Black People : KEY TO CLOSING EDUCATION GAP FOUND?

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Kemetstry, Apr 11, 2013.

  1. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Study May Have Found Key To Closing The Gap Between White And Black Graduation Rates
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    The chips are stacked against black males trying to make it through school and experts have pointed to everything from the Great Recession to the 1980s crack epidemic as the reason why. But a recent study by Terrell Strayhorn, associate professor of educational studies at The Ohio State University, says there may be another factor at play.

    “For many black men, talent and high school success are not the only things they need to succeed when they attend a predominantly white university," Strayhorn says, pointing to a third factor -- grit.

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  2. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The chips are stacked against black males trying to make it through school and experts have pointed to everything from the Great Recession to the 1980s crack epidemic as the reason why. But a recent study by Terrell Strayhorn, associate professor of educational studies at The Ohio State University, says there may be another factor at play.
    “For many black men, talent and high school success are not the only things they need to succeed when they attend a predominantly white university," Strayhorn says, pointing to a third factor -- grit.
    According to psychologists, "grit" is defined as a dedication to pursuing and achieving a goal, whatever the obstacles and failures along the way. In his study of 140 black male, first-generation college students who were enrolled full time at a large, predominantly white public university, Strayhorn found that grit affected college grades for almost as much as high school GPA and ACT scores.
    “Despite where they begin in terms of college readiness, black males who show more grit than their peers earn better grades in college," he concluded in this study, which appears online in the Journal of African American Studies. Even after taking into account factors that may affect grades, such as prior achievement, age, year in school, transfer status, how engaged they are in university activities and their degree aspirations, the grit-to-success correlation remained true.
    In 2010, a 50-state report by the Schott Foundation for Public Education revealed that only 47 percent of black male students graduated high school, much less made it on to college, nationwide. Last year, the same organization released a report stating that while more than half of the young black men who graduated high school in 2010 earned their diploma in four years, it would still take nearly 50 years for black men to graduate at the same rate as their white male counterparts.
    Strayhorn says that a closer look at the role grit plays in college degree attainment may be the key to turning the tide.




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  3. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I hate to disagree but I must. The factors of ones ability to succeed are often realities that are unseen, such as self esteem, pride, motivation, aspiration and dignity. Let me explain. I remember when I quit school in the 10th grade to go in the Marines. No matter how hard I tried or studied, I just couldn't pass mt GED. I was passing every subject except math with flying colors. I tried three times with the same results. Finally I just gave up. As fate would have it, once I went to prison I ran into a math teacher who was black and I told him that I couldn't learn the stuff and of my prior efforts. He immediately said to me and the class: "What do you mean you can't pass this stuff....man this was the stuff your ancestors were doing. (First time I ever heard that!) Then he went on to the great pyramids and then went into how the Greeks stole the math that was attributed to them.

    This was something I had never heard before. When I was taking college prep during my years of the 7,8, and 9 grades, I was always told that the Greeks and Romans did all of this...which was akin to sticking a needle in my brain.(I didn't want to learn it). Now here was a man who not only inspired me with reflections of myself and our people, but he motivated me and instilled a sense of connection and history and pride, I began to see myself as an extension of GREAT people and came to feel that "if they could do it, I could do it". In essence, he removed that subconscious learning block that was placed in me during my early learning years. After that, I was only in his class for three months before I took the test...and math became my second highest score. I realized then that there was more to our learning process than what we were given in school and "how they expected us to learn". There were unseen factors also...actors that in many instances are more important than those that we see.
     
  4. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    So, the factors which you outlined in the 1st paragraph, which could also be viewed as components of grit. You had a psychological block to. Until, one of your teachers instilled a sense of self esteem and racial pride in you? You are agreeing with the article.





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  5. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    I don't define "grit" in that manner. If "GRIT" is defined as a dedication to pursuing and achieving a goal, whatever the obstacles and failures along the way, then it doesn't apply to me or my writing. I was not dedicated to achieving a goal, I gave up. I admit that I was in the class as a means of getting out of my cell (free time).
     
  6. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    No I don't agree with the article at all. I gave up trying. It was not my intent to really continue trying to do anything. I merely attended school as a means of obtaining a little free time out of my cell. What happened in the process was that my mind was freed from the prison it was locked in by the truth concerning who we were and by extension, who I was. If grit is defined as a dedication to pursuing and achieving a goal, whatever the obstacles and failures along the way, then I didn't qualify according to that definition. The teacher merely instilled in me via the truth what white people have instilled in them by the lies of their greatness that they were raised to believe as being true. This in essence means that we start off our education already handicapped since everything great that we are taught or conditioned by does not look like us or reflect our reality.
     
  7. chuck

    chuck Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I've only browsed over what you're written, and I'll reply further about that too, but it does seem there's a bad tendancy for too many of our relations to believe all that is required is to send their kids to the 'right' schools, and the 'wrong' ones are blamed for why the young black janes or johns can't read or write, let alone don't aspire to be any or no better than some black high school dropout /turned gang member ad naseum....

    Instead the norm (not the exception) was the whole adult black community did feel and think it also was in their best interests to help pass along their ethics/morals/etc., to all of the young people in our midst, and that spirit has been waning, i. e., since the federal court backed desegregation of this nation's public schools etc.

    As was true let us not allow that to happen again: I. e., have our efforts undermined to advance somebody else's agendas....

    FYI....
     
  8. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I think it is more than just "grit".

    You have to light the fire in a child.
    Instill a love of learning.
     
  9. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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  10. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    You can disagree all you want. But you laid out the facts for your own self to see. It just took you a while to become motivated






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