Black Hebrew Israelites : King Solomon was Black, according to King Solomon?

Discussion in 'Black Hebrew Israelites Study Group' started by UBNaturally, Mar 5, 2016.

  1. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Have been wanting to get some clarity on this view as some within the Israelite faith have often been noticed to use Songs to claim Solomon was "Black".




    Sng 1:5
    I am black, but comely, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, as the tents of Kedar, as the curtains of Solomon.


    • And also want to ask about the notion that Judah was "Black" by using the content within the writings of "Judah mourneth"




    Jer 14:2
    Judah mourneth, and the gates thereof languish; they are black unto the ground; and the cry of Jerusalem is gone up.



    Again, not sure of this but would like for a further expounding of claiming "Solomon" was "black" based on Songs 1:5 and that "Judah" was "black" based on Jeramiah 14:2
     
  2. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I can touch upon the first question a little bit. But I will come back to listen to the videos.

    Solomon was very deep and very wise and his writings reflect this attribute. In order to understand that one scripture, other scriptures must be also considered. but in regards to that scripture, I believe Solomon was addressing issues of Colorism and Color Supremacy, and not necessarily about himself. In other scriptures it becomes clear [to me anyway] that Solomon addressed how dark skinned black girls/women were being oppressed by other people. And this is crucial due to his own mother. Solomons writings need to be compared and contrasted with other writings, not only from the Bible, but based on the presence of HAMITIC origins in the land of HAM of whom the Israelite people were intermixed with in their origins!

    The name and history of his mother,BATHSHEBA, would be the more accurate way to understand that Solomon definitely would have expressed HAMITIC TRAITS and may have been more darker skinned than the common Israelites who would have been more defined as brown skinned. The root name 'SHEBA' [var. Shuah; Bathshuah] means 'BLACK' [ie. BLACK BERRIES, MULBERRIES...]. Also, the Levite priesthood wrote Solomon up later due to his actions of which correlate to his dealings with his mother and the Hittite people of which she had dealings with prior to her marriage to David. She was married to an Hittite man and later, Solomon bonded with these people for which the Levite priesthood wrote him up on because they were not suppose to be bonding with these kinds of people. Why? Because they worshipped White Supremacy.

    David had a problem with Hittite people for this very reason. But after David's death, his son bent to the ways of his mother and later, this caused problems for the Israelite people. There are so many other references that go along with the scripture in Songs of Solomon but, this is my first response. Also, in this very Book, Solomon specifically details other 'TRAITS' as well that confirm that Israelite people have HAMITIC TRAITS [original Seth traits] and that correlate to Solomon himself, who yes, would be a black man! Namely, Solomon brings out the fact that Jesus would have 'BUSHY' hair.

    But in Jer 14:2, it is not talking about Judah or the descendants of Judah as being black skinned. this is in reference to disease, famine, starvation. It has nothing to do with black or African traits.
     
  3. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Enjoyed... seems one has chewed on this as well, thank you.

    "But in Jer 14:2, it is not talking about Judah or the descendants of Judah as being black skinned. this is in reference to disease, famine, starvation. It has nothing to do with black or African traits."

    I concur.


    As for the Solomon/Black complexion connection, I could not find any reference to where any writings mention him as being dark complexion or black.

    If you have this context, share indeed.


    Respect
     
  4. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Forgot I had posted this until you mentioned it.

    I actually was about to post a breakdown of this, but held onto it until others were able to share their own findings, ideas and interpretations.
     
  5. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    yes, I am looking forward to coming back to this thread. I'm going to look through my note tonight.
     
  6. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Excellent... will start it off so we can look at the content and context with an unbiased eye.

    Sng 1:2
    Let him kiss me with the kisses of his mouth: for thy love is better than wine.

    Within the first two lines of Song of Songs (of Solomon), it clearly notes a person that is referring to a male kissing them.

