Kenya : Kenya signs infrastructure, energy deals worth $5 bln with China

Aug 30, 2013
11
1
:huh2: ... Thanks for correcting the double post without a reply, and then posting your reply above.
Oddly, I never pushed reply. It just posted.
Here's a better understanding ... The term, especially, implies a non use of force, while describing pillage as the act of looting or plundering.

Definition of PILLAGE

1

: the act of looting or plundering especially in war
2

: something taken as booty
Regardless of our disagreement on the usage of the word pillage, I do comprehend your usage of the word. Hence, I used it in my follow-up question. With that being said, I return to the question I posed in my last post.

Where else is this pillaging taking place?
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

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Oddly, I never pushed reply. It just posted.


Regardless of our disagreement on the usage of the word pillage, I do comprehend your usage of the word. Hence, I used it in my follow-up question. With that being said, I return to the question I posed in my last post.

Where else is this pillaging taking place?


Thanks for explaining the double ... At this point your disagreement is with Webster, not me.

Also,


Where else is this pillaging taking place?

That question is off topic from the Thread's title:

Kenya signs infrastructure, energy deals worth $5 bln with China



And therefore, I am precluded from answering it here, is that okay?

...
 
Last edited:
Aug 30, 2013
11
1
Thanks for explaining the double ... At this point your disagreement is with Webster, not me.

Also,

Where else is this pillaging taking place?

That question is off topic from the Thread's title:

Kenya signs infrastructure, energy deals worth $5 bln with China



And therefore, I am precluded from answering it here, is that okay?
Rather you answer or not is your choice, of course. But I have to wonder why you replied at all with the Sierra Leone article if you didn't want to discuss the issue of the African continent supposedly being "raped". Black people like to throw around terms and regurgitate certain popular sentiments, but very seldom can they backup what they say.

As far as the word "pillage" is concerned; No one calls the police to report a pillaging. If you grew a garden and then your children picked some tomatoes and handed them to me without your consent you wouldn't say I pillaged your gardener. The word is not normally used outside the context of violence acts, regardless of what you think Webster says. Hence, the term "especially". You are taking a word with violent connotations to make something sound worse than it is.
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

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Rather you answer or not is your choice, of course. But I have to wonder why you replied at all with the Sierra Leone article if you didn't want to discuss the issue of the African continent supposedly being "raped". Black people like to throw around terms and regurgitate certain popular sentiments, but very seldom can they backup what they say.

As far as the word "pillage" is concerned; No one calls the police to report a pillaging. If you grew a garden and then your children picked some tomatoes and handed them to me without your consent you wouldn't say I pillaged your gardener. The word is not normally used outside the context of violence acts, regardless of what you think Webster says. Hence, the term "especially". You are taking a word with violent connotations to make something sound worse than it is.



The Rape of Africa by China


To feed the voracious appetite of its economic machine galloping at a dizzying 9 percent clip, China has been trolling for resources in Africa. It has spent billions of dollars securing drilling rights in Angola, Nigeria, Sudan and Angola; has exploration or extraction deals with Chad, Gabon, Mauritania, Kenya, the Republic of Congo, Equatorial Guinea and Ethiopia; and has invested in the copper industry in Zambia and Congo as well as buying timber in Gabon, Cameroon, Mozambique, Equatorial Guinea and Liberia. Across Africa, Chinese companies are muscling out Western and other foreign companies, winning contracts to pave highways, build hydroelectric dams, upgrade ports, lay railway tracks and build pipelines. All these forays have been sugar-coated with euphonious anti-colonial verbiage: That China was not a colonial power in Africa. But I dismiss this as "chopsticks mercantilism." With chopsticks dexterity, China can pick platinum from Zimbabwe; oil from Angola, Nigeria and Sudan; cocoa from Ghana; diamonds from Sierra Leone; etc. - all on its own terms.

China deals with just about any rogue and unsavory regime in Africa that has some natural resource to exploit. It supplies jet fighters, military vehicles and guns to Zimbabwe, Sudan, Ethiopia and other repressive governments. At the U.N., China has used its veto power to block sanctions against tyrannical regimes in Sudan and Zimbabwe. Four aspects of China's dealings in Africa are particularly obnoxious and objectionable. First, many of the deals are brokered by a Chinese outfit called the Queensway syndicate, of a shady corporate structure and a multiplicity of shell companies. Based in Hong Kong, it operates largely in secret and negotiates deals with African governments in barter terms that are stacked in China's favor. Oversight of the Queensway syndicate's operations is almost non-existent and it does not publish even routine data. Here are some examples of its deals:
http://www.africanpost.com/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=1148:the-rape-of-africa-by-china&catid=55:individual&Itemid=150


Africa Next 50 Years

Did you know that Tanzania gets only 4 per cent of the proceeds of its gold exports while 96 per cent goes to the foreign companies doing the production? Royalty rate paid by multinational companies for crude oil in Ghana is 5 per cent. While Saudi Arabia gets 85 per cent and Iraq 90 per cent!
A journalist once aptly wrote that gold exported from Tanzania was Tanzanian only to the extent it was extracted from Tanzanian soil. This same could be said of Ghana’s oil. And the foreign companies rarely pay corporate income tax, not when many countries offer investors decades of tax holiday. For example, Mali offers a 30-year tax holiday and receives only 5 per cent royalties for its gold exports.


This resource pillage in Africa is presently the world’s worst case of open economic theft.


While Africans get little from the exploitation of these subsoil resources, they are left to pick up the huge bill of its environment damage. We can refer to what Dutch/British-owned Shell is doing in Nigeria’s Niger Delta or what the French Areva is doing in Niger, where radioactive waste is causing a disaster for man and environment. The utter disregard for the humanity of Africans by Western firms leads one to conclude that the mentality of the exploiter of Africa has not changed a bit from the days of the trans-Atlantic slave trade.

http://www.theafricancourier.de/index.php?option=com_content&view=article&id=528:africa-next-50-years&catid=122:africa--50&Itemid=819
 

Clyde C Coger Jr

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In the Spirit of Sankofa,



... :facepalm: ...



As relations deepen, however, a wider rift is opening between Chinese and Congolese at the workplace. Congo's leaders laud Chinese investors for creating jobs. But some here note that large Chinese companies often employ Chinese workers to do jobs that could easily be done by Congolese. Even Congolese who do get hired by Chinese companies may find their high expectations dashed.
As Africa welcomes more Chinese factories, a new wariness sets in

In Congo, Chinese are settling in with businesses and bargains that locals love. But at a giant copper smelting plant, Chinese and locals work together but live apart.


Some 6,000 miles away from his home in China, Robin Wei awakes on a cot beneath a white mosquito net. He gets dressed, opens the door of his bunker, and walks out into the rainy season toward the factory where he works.

Wei is one of hundreds of thousands of Chinese men and women – as many as 1 million by some estimates – who, at least for now, call Africa home. (Wei goes home to visit his wife and daughter once a year.) China has been investing heavily in Africa for more than a decade, and both China and its migrants are in what could be called a settling-in period as the story of a fast-growing Africa and a rising China unfolds.

Some see China as merely the newest player in a centuries-old pattern of foreign powers coming to make their fortunes from Congo's natural resources.


http://news.yahoo.com/africa-welcomes-more-chinese-factories-wariness-sets-141000907.html
 

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