Black People : Japan's Nuclear disaster, verified to be as bad as Chernobyl

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Apr 12, 2011.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Japanese Commission: Nuclear Crisis as Bad as Chernobyl


    Osha Gray Davidson
    Forbes
    April 12, 2011

    The Japanese Nuclear Safety Commission (JNSC) has decided to raise the threat level posed by the crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi (FDI) nuclear power plant to equal the 1986 disaster at Chernobyl, according to the state-run television network, NHK.

    Previously, the commission held that the amount of radiation released from FDI warranted only a level 5 designation on the International Nuclear Event Scale (which runs from 1 to 7). The 1979 U.S. meltdown at Three Mile Island is also rated a five.

    http://www.infowars.com/japanese-commission-nuclear-crisis-as-bad-as-chernobyl/
     
  2. Chevron Dove

    Chevron Dove Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    How sad. I read somewhere that the affects of Chernobyl are still happening in some places even as far as France, after 25 years. I believe this atrocity is going to go on and on and have major affects in Japan, but also everywhere in regards to the world economy and how governments relate to each other.

    I just recently saw an older movie, called Cove, and how the Japanese people of an area had made mad business with people on the Black dominated islands, and how they were pressed to stop doing business with them so that the dolphins would not be killed and butchered. But then at the end it showed that Japan picked up many other business partners when one Black country did stop. So the problem is that when one country does something, it affects so many other countries. My thoughts are that the western powers and probaby China too, still are perhaps the powerhouse behind whose buying the dolphins anyway. They are apart of why all of the counties whether in the Carribeans or off the coast of Southeast Asia are able to be in business with the japanese. And now, I believe that those suffereing people in Japan will have to get a lot of help financially from the international powerhouses and it's what goes on behind the scenes that also causes a lot of other problems in this world, even when it comes to helping out humanity when there are natural catastrophes that happens. these governments are sometimes not on the up and up on how they give out money to help certain suffering people, and the crisis in Katrina just comes to my mind all the time.
     
  3. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It's been said that it could reach that level if it's not contained properly. It's barely hitting the 10% level ofChernobyl.

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article.cfm?id=tepco-wary-of-fukushima-radiation-l
     
  4. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    thanks for the link!

    TEPCO wary of Fukushima radiation leak exceeding Chernobyl.

    | April 11, 2011 | 11

    April 12 (Reuters) - The operator of Japan's crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant said on Tuesday that they are concerned that the radiation leakage could eventually exceed that of the 1986 Chernobyl nuclear disaster.

    "The radiation leak has not stopped completely and our concern is that it could eventually exceed Chernobyl," an official from operator Tokyo Electric and Power told reporters on Tuesday.

    Japan on Tuesday raised the severity of its nuclear crisis at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear plant to a level 7 from 5, putting it on par with the Chernobyl nuclear disaster in 1986.

    My apologies for not highlighting the fact that the article was originaly from Forbes, not infowars.
    but what article says barely?

    barely 10 percent of the worst nuclear disater in history

    is like a single brother asking a sister he is interestedd in ,
    at a club,
    if she is married and she says barely



    Japan upgrades nuclear crisis to same level as Chernobyl

    Nuclear and industrial safety agency raises severity rating to maximum on international nuclear and radiological event scale

    Justin McCurry in Tokyo guardian.co.uk, Tuesday 12 April 2011

    Japan has raised the severity of its nuclear crisis to level seven, putting it on a par with the Chernobyl disaster Link to this video Japan has raised the severity level of its nuclear crisis to the maximum seven, putting the emergency at the Fukushima Daiichi power plant on a par with Chernobyl.

    Officials from the nuclear and industrial safety agency (Nisa) confirmed that the crisis level had been raised from five to seven on the international nuclear and radiological event scale.

    But they said the new rating reflects the initial impact of the nuclear crisis, adding that radiation levels have since dropped dramatically.

    The scale, devised by the International Atomic Energy Agency, ranks nuclear and radiological accidents and incidents by severity from one to seven.

    Level seven incidents involve a major release of radiation with widespread health and environmental effects, according to the IAEA.

    In recent days Japanese officials had suggested there was no need to raise the severity level from five, which had been applied to the Three Mile Island accident in 1979.

    A spokesman for Nisa said the decision to raise the level to the status of a major accident did not mean that the Japanese plant posed the same threat to public health or involved similarly big releases of radiation as the 1986 Chernobyl disaster.

    "At Chernobyl, the reactor itself exploded while still active, which is completely different from the situation at Fukushima," Hidehiko Nishiyama said.

    He added that the decision had been taken a month after the accident because experts needed time to analyse the data.

    Japan's nuclear safety commission estimated that the Fukushima plant's reactors had released up to 10,000 terabecquerels of radioactive iodine-131 per hour into the air for several hours after they were damaged in the 11 March earthquake and tsunami.

    The emission of radioactive substances from Fukushima Daiichi was about 10% of that detected at Chernobyl, Nishiyama said.


    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2011/apr/12/japan-nuclear-crisis-chernobyl-severity-level1
     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    There is also the question of government coverup of how devestating situations are

    Did the US coverup exactly how bad 3 Mile Island was, during the initial reports,
    did Russia coverup, during the time of Chernobyl,
    and is the Japanese government covering up now?


    from Democracy Now:
    AMY GOODMAN: So, talk about this raising of the category level to 7, on a par with Chernobyl.

    DR. MICHIO KAKU: Well, Tokyo Electric has been in denial, trying to downplay the full impact of this nuclear accident. However, there’s a formula, a mathematical formula, by which you can determine what level this accident is. This accident has already released something on the order of 50,000 trillion becquerels of radiation. You do the math.
    That puts it right smack in the middle of a level 7 nuclear accident. Still, less than Chernobyl. However, radiation is continuing to leak out of the reactors.
    The situation is not stable at all. So, you’re looking at basically a ticking time bomb. It appears stable, but the slightest disturbance—a secondary earthquake, a pipe break, evacuation of the crew at Fukushima—could set off a full-scale meltdown at three nuclear power stations, far beyond what we saw at Chernobyl.

    AMY GOODMAN: Talk about exactly—I mean, as a physicist, to explain to people—exactly what has taken place in Japan at these nuclear power plants.

    DR. MICHIO KAKU: Think of driving a car, and the car all of a sudden lunges out of control. You hit the brakes. The brakes don’t work. That’s because the earthquake wiped out the safety systems in the first minute of the earthquake and tsunami.
    Then your radiator starts to heat up and explodes. That’s the hydrogen gas explosion. And then, to make it worse, the gas tank is heating up, and all of a sudden your whole car is going to be in flames. That’s the full-scale meltdown.

    So what do you do? You drive the car into a river. That’s what the utility did by putting seawater, seawater from the Pacific Ocean, in a desperate attempt to keep water on top of the core. But then, seawater has salt in it, and that gums up your radiator.
    And so, what do you do? You call out the local firemen. And so, now you have these Japanese samurai warriors. They know that this is potentially a suicide mission. They’re coming in with hose water—hose water—trying to keep water over the melted nuclear reactor cores.
    So that’s the situation now. So, when the utility says that things are stable, it’s only stable in the sense that you’re dangling from a cliff hanging by your fingernails. And as the time goes by, each fingernail starts to crack. That’s the situation now.


    http://www.democracynow.org/2011/4/13/expert_despite_japanese_govt_claims_of
     
  6. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    These are two good sources as well that explain that the rating change seems to be a mix of retroactive observation and long-term projections. The situation isn't getting worse.


    Q&A from NPR:
    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/story.php?storyId=135347791

    Comparison by the BBC:
    http://www.bbc.co.uk/news/world-asia-pacific-13050228

    I don't see anything that indicates a cover-up. It would seem an underestimation is more likely as they pushed out whatever information they had to the public at the time while coordinating a response. TEPCO should definitely answer for all its lapses in safety though.
     
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