Black Money Business Jobs : Interesting Theory: Pre-Civil War Slavery was Illegal and Unconstitutional

Discussion in 'Black Money Business Jobs' started by Shikamaru, Oct 27, 2012.

  1. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  2. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    But, Africans weren't considered "Englishmen" in Britain any more than we were considered "citizens" in the Americas.

    But, yeah, "interesting THEORY."


     
  3. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Slavery in the British Isles

    ...
    Enslaved Africans

    Admiral Sir John Hawkins of Plymouth, a notable Elizabethan seafarer, is widely acknowledged to be "the Pioneer of the English Slave Trade". In 1554–1555, Hawkins formed a slave trading syndicate of wealthy merchants. He sailed with three ships for the Caribbean via Sierra Leone, hijacked a Portuguese slave ship and sold the 300 slaves from it in Santo Domingo. During a second voyage in 1564, his crew captured 400 Africans and sold them at Rio de la Hacha in present-day Colombia, making a 60% profit for his financiers. A third voyage involved both buying slaves directly in Africa and capturing a Portuguese ship with its cargo; upon reaching the Caribbean, Hawkins sold all the slaves. On his return, he published a book entitled An Alliance to Raid for Slaves. Though Britain was a leader in the Atlantic slave trade, almost all of the slaves concerned were transported from Africa to the Americas and never saw the British Isles. Of those who did arrive in Britain, most worked as household servants..

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_British_Isles
     
  4. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    The Slavery Abolition Act 1833 (citation 3 & 4 Will. IV c. 73) was an 1833 Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom abolishing slavery throughout the British Empire (with the exceptions "of the Territories in the Possession of the East India Company," the "Island of Ceylon," and "the Island of Saint Helena", which exceptions were eliminated in 1843).[1] The Act was repealed in 1998 as part of a wider rationalisation of English statute law, but later anti-slavery legislation remains in force.

    ...In 1772, Lord Mansfield's judgement in the Somersett's Case emancipated a slave in England, which helped launch the movement to abolish slavery.[2] While slavery was unsupported by law in England and Scotland and no authority could be exercised on slaves entering English or Scottish soil, this did not yet apply to the rest of the British Empire.[3] In 1785, English poet William Cowper wrote: "We have no slaves at home – Then why abroad? Slaves cannot breathe in England; if their lungs receive our air, that moment they are free. They touch our country, and their shackles fall. That's noble, and bespeaks a nation proud. And jealous of the blessing. Spread it then, And let it circulate through every vein."[4] By 1783, an anti-slavery movement to abolish the slave trade throughout the Empire had begun among the British public.
    In 1808, after Parliament passed the Slave Trade Act of 1807, the Royal Navy established the West Africa Squadron. The squadron's task was to suppress the Atlantic slave tradeby patrolling the coast of West Africa. It did suppress the slave trade, but did not stop it entirely. It is possible that, when slave ships were in danger of being captured by the Royal Navy, some captains may have ordered the slaves to be thrown into the sea to reduce the fines they had to pay. Between 1808 and 1860 the West Africa Squadron captured 1,600 slave ships and freed 150,000 Africans.[5][6]
    Notwithstanding what had been done to suppress the trade, further measures were soon discovered to be necessary, and in 1823, theAnti-Slavery Society was founded. Members included Joseph Sturge, Thomas Clarkson, William Wilberforce, Henry Brougham, Thomas Fowell Buxton, Elizabeth Heyrick, Mary Lloyd, Jane Smeal, Elizabeth Pease and Anne Knight.[

    ...http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_Abolition_Act_1833
     
  5. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This is true, however, are you aware of the R. v. Knowles, ex parte Somersett (1772) Case?

    James Somersett wasn't an Englishmen, but the law freed him nonetheless.

    He was freed because of that case as well as slavery being barred from England.

    Now, Mansfield avoided the moral question of slavery ruling the case on technicalities due to the potential political and economic consequences.

    Also of note, the ruling didn't affect the slave trade as participated by England or end slavery in other parts of the British Empire.

    Hence, why I titled my thread such :).
     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Thanks for sharing.

    Gimme some time to digest all this, and I'll get back to ya.
     
  7. Shikamaru

    Shikamaru Well-Known Member MEMBER

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