Black Education / Schools : Is the more "Educated" African the worser African?

Discussion in 'Black Education / Schools' started by Asomfwaa, Nov 13, 2012.

  1. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    3,399
    Likes Received:
    2,558
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +2,564
    Another post reminded me to return to "The Mis-Education of the Negro." In Chapter X is this paragraph:

    "Here we find that the Negro has failed to recover from his slavish habit of berating his own and worshipping others as perfect beings. No progress has been made in this respect because the more "education" the Negro gets the worse off he is. He has just had so much longer to learn to decry and despise himself. The race looking to this educated class for a solution of its problems does not find any remedy; and, on the contrary, sees itself further and further away from those things to which it has aspired. By forgetting the schoolroom for the time being and relying upon an awakening of the masses through adult education we can do much to give the Negro a new point of view with respect to economic enterprise and group cooperation. The average Negro has not been sufficiently mis-educated to become hopeless."​

    I do not see anything wrong with it, as long as one keeps in mind that "Educated" here relates to "Eurocentric Education" or "Mis-Education." It's a pretty well-communicated idea. Though if anyone cares to explain it to the skeptical, be my guest.
     
  2. skuderjaymes

    skuderjaymes Contextualizer Synthesizer MEMBER

    Country:
    Japan
    Joined:
    Nov 2, 2009
    Messages:
    8,757
    Likes Received:
    5,870
    Occupation:
    independent thoughtist thinker, context linker
    Location:
    theory to application to discussion to percussion
    Ratings:
    +6,043
    what?
     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
  4. SlickBeast

    SlickBeast Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    Australia
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    631
    Likes Received:
    359
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Programmer/Game developer
    Location:
    Down Under
    Ratings:
    +361
    It is not those who are educated using Western models that is the problem. It is the pseudo-intellectuals, like the one in your posts, who are killing the black race (you can sense his anger and his hatred for the black race by reading in between the lines as well). Their naivety and romanticism have no practical use in the real world. And usually those blacks who claim to be educated are educated in such fields as African-American history, sociology and such fields that have little usefulness in the real world. African history is important but it is field that should be academically pursued by the already wealthy and casually or leisurely studied by all black people (I've achieved significant knowledge in that field by studying it leisurely myself). Else I wouldn't be surprise to see a homeless man with phD in Dogon Civilization while a barely literate but skilful carpenter is living in a mansion.

    I reckon people like Malcom X had in the long run done more harm than good with his "field negro, house negro" speech. It might have been useful back then but it set us back by dividing us and subconsciously seeding the idea that education is a white thing.

    It is important to also acknowledge that the black race is not a homogenous entity and there is no such thing as the black way of thinking (a black way of thinking can only be achieved through propaganda). There are as many way of thinking as there are black people. This is not a weakness but a strength. We need first to love ourselves first before we start loving our race. The battle starts inside as an individual battle. If you hate yourself there is no way you'll love race.
     
  5. SlickBeast

    SlickBeast Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    Australia
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    631
    Likes Received:
    359
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Programmer/Game developer
    Location:
    Down Under
    Ratings:
    +361
    What about your own informed opinion? Can't mindlessly quote the bible here, can you? Constant appeal to authority is not always a good thing.
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 28, 2009
    Messages:
    19,252
    Likes Received:
    5,505
    Gender:
    Female
    Ratings:
    +5,560
    SURE, I can give you BOTH!

    Informed Opinion:

    In 1903, W.E.B. DuBois (1868-1963) wrote "THE SOULS OF BLACK FOLK" in which he explains "Double Consciousness" and how Blacks have no "TRUE Self-Consciousness (lack of African history and identity)" He further explains how these psychological and social constructs relate to how Blacks view themselves and other Blacks.

    In 1933, Carter G. Woodson (1875 -1950) published "The MISEDUCATION OF THE NEGRO" in which he also detailed how the "Negro" has been so conditioned and assimilated through "mis-education" (lack of African history/identity) to mimic/mirror the very same "hatred" from white society against himself and his own People.

    So, LONG before Dr. Amos Wilson (1941-1995) *and many others* "termed" or spoke/wrote about "SELF-HATE," ancestors like WOODSON and DuBOIS had already talked about this concept, even if they did not, literally/specifically, phrase it as such.

    In order for YOU to better understand these comparisons, I suggest you actually READ these books yourself.....I have.

    And, speaking of "SELF HATE," how does it relate to YOU and your comments to me here?...What does it say about YOU seeking to insult/mock/belittle my spiritual beliefs and "cast stones" at me?


    BIBLE:

    Psalm 35:
    [19] Let not them that are mine enemies wrongfully rejoice over me: neither let them wink with the eye that hate me without a cause

    [26] Let them be ashamed and brought to confusion together that rejoice at mine hurt: let them be clothed with shame and dishonour that magnify themselves against me.
     
