Black People : J Edgar Hoover and the war on the Afrocentric Movement

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Jul 29, 2011.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The second thing taken from us after our freedom, was our culture. Now this was a scientific imperative to promote mental slavery,
    because it is ones culture that creates the instinctive motivation towards collective reciprocity on every level of human life.
    Dr Clarke relates in the documentary "A Great and Mighty Walk" that the institutions, that evidenced mass social pathologies did not exist,
    in Africa 500 years ago.
    He staes that there were no prisons, becuase the culture, lead one to alyruism rathe then avarice,
    and there were no orphanages, because the village really did raise a child, whose parents may have passed on.
    Mariage, loving mariage, was an institution, tha was universal.
    Educational excellence among the youth from 5 to 16, had a peer pressure towards excellence and achievement according to the slave naratives, and a socialisic type of economy of reciprocit existed, yet allowing aspecs of free trade.
    The Afrocentic movement had burst and starts, like those who had escaped to te Gulah islands in the Carolina and the North Ameican Maroons, in Loisiana.
    Richard Alen established some vestiges of it with the African Methodist Zion churches and philanthropies, and later, with Garvey's thust towards Pan Africanism, and the imperative of studying African history and culture.
    Malcolm after leaving the NOI, said the most important aspect of the NOI was it's emphais on things African, something I recall vividly as a small child seeing Olatunji and Mariam Makeba perform at a NOI presentation.
    The liberation struggle victories in the Motherland were shared with us here, via the visitation of numeous dignitaries, scholrs, and artists,
    who in the 60s came to Harlem and Breoklyn,making presentaions for family viewing and edification.
    The New Breed created the IN THING in clothing with their dashikis, gaelahs andbubahs, that sisters and brothes wore to church, school, work, and the style was also promoted by the Soul, Motown, Wat Saxx, singes and movie actors of the time,

    so literaly millions were being lost by white industry via our dolars doing a 360 within the community, and this gotthe atytention of COINTELPRO

    music, the music of The Last Poets, Pharoah Sanders, Sun Ra, Alice Coltrane, Archie Shepp, Nina Simone, promoted the movement also Abie Lincon and her husband Max Roach

    Ed Bulins, Barbara Ann Ter, and Amiri Baracka, use te teater to promote te movement,

    but what realy scared the hell out of white supremacy was the
    Nguzo Saba, and the creation of Kwanzaa, something that would notonly put a dent ptentialy in the shoping peid most imprtant to any pseudo capitalist society
    Christmas shoping, but also instil very real principles that would remove Black folks from, mental, economic and political slavery Umoja (Unity)
    To strive for and maintain unity in the family, community, nation and race.

    [​IMG]Kujichagulia (Self-Determination)
    To define ourselves, name ourselves, create for ourselves and speak for ourselves.

    [​IMG]Ujima (Collective Work and Responsibility)
    To build and maintain our community together and make our brother's and sister's problems our problems and to solve them together.

    [​IMG]Ujamaa (Cooperative Economics)
    To build and maintain our own stores, shops and other businesses and to profit from them together.

    [​IMG]Nia (Purpose)
    To make our collective vocation the building and developing of our community in order to restore our people to their traditional greatness.

    [​IMG]Kuumba (Creativity)
    To do always as much as we can, in the way we can, in order to leave our community more beautiful and beneficial than we inherited it.

    [​IMG]Imani (Faith)
    To believe with all our heart in our people, our parents, our teachers, our leaders and the righteousness and victory of our struggle.
    http://baykwanzaa.blogspot.com/2009/12/nguzo-saba-seven-principles.html
     
  2. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  4. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    FBI agent confesses about destroying a African cultural theater.

    The Afrocentric Movement spread the way Hip hop does today, and the oligarchy was terrified at the way Black folks regardless of religion, economic status or region were picking up on it,
    and they knew what would happen to people of African descent if they were able to retain the core factors of African culture,
    and what that would do yo our economic and political perpective
     
  5. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Afrocentricity

    By Dr. Molefi Kete Asante
    Published 4/13/2009
    Afrocentricity is a paradigm based on the idea that African people should re-assert a sense of agency in order to achieve sanity. During the l960s a group of African American intellectuals in the newly-formed Black Studies departments at universities began to formulate novel ways of analyzing information. In some cases, these new ways were called looking at information from “a black perspective” as opposed to what had been considered the “white perspective” of most information in the American academy.

    In the late l970s Molefi Kete Asante began speaking of the need for an Afrocentric orientation to data. By l980 he had published a book, Afrocentricity: The Theory of Social Change, which launched the first full discussion of the concept. Although the word existed before Asante’s book and had been used by many people, including Asante in the l970s, and Kwame Nkrumah in the l960s, the intellectual idea did not have substance as a philosophical concept until l980.

    The Afrocentric paradigm is a revolutionary shift in thinking proposed as a constructural adjustment to black disorientation, decenteredness, and lack of agency. The Afrocentrist asks the question, “What would African people do if there were no white people?” In other words, what natural responses would occur in the relationships, attitudes toward the environment, kinship patterns, preferences for colors, type of religion, and historical referent points for African people if there had not been any intervention of colonialism or enslavement? Afrocentricity answers this question by asserting the central role of the African subject within the context of African history, thereby removing Europe from the center of the African reality. In this way, Afrocentricity becomes a revolutionary idea because it studies ideas, concepts, events, personalities, and political and economic processes from a standpoint of black people as subjects and not as objects, basing all knowledge on the authentic interrogation of location.

    So that it becomes legitmate to ask, “Where is the sistah coming from?” or “Where is the brotha at?” “Are you down with overcoming oppression?” These are assessment and evaluative questions that allow the interrogator to accurately pinpoint the responder’s location, whether it be a cultural or psychological location. As a paradigm Afrocentricity enthrones the centrality of the African, that is, black ideals and values, as expressed in the highest forms of African culture, and activates consciousness as a functional aspect of any revolutionary approach to phenomena. The cognitive and structural aspects of a paradigm are incomplete without the functional aspect. There is something more than knowing in the Afrocentric sense; there is also doing. Afrocentricity holds that all definitions are autobiographical.

    One of the key assumptions of the Afrocentrist is that all relationships are based on centers and margins and the distances from either the center or the margin. When black people view themselves as centered and central in their own history then they see themselves as agents, actors, and participants rather than as marginals on the periphery of political or economic experience. Using this paradigm, human beings have discovered that all phenomena are expressed in the fundamental categories of space and time. Furthermore, it is then understood that relationships develop and knowledge increases to the extent we are able to appreciate the issues of space and time.

    The Afrocentric scholar or practitioner knows that one way to express Afrocentricity is called marking. Whenever a person delineates a cultural boundary around a particular cultural space in human time, this is called marking. It might be done with the announcement of a certain symbol, the creation of a special bonding, or the citing of personal heroes of African history and culture. Beyond citing the revolutionary thinkers in our history, that is, beyond Amilcar Cabral, Frantz Fanon, Malcolm X and Nkrumah, we must be prepared to act upon our interpretation of what is in the best interest of black people, that is, black people as an historically oppressed population. This is the fundamental necessity for advancing the political process.
    http://www.asante.net/articles/1/afrocentricity/
     
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