Black Spirituality Religion : Islam and Astrology: A Historical Perspective...

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by Aqil, Jul 21, 2003.

  1. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Islam and Astrology: A Historical Perspective

    Although the first tribes to inhabit the Arabian Peninsula practiced various types of magic, it appears that the ancient royal art of astrology was unknown to them. It was the Chaldean priests and merchants who introduced astrology to these regions. Later, Arab astrologers adopted the Egyptian astrology of the famous Greek astronomer and astrologer Claudius Ptolemy (100-178 AD) who lived in Alexandria, Egypt, and continued to practice it after Prophet Muhammad (saw) died, since its underlying neoplatonism did not seem contradictory to the teachings of the Holy Qur’an. They soon became proficient, and it was through the two great expansions of the religion of Islam (632-732 and 1326-1687 AD) that the astrology of the ancients was carried into Spain through North Africa, and into the Balkans via Turkey.

    The Arabs saw astrology as part of a larger whole – not merely as a tool for practicing events, but as a key for understanding life by contemplating the marriage of Heaven and Earth, for everything in one had its counterpart in the other. Each planet was seen as a spiritual channel, and had a symbolic role that incorporated elements of the Bible and the Qur’an. For example, Saturn was associated with Ibrahim (Abraham); Jupiter with Musa (Moses); Mars with Harun (Aaron); Venus with Yusef (Joseph); and Mercury with Isa (Jesus).

    Much of the survival of classical science and philosophy is owed to the fact that it was preserved and used by the advanced Arab cultures of northern Africa and the eastern Mediterranean from about the 8th century BC. In the fields of medicine and astronomy in particular, Arabs showed themselves to be outstandingly skillful. Centers of learning were established in Baghdad, Iraq and Damascus, Syria, and Caliph Al-Munsur ibn Harun Al-Rashid of Baghdad established a major observatory and library in the city, making Baghdad the world's first astronomical capital.

    Arab astronomical studies, moreover, had a strong astrological orientation. They defined a new (if dubious) form of practical astrology that could be used for all manner of divination in everyday life, such as the discovery of the most propitious times for the undertaking of journeys, marriages, etc. Nevertheless, their emphasis on “favorable” or “unfavorable” indications – rather than on prophesying categorical events – was later to be a great help to astrology as it rehabilitated itself in the West during the Renaissance.

    Albumasur (the Latinized name of Abu Mashar Ja’far ibn Muhammad, 805-886 AD) was the greatest of all Arab astrologers. His treatise, Introductorium in Astronomiam, showed a positive Aristotelian influence. “As the motions of these wandering planets are never interrupted,” he wrote, “so the generations and alterations of earthly things never have an end. Only by observing the great diversity of planetary motions can we comprehend the numbered varieties of change in this world.”

    He and many other Muslim astrologers oftentimes referred to the planets as “the Ambassadors of Allah.” In addition, Albumasur’s Introductorium was one of the first books to find its way in translation through Spain and into Europe during the Middle Ages. It was to prove highly influential in the revival of astrology and astronomy.

    In the golden age of Islam (9th, 10th and 11th centuries) there were great advances in astrology and astronomy, and it was during this period in history that astronomy was only considered as a means of astrological measurement. The Arabs invented the astrolabe, possibly as an aid for determine the direction of Mecca, Islam’s holiest city, for noontime prayers. The following are the names of a few of the great Arab astrologers and some of their achievements:

    The aforementioned Albumasur also originated the theory of cycles, and is said to have predicted the French Revolution...

    Thabit ibn Qarra (d. 901 AD) wrote a treatise on the art of making astrological talismans and amulets...

    Albohali (the Latinized name of Abu Ali Yakub ibn al-Kair) specialized in genethliacal astrology...

    Rhazes (the Latinized name of Al-Razi, the late 10th century), later known as the “Paracelsus of the Arabs,” practiced an early form of medical astrology...

    Albohazen Haly (the Latinized name of Abu Hassan Ali ibn Abu Ridschal, 11th century), known in the West as “Summus Astrologicus” (the greatest astrologer), wrote a treatise in eight volumes that may be regarded as a compendium of the astrological knowledge of Islam...

    Al-Biruni (Abu al-Rahan Muhammad ibn Ahmad al-Biruni, 973-1048 AD) wrote The Elements of Astrology, which was the standard astrological text for centuries. To him modern astrology owes such concepts as the Moon representing the feminine principle and the collective memory.