    If this is Solomon writing this, Solomon is desiring of a "him" to kiss them with their mouth.
    Was Solomon homoerotic? With 1000+ women, this is doubtful.

    This would suggest nothing more that the author was someone else, probably one of Solomon's many women talking about him.


    Sng 1:4
    Draw me, we will run after thee: the king hath brought me into his chambers: we will be glad and rejoice in thee, we will remember thy love more than wine: the upright love thee.

    This identifies someone speaking of the king. If this was Solomon, why would Solomon refer to himself in this writing? Does not make sense for some to claim that this is Solomon writing this.

    Sng 1:5
    I am black, but comely, O ye daughters of Jerusalem, as the tents of Kedar, as the curtains of Solomon.


    This is a key passage that some black supremacy movements attempt to use to confuse those that either don't read well, or don't read much for comprehension.

    Followed by this, which they typically do not share often...

    Sng 1:6
    Look not upon me, because I am black, because the sun hath looked upon me: my mother's children were angry with me; they made me the keeper of the vineyards; but mine own vineyard have I not kept.

    The story of Cinderella comes to mind. Cinderella is said to be a rendition of an older tale from Egypt:
    Rhodopis

    But here one can read that the writer claims to be darker skinned, but comely (ok to look at; not ugly).


    Sng 1:12
    While the king sitteth at his table, my spikenard sendeth forth the smell thereof.

    The king referring to Solomon again, and the flowers that filled his quarters with a nice aroma that was given to him by her.

    Sng 1:13
    A bundle of myrrh is my wellbeloved unto me; he shall lie all night betwixt my breasts.

    Again, this is a female writing this, as a man would not refer to their wellbeloved as a "he", nor would they imply themselves to have breasts.


    Here comes the switch...

    Sng 4:5
    Thy two breasts are like two young roes that are twins, which feed among the lilies.

    Chapter four seemingly is a male writing of or to a female, but written by a female.

    These are two young "roes" side by side...
    upload_2016-5-17_9-48-6.png

    Some serious poetry going on here.

    In Chapter 5 one can see the apparent transition as the female writer comes out of character...

    Sng 5:1
    I am come into my garden, my sister, my spouse: I have gathered my myrrh with my spice; I have eaten my honeycomb with my honey; I have drunk my wine with my milk: eat, O friends; drink, yea, drink abundantly, O beloved.

    Sng 5:2
    I sleep, but my heart waketh: it is the voice of my beloved that knocketh, saying, Open to me, my sister, my love, my dove, my undefiled: for my head is filled with dew, and my locks with the drops of the night.

    Sng 5:3
    I have put off my coat; how shall I put it on? I have washed my feet; how shall I defile them?

    Sng 5:4
    My beloved put in his hand by the hole of the door, and my bowels were moved for him.

    Sng 5:5
    I rose up to open to my beloved; and my hands dropped with myrrh, and my fingers with sweet smelling myrrh, upon the handles of the lock.

    Sng 5:6
    I opened to my beloved; but my beloved had withdrawn himself, and was gone: my soul failed when he spake: I sought him, but I could not find him; I called him, but he gave me no answer.

    Sng 5:7
    The watchmen that went about the city found me, they smote me, they wounded me; the keepers of the walls took away my veil from me.

    Sng 5:8
    I charge you, O daughters of Jerusalem, if ye find my beloved, that ye tell him, that I am sick of love.

    Notice the switch between her writing about her beloved and what he would say and how he would be towards her.

    Seems to me this woman grew tired of the love games of this man.

    "I can't love you, cause I hate you, I can't hate you cause I love you"


    Then she goes on to poetically write about her beloved...

    Sng 5:10
    My beloved is white and ruddy, the chiefest among ten thousand.

    Sng 5:11
    His head is as the most fine gold, his locks are bushy, and black as a raven.

    Sng 5:12
    His eyes are as the eyes of doves by the rivers of waters, washed with milk, and fitly set.

