Black People : INNER CITY CHESS CHAMPS

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Kemetstry, Aug 21, 2015.

  1. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Here is another example of what happens when brothers enter a new sport, or competition, especially the ones where a higher mental ability is demanded–we always dominate it!!!
    You see,… the only way the others can win is if they forcibly prevent us from competing.
    We all must learn from the example set by these young Americans in Detroit, and understand that what breeds success is nurture rather than nature,and the proof is staring at you right in front of your face.
    …why hate?…I know it must be scary…lol.
    In Detroit, where the school district runs a budget deficit and crime is rampant on the its blighted-out streets, the game of chess is making a difference. What started out as an after-school program has become the Detroit City Chess Club, and their domination over the entire competitive chess community, is profound and definitive.
    President Obama is just the tip of the iceberg…and he is not the last!!!…Even if the world tells you that you are trash…KNOW that you are a Champion, and a King at all things on this earth!!!!




    <iframe width="420" height="315" src="https://www.youtube.com/embed/l7AQLvmPlaM" frameborder="0" allowfullscreen></iframe>





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  2. Black Phoenix

    Black Phoenix Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Wonderful! This is such a great game for the kids to get involved in! It's mentally stimulating, teaches strategy, patience, innovation and other skills to help them be successful in life and best of all it's CHEAP! It's also something they can get apps for on their phones, tablets as well as their other computers so they can play by themselves as well as others.
     
  3. Black Phoenix

    Black Phoenix Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    One Move Ahead of Opponents, and Two Ahead of Trouble
    By DYLAN LOEB MCCLAIN JUNE 28, 2011 12:02 PM June 28, 2011 12:02 pm
    [​IMG]Michelle V. Agins/The New York TimesJames Black Jr. playing chess at Fulton Park, near his home in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.

    It is impossible to miss that James Black Jr. is a chess champion when you walk into his home in Bedford-Stuyvesant, Brooklyn.

    Three trophies, each nearly three feet tall, sit on the floor in front of a fish tank. Other trophies crowd the floor in front of a living room cabinet that is covered with more trophies, many with medals dangling from them. There is an inlaid chess board on the coffee table in the center of the room with carved wooden pieces, and another board on the kitchen table.

    James, 12, is a seventh grader at Intermediate School 318 in South Williamsburg, a perennial powerhouse in chess. Though the school’s teams have many talented players, James stands out.

    He is the second-best player in the school, based on the ranking system used by the United States Chess Federation, the game’s governing body. And he is on the cusp of becoming a national master, the second-highest title awarded by the federation and one that fewer than 2 percent of its active members have earned.

    In April, James led his team to the championship of the kindergarten through eighth grade section of the Junior High School Chess Nationals in Columbus, Ohio. James tied for first in his section.

    [​IMG]Michelle V. Agins/The New York TimesJames at home with his dad.
    James learned to play chess five years ago from his father, James Black Sr., but within a couple of weeks, James was winning most of their games.

    “Throughout my life, whatever my dad showed me, I was interested,” James Jr. said the other day. “I tried to beat him at other things, but he’s always destroying me.”

    Some of the school’s players come from families where chess is seen as a way to avoid trouble, and James is a particularly stark example. He has two older half-brothers by his mother. One spent 33 months in prison for selling drugs and was released in 2009. The other, Terrance Daniels, 19, was convicted of murder in 2009 and is serving 20 years to life at the maximum-security prison in Elmira, N.Y.

    James also has a half-sister, Tanique Daniels, 18, who was thrown out of the house this spring by James’s father after a series of arguments.

    Photos of James and his siblings line the walls of his house on Stuyvesant Avenue, ghostly reminders of an earlier family life.

    James, who can be quiet around strangers, said that he missed his siblings. “I kind of get lonely at night,” he said.

    He said that he was “a little disappointed” in Terrance and that he did not understand how he could have murdered someone. “That just doesn’t seem like him,” he said, and added, “He has to do his time and I guess hopefully he’ll come out soon.”

    James’s coach at I.S. 318, Elizabeth Vicary, said that the difference in James’s life has been the commitment of his father.

    “I see his dad more than I see any other parent,” Ms. Vicary said. “I feel like his dad is kind of saving him. James is not going to become a street punk. He is going to get a great education because his dad is going to see that happens.”

    James Black Sr., a deli clerk at a D’Agostino’s supermarket, acknowledged that he kept a close eye on his son and that young James sometimes chafed against his rules — limits on video-game time chief among them — and wondered why his older siblings seemed to have more freedom. “He asks plenty of times, ‘Why can they do things that I can’t?’ ” Mr. Black said.

