Black People Politics : Israel Courts African-American Evangelicals, Despite Some Hurdles

Discussion in 'Black People Politics' started by Liberty, Sep 22, 2015.

  1. Liberty

    Liberty going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    September 22, 2015 5:11 AM ET

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    African-American evangelical leaders visited a Jerusalem crafts workshop for elderly Israelis, a project supported by the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews. The group and Israel's tourism ministry sponsored the pastors' trip to Israel, part of the Fellowship's new outreach effort to African-American congregations. Courtesy of IFCJ hide caption itoggle caption Courtesy of IFCJ

    Bishop Edwin Bass first set foot in the Holy Land last month, though he'd sung songs and preached stories of Zion much of his life. Head of the
    Church of God in Christ's Urban Initiatives program, which assists the Church's 12,000 congregations across the U.S. combat social problems, he called his week-long sojourn one of the most moving experiences of his life.

    "Just to have come and walked in the city of Jerusalem, to put the pieces together and understand the history of it, it's been a great experience."

    Bass was part of a 20-member delegation representing the 6.5 million-member Pentecostal church. The visit was paid for by the
    International Fellowship of Christians and Jews, a charity supporting dozens of social projects in Israel and the Jewish diaspora, as well as Israel's tourism ministry. It was part of a new outreach effort to African-American churches by the interfaith group, which has offices in Jerusalem, Chicago, Toronto and Seoul.

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    Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein, founder of the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews, welcomes Church of God in Christ leaders to a migrant assistance center in Tel Aviv. Emily Harris/NPR hide caption

    itoggle caption Emily Harris/NPR
    Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein, founder of the International Fellowship of Christians and Jews, welcomes Church of God in Christ leaders to a migrant assistance center in Tel Aviv.

    Emily Harris/NPR
    Fellowship founder Rabbi Yechiel Eckstein welcomed the visitors to a center in Tel Aviv that assists migrants seeking asylum in Israel, mostly from Sudan and Eritrea.

    "Shalom," he said, using the Hebrew greeting of peace, then joked, "Are you all new immigrants here?"

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    ETA: I can't post the link to this story. And, I cant delete the post/
     
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