    Sng 5:13
    His cheeks are as a bed of spices, as sweet flowers: his lips like lilies, dropping sweet smelling myrrh.

    Sng 5:14
    His hands are as gold rings set with the beryl: his belly is as bright ivory overlaid with sapphires.


    Her beloved, who was chiefest among ten thousand, was "white and ruddy".
    Meaning white with red coming through, which some of the Hebrew Israelites like to claim of "Esau", erroneously.

    But the writer not only claims her beloved is white and ruddy (reddish/blood showing through pale complexion), she also mentions his belly is as bright ivory. This mention of ivory and sapphire could have been a reference to his clothes and attire, but just pointing it out non-the-less.

    upload_2016-5-17_10-4-0.png

    White and ruddy + ivory belly overlaid with sapphires

    upload_2016-5-17_10-14-17.png
    This is probably what you would be looking at for those stretching to claim the description is of a "black" man.


    But the female writer still doesn't stop there...

    Sng 5:15
    His legs are as pillars of marble, set upon sockets of fine gold: his countenance is as Lebanon, excellent as the cedars.

    Legs like pillars of marble?
    What does marble look like?


    [​IMG]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marble

    Why not pillars of sand or pillars of ebony?

    The writer seems to be consistent in this "pale/white" characterization of her lover, which many allude to as being King Solomon. This could or could not be about Solomon, but that is what is claimed.


    In chapter 7, the body parts are becoming more of the poetry within the erotic nature.

    Sng 7:1
    How beautiful are thy feet with shoes, O prince's daughter! the joints of thy thighs are like jewels, the work of the hands of a cunning workman.

    This again, is a female writing this...
    Referring to man and how they would think of the woman's hind quarters.

    Sng 7:3
    Thy two breasts are like two young roes that are twins.

    Here is the roe reference to nipples and breasts again

    Sng 7:4
    Thy neck is as a tower of ivory; thine eyes like the fishpools in Heshbon, by the gate of Bathrabbim: thy nose is as the tower of Lebanon which looketh toward Damascus.

    And the ivory used to reference the white neck of the female.


    So to sum this up, Solomon doesn't reference the claims of him looking "black", if anything it almost does the opposite.
     
  7. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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  8. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I haven't put my hand on my notes yet. but just right off, the commentaries that I've read about the Hebrew Judaic translation for the word white in this text, does not refer to 'white' in all of the context, but in one passage, the original word for 'white' referred to 'being pure' and not the color and in another passage, it did refer to 'the color white', but I just need to get back to post my references.

    Also, the word 'ruddy' means 'reddish-brown' and correlates to a darker brown like wood brown. White Europeans are not generally connected to this word, 'ruddy'.

    All in all, this part of the Bible that you are referring too, I've done alot of research, but just need to get my references. Right off though, this part of the Bible like the whole, has a deep, deep, message. Songs of Solomon is written sort like today's poetry and carries deep meanings. Solomon was scripted to very wise and this writings is one example. Yes, it does strike at human traits of the prophetic Great Prophet, which would later be Jesus. Yes, it does talk about the dominant traits of the Abra-hamitic people that the Hebrew Israelites were
     
  9. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    i'm not able to respond like I want to because, I have moved!-- and all my things are well, everywhere!
     
  10. UBNaturally

    UBNaturally Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The point of posting this is that there is no evidence to the effect of claiming the text articulates the color or complexion of Solomon, and if it did, the text presented (white and ruddy) is that which does.

    Hence, those that would attempt to use Songs as proof, would actually be doing so in er and opening up a door to do just the opposite.

    But then for the sake of debate... how can someone be "pure and reddish brown"?
    What does that signify?

    What I am asking is:

    • what does the compounded terms of "pure" and "reddish brown" refer to?

    But being that one cannot respond to this now, take your time and respond when one can.
    I have formulated an idea, but would like to hear what one has as well.

    Respect
     
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