Black People : Is the End of Marijuana Prohibition the End of the War On Drugs? Probably Not.

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by RAPTOR, Jan 10, 2014.

  1. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    by BAR managing editor Bruce A. Dixon

    What if policymakers wanted to make marijuana safe for taxation and corporate
    profit, but needed to make sure legalization didn't produce new jobs and economic
    opportunities for poor and working class communities, or make them lay off any cops
    and judges, or have to close any prisons or jails? Well, the model in place in Colorado
    today would be a good start.

    "Ask yourself, what would it look like if policymakers wanted to end the prohibition of marijuana, but not necessarily the the war on drugs..."

    The forty years of so-called “war on drugs” has been the rhetorical excuse for a
    nationwide policy of punitive overpolicing in black and brown communities. Although
    black and white rates of drug use have been virtually identical, law enforcement
    strategies focused police resources almost exclusively upon communities of color.

    Prosecutors and judges did their bit as well, charging and convicting whites
    significantly less often, and to less severe sentences than blacks.
    The forty years war on drugs has been the front door of what can only be described
    as the prison state, in which African Americans are 13% of the population but more
    than 40% of the prisoners, and the chief interactions of government with young black
    males is policing, the courts and imprisonment. Given all that, the beginning of the
    end of marijuana prohibition, first in Colorado and soon to be followed by other
    states ought to be great good news. But not necessarily.

    Ask yourself, what would it look like if policymakers wanted to end the prohibition of
    marijuana, but not necessarily the the war on drugs. What if they desired to lock
    down the potential economic opportunities opened up by legalizing weed to
    themselves and their class, to a handful of their wealthy and well-connected friends
    and campaign contributors? What if they wanted to make the legal marijuana market
    safe for predatory agribusiness, which would like to claim lucrative patents on all the
    genetic varieties of marijuana which can be legally grown, as they already try to do
    with other crops?
    Read more: http://www.blackagendareport.com/content/end-marijuana-prohibition-end-war-drugs-probably-not
     
  2. Fine1952

    Fine1952 Happy Winter Solstice MEMBER

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    After taking into consideration the fact that cannabis is a "gub'ment" construct ran by a very organized operative, that operative thus controls the ebb and flow....therefore the answer is no.
     
  3. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I think we would still be better off. There's quite a number of drug offenders in prison over soft-drugs like Marijuana.

    Some people would definitely profit, but if it eases the prison population and lowers the level of violence (i.e there being one less drug to kill over) that's a good thing in my book.
     
  4. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Interesting Gorilla,

    Do you think it would ease prison population?
     
  5. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I believe it would just by eliminating all of those people who are arrested and have their life prospects ruined over a petty drug conviction.

    The article talks about the profit motive, but it doesn't really address why this can't be an effect of a policy that legalizes weed.
     
  6. Orisons

    Orisons Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    What if policymakers wanted to make marijuana safe for taxation and corporate profit, but needed to make sure legalization didn't produce new jobs and economic opportunities for poor and working class communities, or make them lay off any cops and judges, or have to close any prisons or jails?

    Well, the model in place in Colorado today would be a good start.

    "Ask yourself, what would it look like if policymakers wanted to end the prohibition of marijuana, but not necessarily the the war on drugs..."

    The forty years of so-called “war on drugs” has been the rhetorical excuse for a nationwide policy of punitive overpolicing in black and brown communities. Although black and white rates of drug use have been virtually identical, law enforcement strategies focused police resources almost exclusively upon communities of color.
    Prosecutors and judges did their bit as well, charging and convicting whites significantly less often, and to less severe sentences than blacks.

    The forty years war on drugs has been the front door of what can only be described as the prison state, in which African Americans are 13% of the population but more than 40% of the prisoners, and the chief interactions of government with young black males is policing, the courts and imprisonment.

    Given all that, the beginning of the end of marijuana prohibition, first in Colorado and soon to be followed by other states ought to be great good news. But not necessarily.

    Ask yourself, what would it look like if policymakers wanted to end the prohibition of marijuana, but not necessarily the the war on drugs. What if they desired to lock down the potential economic opportunities opened up by legalizing weed to themselves and their class, to a handful of their wealthy and well-connected friends and campaign contributors?

    What if they wanted to make the legal marijuana market safe for predatory agribusiness, which would like to claim lucrative patents on all the genetic varieties of marijuana which can be legally grown, as they already try to do with other crops?

    Read more: http://www.blackagendareport.com/content/end-marijuana-prohibition-end-war-drugs-probably-not[/quote]Hasn’t their alleged WAR ON DRUGS ALWAYS been rhetorical BS, as very very spectacularly highlighted in the 1980’s by the manner in which the CIA deliberately flooded African American communities with cocaine, so as to generate funds for their subversive activities backing the Contra rebels in Nicaragua?
    Aren’t drug sales and revenue like any other commodity with regard to being completely dependent on demand, which is why warring on the dealers of varying levels/supply chain is in fact a complete waste of time, isn’t it?
    As someone who has smoked one packet of cigarettes [MORE when that brand was launched, I smoked a free sample] along with having a couple of puffs on a spliff [I felt nothing] when I was a teenager, I have ALWAYS been totally mystified by the allure of both the legal drugs like cigarettes and alcohol, and the illegal drugs, in that I like REALITY, truly don’t feel the need for a vehicle to escape from the rest of the world; whereas isn’t that exactly what most ABUSERS as opposed to just in control users of substances, want?
    Can anyone highlight any harmful drug or substance being used in an addictive manner that is being handed out on the street corners anywhere on this planet for FREE?
    In fact isn’t it the ultimate POWER PLAY by our so maliciously manipulative CONTROLLERS/POWER ELITE that people have to find the cash to pay for whatever drug or substances they are using to at best harm themselves, in the worst case scenario totally destroy themselves?
    Now can you relate to the difficulty I have relating to the so consistently strong demand for both legal and illegal drugs worldwide, in that why should I or anyone even marginally rational pay hard earned cash [enriching PARASITES far and near] to destroy myself?
    Isn’t ANYONE who genuinely believes they are not programmed
    graphically illustrating that their programming is COMPLETE?
     
  7. RAPTOR

    RAPTOR Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Did you click on the link to read the rest of the article?:

    "The end of marijuana prohibition is not designed to create jobs in our communities, nor is it intended to shrink the prison state..."
    Read the rest: http://www.blackagendareport.com/content/end-marijuana-prohibition-end-war-drugs-probably-not
     
  8. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Yes, I read it. It did not talk about why the the legalization of marijuana couldn't help with this:
    https://s3.amazonaws.com/s3.documentcloud.org/documents/708721/aclu.pdf

    It mostly focuses on the creation of jobs and the barriers of entering the business which are legitimate concerns, but how come it doesn't talk about the drug testing barrier poor people face much more often than affluent people?

    https://www.aclu.org/criminal-law-reform/drug-testing

    Testing doesn't include just jobs. Often times it can influence a minority or poor individual's ability to access public benefits which also helps deal with some of the social causes of crime.

    Of course people will still test for other drugs, but policies like this eliminate one more silly barrier from employment and make one less route to prison since marijuana is a far more popular drug than harder substances (http://bigstory.ap.org/article/study-marijuana-top-illegal-drug-used-worldwide).

    Marijuana legalization in the United States is a start, and I hope to see more states move towards sensible drug policies even if they have to drag the federal government kicking and screaming.
     
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