    Arab astrology is unique in the way it combines the interpretation of a horoscope with divinatory practices such as geomancy and the Tarot, and in the importance it accords to pentacles and talismans. Like the Hindus and Chinese, the Arabs conceived 28 lunar mansions (corresponding to the 28 letters of the Arabic alphabet) which they called “manzils.” Each manzil represented one day in the cycle of the Moon, and was associated with both a meteorological and a magical influence. For example, the manzil beginning with the star Aldebaran was auspicious for marriage or travel when transited by the Moon. It was also associated with dry weather, and was used in magical incantations to wreak revenge and promulgate ill will.

    It has been historically contended that the zodiac was merely an invention of the ancient Chaldean and Egyptian priest-astrologers. Yet, when there exists around the celestial equator of the solar system a belt of twelve constellations, who can be said to have invented this zodiac belt but Allah (swt), The Creator of the Universe and Supreme Inventor of All Things Therein? The ancient Ethiopian, Chaldean and Egyptian priest-astrologers had only to observe the Heavens to discover it. Actually it is to the credit of these ancient African Wise Men – who observed and depicted the zodiac before the coming of written history (circa 3200 BC) – that all knowledge evolved...
     
  2. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    "My companions are stars; whomsoever any one of you follow, you will be rightly guided."

    Prophet Muhammad (saw)

    (Sunan of Baihaqi)
     
  3. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Diodorus a greek Historian claim the Chaldeans and Babylonians learned Astronomy/astrology from Egyptian priest.

    Jesus is also associated with Jupiter and Venus.
     
  4. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    According to Islamic astrologers, the planet Mercury was associated with Prophet Isa (saw)...because Mercury rules Virgo, the sign he was born under...
     
  5. AACOOLDRE

    AACOOLDRE Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Then why Jesus calls himself the morning star (Venus) and his bride the evening star (church).

    The Koran did say "It is we who set out the Zodiacal signs in the heavens" Surah 15:16 God gives us many things that we must find and discover for ourselves. The Egyptians found it and taught others.
     
  6. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The planet Venus was called “Vesper” by the early astrologers, meaning “evening” in Latin. Thus Venus was called "Vesper" when an evening star, shining brilliantly in the Heavens during and after sunset...

    When Venus is the morning star, rising brilliantly before sunrise, it was called “Lucifer,” which is Latin for “light-bearing.”

    (The Greek words are “Hesperus,” meaning “evening,” and “Phosphorus,” meaning “that which brings the light.”)

    In Arabic astology each planet was seen as a spiritual channel, and had a symbolic role that incorporated elements of the Bible and the Qur’an. For example, Saturn was associated with Ibrahim (Abraham); Jupiter with Musa (Moses); Mars with Harun (Aaron); Venus with Yusef (Joseph); and Mercury with Isa (Jesus)...
     
  7. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It has been historically contended that the zodiac was merely an invention of the ancient Chaldean and Egyptian priest-astrologers. Yet, when there exists around the celestial equator of the solar system a belt of twelve constellations, who can be said to have invented this zodiac belt but Allah (swt), The Creator of the Universe and Supreme Inventor of All Things Therein? The ancient Ethiopian, Chaldean and Egyptian priest-astrologers had only to observe the Heavens to discover it...Actually it is to the credit of these ancient African Wise Men – who observed and depicted the zodiac before the coming of written history (circa 3200 BC) – that all knowledge evolved...
     
  8. Pharaoh Jahil

    Pharaoh Jahil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Peace....




    This is nothing but pure truth, I always knew that astrology played an important part in Islam. (Star and Cresent)
     
  9. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Naam Pharaoh Jahil...el haqq. As Prophet Muhammad (saw) said:

    "My companions are stars; whomsoever any one of you follow, you will be rightly guided."

    (Sunan of Baihaqi)
     
  10. Aqil

    Aqil Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    As-Salaamu-Alaikum, Pharaoh Jahil. Here is more re: astrology from Qur'an:

    “And indeed We have adorned the nearest heaven with lamps.”
    (Sura 67:5)

    “And landmarks (sign posts during the day) and by the stars (during the night), they (mankind) guide themselves.”
    (Sura 16:16)

    "...and We have made such lamps as missiles to drive away the Shaitan (devils).”
    (Sura 67:5)

    "Say (O Muhammad): Behold what is in the heaven and the earth! But revelations and warnings avail not folk who will not perceive."
    (Sura 10:101)

    "He detaileth the revelations for people who have knowledge."
    (Sura 10:5)

    Ma Salaam.
     
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