  7. SlickBeast

    SlickBeast Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    Australia
    Joined:
    Sep 2, 2011
    Messages:
    631
    Likes Received:
    359
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Programmer/Game developer
    Location:
    Down Under
    Ratings:
    +361
    All I want is your opinion! Your interpretation of the issue, not Dubois' per se. Your perception of the world as well as the members of this forum is more interesting to me. Have you ever analyzed and criticized Dubois' work or do you mindlessly agree with him? Vicious cycles repeat itself because people keep making the same mistake over and over again. If they hear something that connects immediately with them they'll mindlessly embrace it, yet they never take time to read with a critical eye and they ignore the flaws in his work.

    Anyone who is educated enough thirsts for knowledge and will naturally gravitate towards African history at one point or another else that person was never properly educated or "mis-educated" as Dubois put it. There are also black people who are not interested in history in general, but that's another matter. Black people are oblivious of black culture not because they have been "mis-educated" but because the lack of education altogether. It is as simple as that. From that perspective, Dubois is part of the problem not the solution.

    I'm also sick and tired of bible quoting drones who don't seem to be able to think for themselves and their invasion of all non-religious sub-forums. Your constant use of references or appeal to authority also mean you are not capable of independent thinking. You'll never lead, yet you'll be a good follower.
     
  8. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    3,399
    Likes Received:
    2,558
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +2,564
    I suppose I'm partially to blame for your misunderstanding, but Carter G. Woodson was the author of the above quotation. It's more a citation than an appeal to authority.

    Brother SlickBeast, I'm very shocked that you are unable to discern Sister cherryblossom's mindfulness. I do not dispute that some people will mindlessly make appeals, but clearly cherryblossom is well-read and has the intellect to summon relevant references at the blink of an eye.

    You may not realize it; but anyone who can summon relevant references can also summon irrelevant references. It's the ability to only command the relevant ones which makes the accusation of mindlessness not only rude and ridiculous, but 'mindless' in itself. Can't you see that?

    For instance, what cherryblossom shows is a superior talent at research skills. In research one forwards a consistent argument through researched citations. Observe how quickly she does this and you'll learn that she is an independent thinker with the added advantage of being well-read and organized.

    If anything, and with due respect, you're the one showcasing mindlessness insomuch as you accuse her of mindlessness in light of her mindfulness.

    What's more, I do not see how you can critique DuBois and Woodson from over half a century ago with modern scenarios. That's in itself, ironically, an appeal to an anachronistic authority.

    You critique Woodson, for instance, as Educated in African History when during his tenure there was no separate education for African History. In fact, Woodson, known as the "Father of Black History," was self-educated in the field and himself a promoter of self-education. And remember this writing is from 1933. You point to Malcolm X, who was born in 1925 as the progenitor of "Education as White" which is firstly a ridiculous notion, the wrong take-away from the analogy and a mindless appeal that's irrelevant to Carter G. Woodson.

    Finally, you dismiss the idea of a Black Way of Thinking and promote "Individualism." "Individualism"--as we experience it--is actually a Philosophical current from Modern Europe. Whereas you're not explicitly making an appeal to authority, you're making appeals to 'common sense' without making citations. As it were, that's mindless, mostly because it shows you're not really investigating the ideas that you're considering. It also shows that you're not as much an independent thinker as you think. It's ironic, yet understandable. As Carter G. Woodson taught in 1933:

    When you control a man's thinking you do not have to worry about his actions. You do not have to tell him not to stand here or go yonder. He will find his "proper place" and will stay in it. You do not need to send him to the back door. He will go without being told. In fact, if there is no back door, he will cut one for his special benefit. His education makes it necessary.​
     
  9. Asomfwaa

    Asomfwaa Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Nov 16, 2011
    Messages:
    3,399
    Likes Received:
    2,558
    Gender:
    Male
    Ratings:
    +2,564
    Thank you very much for this amount of information. You're so well-researched and charitable! :)

    Do you know which researcher termed "Self-Hate" in the African context?
     
  10. Omowale Jabali

    Omowale Jabali The Cosmic Journeyman PREMIUM MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Sep 29, 2005
    Messages:
    21,179
    Likes Received:
    9,463
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Creative Industrialist
    Location:
    Temple of Kali, Yubaland
    Ratings:
    +9,585
    Thanks for the mention of both DuBois and Carter. I will attempt to answer the question, keeping DuBois, a Harvard graduate in mind.

    The Double Consciousness is a self awareness of one identity and alienation in Americlan society. This consciousness Today, is similar to the consciousness of the post slavery, pre Civil Rights/Black power movement era.

    Therefore, the answer to this question is, yes, if this Education leads to further alienation and marginalization in Americlan society, and no if this Education leads to self knowledge, self determination and Black political and economic empowerment, minimizing the alienation and marginalization which is a result of uneven development under a capitalist system which suppressed our rights to social and economic justice.
     
Loading...