Black Spirituality Religion : Islam In Black America...

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Aqil, May 1, 2003.

  1. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Islam in Black America: A Conversation with Robert Dannin

    Robert Dannin's Black Pilgrimage to Islam, published earlier this year, blends words and photographs to present a fascinating and nuanced picture of the world of African-American Muslims and their encounter with the Arab-Islamic world.

    In his introduction, the author, a professor of Metropolitan Studies at New York University, asks: "Why would African-Americans fashion themselves into a double minority?" It's an especially important question these days, when Islamic identity has become as dangerous as Black identity has always been in this country. Dannin sets out to answer his question by tracing the history of Islam in Black America from the narratives of Muslim slaves to the Moorish Science Temple, the Ahmadiyya movement, the Nation of Islam and W.D. Muhammed's Muslim American Community, today the largest community of Muslims in America.

    You can read the entire interview here:

    http://www.afrocentriconline.com/phpBB2/viewtopic.php?t=5597
     
  2. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    From the article:

    "Many writers on jazz today just don't talk about this. Scott Devoe wrote a whole book called The Birth of Bebop and doesn't once mention Islam as any kind of an influence, and this is a serious issue. There has been a blindspot in talking about the history of Islam in America. The media caricature of fundamentalist Islam that's always on the front pages these days is not an accurate description of Islam in America. But what we see from the early 20th century is a real genuine Islamic counter-culture — from the earliest days in 20th century-Greenwich Village to the 1960s and early 1970s..."

    There are many prominent jazz musicians who are Muslim. Flautist Yusef Latif, keyboardists Ahmad Jamal and Suleiman Saud (formerly McCoy Tyner), percussionists ldris Muhammad and Rashid Ali, and jazz vocalist Aliyah Rabia (formerly Dakota Staton)...and as the article notes, Dizzy Gillespie almost took shahada...
     
  3. N.A.T.

    N.A.T. Member MEMBER

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    I dont understand how that is, its a bit of a contradiction to me, in Islam you are not suppose to listen to music. Well that which is provided by instrumentals. I.e. guitars, pianos, etc.
     
  4. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What is the source of your information?
     
  5. Matchbook Lady

    Matchbook Lady Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Peace,

    Aqil, thank you for this...VERY enlightening...may I use it on a different forum..of course I'll give you credit...


    Peace
     
  6. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Of course, Matchbook Lady...anytime. However, I can't take credit because I'm not the author...
     
  7. ifasehun

    ifasehun Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    lmao. Aqil.

    [1] i have read it before and referenced it on my own web site when i wrote a two part series on Islam: Trading One Master for Another. So I am familiar with the piece.

    [2] uh..where da' note from the author to reprint in its entirety? lmao (half way joking. Destee been on me for all of my 3 days of membership about that stuff..lol)

    direct responses below:

    * most people approached Islam for the same reason I did: disatisification with european/western values and culture. as well as a resentment of the idea that we were worshipping the God of our captor. of course that would imply that Islam is suitable because it is: (1)from us or (2)not from our captor. In both instances this is incorrect. I had the priveledge of befriending a family close to the H. Elijah Muhammad while in high school. What I found interesting is that a teen being groomed for leadership in the NOI told me that in the early days, and even up to Farrakhan in the ealy 80s - the NOI implied that Arabic was an african language and that Islam was an African religion, citing the large muslim population in Africa as evidence.

    Of course the H. Elijah M. had already made it clear what he thought of African religion. Straight from the mouth of one of the highest ranking NOI officials I have ever known, I hear this: "African religion is barbarism and is a way to which we should not return."

    Now wait a sec. lol So Islam is African but it can be somehow differiented from other indigenous religions? How so? And why does it not bare the mark of a savage too? Hmm. Upon close inspection we find commonalities among all African religions. Even the traditional beliefs of the ever warring Hausa and Yoruba bear resemblance. And they in turn together bear resemblance to S. Africa and Kenyan systems. and then Congo to Togo and Togo to Zambia. So why is Islam not bearing resemblance if its African? And more importantly, if its African why do all historical accounts by africans call it a foreign religion that was introduced to Africa?

    If we bounce to the present, we can't deny the good that the NOI has done for black people. It practically invented prison ministry - then it perfected it. But it doesnt change that the two major reasons for practicing it in the first place were never addressed: it IS the religion of a foreigner, so its no different than being a christian. it Is the religion of a captor, Arabs did and continue to trade in Africans as labor, sex toys and mercenaries illegally. muslims are the only people on earth to trade africans continously without a pause for the past 400 years. they have waged cultural Jihad against Africa since Egypt stood. So we are as the article I referanced - trading one Master for another.

    *I say that there is nothing positive that is obtained by practicing a foreign religion - even Islam that can not be gotten by practicing a religion that comes from your own loins. there are no social, political or artistic benefits to arabic culture that can not be found in africa culture.

    *While I know where I am from in Africa, down to the exact community (tribe) its not necessary for all of us to have that knowledge. we know that over 85% of us are from W. Africa. Pick a country that is not completely run over by arabic or white thought and learn. (I have already posted a list of several african religions practiced successfully and to great benefit in the U.S.) Anything is better than practicing the religion of someone that is related to the murderer or enslaver of your Ancestors. Any african religion will do if the only other option is "their" religion.

    If not for spiritual reasons, then for psychological health, political alligience, social change - or try this one on for size: Justice.

    *On the issue of women, we find one of the most IMPORTANT REASONS for practicing african spirituality. Most clergy are women in indigenous systems. They also control finances in traditional settings. They are entrepreneurs and religious leaders for God's sake! This is our sister's DIVINE BIRTHRIGHT! They shouldn't be shackled by arabic or european etiquette. In homes where African spirituality is practiced, women are partners, sometimes the boss. lol Gender specific roles exist, but there is room for men and women to lead and support. Even polygamy in an truly afrocentric setting benefits the woman much more. (a wife must agree and in some cases initiate it before it can take place.)


    okay..i wrote enough. lol i will come back when others have had a chance to comment.


    p.s. yes. from time to time, i like to write in different colors. lol
    [/color]
     
  8. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I first read the piece on The Black Electorate. I called the NYT re: permission to reprint and they told me that Mr. Aidi would e-mail me re: this. I never heard from him...

    Are you implying that most of the 1.6 billion Muslims in the world approached Islam for the same reason you did? And the rest of your statement is ludicrous.

    In both instances you are incorrect in the insignificant personal opinions that you have proffered...

    Islam is universal..worshiped by 1.6 billion people all over the world...in practically every country in the world...

    What Elijah Muhammad said or did not say is irrelevant...

    What is your point? Who do you claim said Islam was an African religion? And what difference does it make?

    What is the source of your information? There is nothing in the world like the Muslim's undying love for his/her religion...

    I disagree...I say practicing the religion of your choice is positive. And Islam is not considered a foreign religion...just as Christianity is not considered a foreign religion. Ifa is considered a foreign religion...

    You must be talking about Christianity, the religion of the white man...

    Who said they are?

    Is this what Ifa promotes? In fact, let me suggest something to you. You would make much more headway in this forum if you posted threads and posts that define the tenets of the Ifa religion, instead of surreptitiously attempting to plant a seed in the minds of readers here that Islam is the religion of Arab slaveholders...

    In other words, talk about what YOU believe in, instead of your biased opinions of why others believe as they do...
     
  9. Destee

    Destee destee.com STAFF

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    My Dearest Aqil, Ifasehun is right. I have been on him and everyone regarding adding content that belongs to others, without first obtaining and including permission for it to be here. If it was requested and not obtained, then we don't have permission and the content should not be here.

    You know i love you Aqil, but if we don't have permission for it to be here, it needs to be removed, please.

    Thank You.

    :heart:

    Destee
     
  10. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My badd...no problem Destee.


    :heart:
     
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