    James has also been studying with a grandmaster, Alexander Stripunsky. The money for the weekly lessons, which run $200, has come from a private benefactor and the nonprofit Chess-in-the-Schools program. The lessons are paid through August, but there is uncertainty about how the cost will be covered after that.

    Read more:http://cityroom.blogs.nytimes.com/2011/06/28/one-move-ahead-of-opponents-and-two-ahead-of-trouble/
     
    Last edited: Aug 21, 2015
  4. Black Phoenix

    Black Phoenix Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The Chess Drum'sHistoric MomentsA LEGACY OF EXCELLENCE: A Brief History of Black Chess Masters in Americaby Gregory Kearse [​IMG]
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    Reproduced at The Chess Drum with written permission from Mr. Gregory Kearse.This article appeared in Chess Life, July 1998 edition.



    [​IMG]eputations are not easy to come by in chess. Only a history of excellence and success over the board will propel a player into the limelight, push him into the upper regions of the elite and stardom. Two nationally recognized African-American players, Maurice Ashley and Emory Tate, have done exactly that for nearly two decades. Surprisingly, for a lot of chess players, other African-Americans chess players have mastered the game but perhaps get less attention nationally.

    Many of the 86,000 United States Chess Federation (USCF) players know something about the history of the top players: Maurice Ashley in 1993 became the first African-American to be awarded the coveted title of International Master, and Emory Tate (who has two IM norms) had been the perennial U.S. Armed Forces Champion and the grassroots people's choice for Grandmaster in training.However, these two titans, along with numerous other black chess masters, constitute a large stable of highly distinguished mavens of the game. Coming to mind are Morris Giles (FM), Irvin Middleton (FM), Ron Simpson(SM), Willie Morrison (SM), Greg Acholonu (SM), Ron Buckmeyer (SM), Norm Rogers (FM), Steve Booth, andGeorge Umezinwa, to name but a few.

    HISTORICALLY SPEAKINGHistorically, there have been some 40 bona fide black chess masters. Further, there are many more black senior masters than most people realize. Most players, black or white do not even realize that back in the 1850s there was a formidable black problemist. He was an African-American by the name of Theophilus Thompson, who put together a book of chess problems (albeit not a very good one, to the taste of bookseller Fred Wilson). Copies of the book are rare.

    On the forget-me-not list is K.K. Karanga, the young African-American genius (literally) who made it before trudging off to study at Yale. It is not clear whether it was he or Howard Daniels who became the youngest African-American to make U.S. master. But, let's not get too far ahead of this fascinating story.

    In 1963, America was on the verge of a cultural explosion that would touch our lives and alter its very social fabric. Even in the world of chess, with its then exclusive clubs and its odd assortment of esoteric warriors, a minor revolution had taken place. America produced its first black chess master. His name was Walt Harris, an unassuming, dedicated scientist who for some years worked at the U.S. Naval Observatory in Washington, D.C., the nation's capitol and a strong urban chess center.CRADLE OF BLACK CHESSAs a matter of fact, one can claim the greater Washington, D.C. metropolitan area as the cradle of black chess in America, for over the next few years, some time during the middle phases of the U.S. incursion into the Vietnam conflict, Ken Clayton and his protégé, Frank Street, became chess masters, in 1965 and 1967, respectively.

    Further, at one time, the Washington D.C. vicinity was the current or former home of masters: William Morrison, Ken Clayton, Barry Davis, Frank Street, Greg Acholonu, Emory Tate, Vincent Moore, Charles Green, Glenn Umstead, Charles Covington, Andre Surgeon, Tony Randolph, Walter Harris and Ms. Baraka Shabazz (more about her later).

    When one looks at the other black masters spread out across the country, the contemporary list of masters is impressive. But it was not always this way, especially for this nation's first black master, Harris, who now lives in the Bay area in California. Harris waxes with nostalgic with, "It was lonely when I came up." He said that he was very pleased by Maurice Ashley's success and hinted that at least he (Ashley) has other black masters who surround and support him. His sharp, clear voice tries to conceal both the pain and the pride of his accomplishment.


    Read more: http://www.thechessdrum.net/historicmoments/HM_BlackChess/
     
  5. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    The operative word is cheap. lol

    If you can memorize the lyrics to every pop song, you can learn this and other skills





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  6. Kemetstry

    Kemetstry going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    They are national champs two years in a row. So I think they are in good shape






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