Black People : Isanusi

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Blackbird, Jan 5, 2010.

  1. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Since my latest return to Destee, albeit that it will be a brief stay, I noticed alot more passion and fire in the threads these days. People are genuinely involved, it appears, and really jogging their minds to come up with things that will help or move us forward.

    As I think on this, I'm remind of one of my favorite works - Ayi Kwei Armah's Two Thousand Seasons. It took me two years to actually read the book from when I first purchased it. I heard good stuff which is what prompted me to get it, plus I am a big fan of Marimba Ani and in her work 'Yurugu', she quoted a few passages from the work. Needless to say, after reading Two Thousands, I went on and read it three more times in quick succession. It went on to become one of my favorite books - along with Marimba Ani's Yurugu, most of Amos Wilson's books, the To Heal a People anthology and Malidoma Some's Of Water and the Spirit.

    One of my friends, back when I had much vigor and was a fairly profilic writer of Black culture, history, consciousness and nationbuilding, called me a "son of Isanusi". Before reading the book, those words had no real meaning or true value to me. But afterwards, I was very appreciative. I've said all of this to say, for those who have read Armah's book, continue to embody the spirit of Isanusi and for those who haven't read the book, I implore you to do so and become a part of that body of Isanusi.

    As we ascend to the 6th grove, underneath the karite tree, and whistlings of Damballah ring in our minds to return our collective Sie to the body for remember-ment and healing, may we never forget the drive we harness to do so was sparked by those first people that walked through the Door to never see home again. We may bicker and argue on how and why, but may we never disagree that something must be done.

    Tuhwi (A child of African and Indian heritage but with the blood of the Kongo in my veins strong as ever and the spirit of the Ghedevi always present)
     
  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Sho nuff! :toast: