discussion in 'Black Health and Wellness' started by noor100, Nov 24, 2011.

  1. noor100

    noor100 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    For desert dwellers,Kohl helps to protect the eye area from dryness,cuts down the glare of the sun,and acts as an antibacterial.

    Along with henna,kohl has been part of the beauty regimen of women since the dawn of history.
    [Meaning pure kohl...not the manufactured kind which may contain harmful chemicals]
    http://www.middleeasternmall.com/aswad-kohl-powder-eyes-black-p-3193.html
     
  2. noor100

    noor100 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Ancient Egyptian Eye Makeup​


    By Judith Illes

    Gaze at the myriad portraits of ancient Egyptians and what looks back? Consistent meticulously and beautifully outlined and ornamented eyes. It is virtually impossible to find a portrait of an ancient Egyptian whose eyes are not decorated. During all periods and dynasties, eye makeup was a daily prerequisite for both men and women.

    Although we know the Egyptians possessed the equivalent of our rouge, lip-gloss and nail polish, these were used only upon occasion, apparently as a matter of personal preference, style and fashion. The ancient Egyptian tradition of outlining the eyes with pigment to create an almond or feline shape and the importance placed upon this practice, however, transcends the Western concept of eye makeup. "Makeup" to modern Westernized ears has the ring of something frivolous, something optional. Although cosmetics were certainly used for the purpose of beautification, in ancient Egypt, eye makeup did more than paint a pretty face.

    As we have seen to be typical of the ancient Egyptians, they took a truly holistic approach to the concept of eye makeup. Not only was it decorative and ornamental, the practice also served medicinal, magical and spiritual practices.

    The Egyptians used two types of eye makeup:

    · Udju was made from green malachite (green ore of copper) from Sinai. Sinai and its mines were considered under the spiritual dominion of Hathor, ancient goddess of beauty, joy, love and women. She bore the epithet "Lady of Malachite."

    · Mesdemet, a dark gray ore of lead, was derived from either stibnite (antimony sulphide) or, more typically, galena (lead sulphide.) Galena was found around Aswan and on the Red Sea Coast. It was also among the materials brought back by Pharaoh Hatshepsut's famed expedition to Punt and was given in tribute by Asiatic nomads.

    The packaging and preparation of eye makeup was quite different from what we are used to today. Today, we have the choice of liquid, powdered or cake eye makeup. If you find yourself all thumbs at applying liquid eyeliner, no problem, you can just purchase a pencil instead. We have a vast array of colors available to us. Although the nuances of color are virtually endless, very rarely do we know precisely what our makeup is made from, what's actually in the makeup or how it was made. Once the product is purchased, it's ready to be used: all you have to do is open the package and apply the stuff to your eyes.

    In ancient Egypt, preparations were a little more extensive. The cosmetic material had to be powdered on a palette and then this powder mixed with a substance, (analysis indicates that these were usually ointments derived from animal fat) to make the powder adhere to the eye.
     
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