Black Spirituality Religion : Kirikou and the Sorceress

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Alexandra, Sep 6, 2009.

  1. Alexandra

    Alexandra Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    [​IMG]



    Just finished watching this and I am speechless. I want to be like one of those white tourists and clap, looking both delighted and surprised when the African plane they are flying in lands safely.


    The story of Kirikou and the Sorceress is based on a tale from a West Africa. Kirikou speaks to his mother from within her womb, demanding to be born. Taken aback by such boldness, his mother tells him to go ahead and birth himself. He duly follows the command and emerges walking, talking and looking at the world with a mind uncluttered by myth, superstition and prejudice. Such clarity provides him with a wisdom desperately needed by the members of his village because they fear a sorceress who has derived them both of water and their men-folk. Kirikou undertakes a perilous journey in order to discover the secret of the sorceress’s power and to free the village from her spell.

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    Like any good fable, this one works on many levels - political allegory, social commentary, and a teaching aid - and its narrative captivates audiences of all ages. Taking the bare bones of the original African tale, the script takes the simple questions a child asks and contrasts them with the preconceptions of adulthood. The story is told from the child's point of view - Kirikou narrates; his voice full of innocent surprise and practical determination. Kirikou constantly asks, 'Why is the sorceress wicked?' The adults around him are happy to provide a list of reasons all based on conjecture and misplaced conviction. Kirikou however cannot relate to such supposition, he wants to know the truth.


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    In the original tale, Kirikou slays the sorceress but in this version his search for the truth and understanding is paramount, for it is the only way that his people will truly be free. Even when the villagers turn their anger on him, Kirikou stands firm, believing that ignorance must be challenged. The film argues against falling prey to superstition/relying on talismans, and instead it champions individual responsibility and action.

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    Like Kirikou himself, the film races along at an extraordinary pace, bursting with ingenious ideas, and posing all manner of questions. Whereas the adults around him are all trapped in their own prejudices and superstitions, the newborn Kirikou brings a child's fresh perspective to the problems faced by the village, and his intelligence and inquisitiveness mark him out as the natural inheritor of his grandfather's (and indeed his mother's) wisdom. Kirikou's story illustrates (without ever preaching) the value of innocence and intellectual curiosity, the unimportance of size, and the need at times to empathise with, or even love, one's enemy. It also demonstrates vividly that the best way to resolve a conflict is not to keep on fighting to the end, but to investigate and address its underlying causes, however thorny.

    A must watch film.

    A
     
  2. queentswana

    queentswana Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This will go to the top of my "Must see movies" ...thanks for the info.
     
  3. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I will do a goggle type search to find

    DEFINITELY a "Must Watch"....

    Now....where to find it :thinking:
    Is this out in video you think:?:


    M.E

    :hearts2:
     
  4. Amnat77

    Amnat77 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    [ame="http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nOv53wkorH8"]YouTube - Kirikou and the Sorceress - pt. 1 (english version)[/ame]
     
  5. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  6. King Tubbs

    King Tubbs Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I saw this a few years ago, it is truly a great cartoon.

    Its refreshing to see a cartoon about Africa that actually features African people and not singing animals with American accents and no humans in sight!

    There was a sequel called Kirikou and the Wild Animals, but (to my knowledge) it was never translated into English (its originally in French).
     
  7. Ikoro

    Ikoro Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It was translated, at least the subtitles are available on the net.

    One.

    - Ikoro

    ps.: Am I the only one who feels ambivalent about this cartoo? Half naked Sisters running around, a young baby running around naked. I mean, in my village we never really ran around naked. Why they had to portray it like that? **** whites. In any case, nice flick...
     
  8. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This was a great film! I got the "special edition" which included another video called Princes and Princesses" that was refreshing as well.

    One thing I got out of Kirikou and the Sorceress is validation for my knowing that "hurt people, hurt people". That was one underlying message in the end.

    I also thought...THIS is the type of cartoons that are healthy for our children to watch.

    Ikoro...regarding the nakedness....I too wondered about that portrayal of Afreekan people and how we live. It was a bit distracting and I imagine for younger minds, it could be MORE distracting then it was for me. Somebody would have a lot of explaining to do, yet, towards that end, it could provided more room for education and interaction with parents and children.

    All in all....I think is is a BLACK educational tool for parents with young children who are interested in healthy cartoons AND interested in exposing them to a different cultural thought and behaviors.

    Thanks again SiS Alexandra for sharing!


    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
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