Africa : Indigenous AFRICAN Perspectives on "white supremacy"

Omowale Jabali

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Question:

What African authored texts, articles, or other source materials specifically address the issue of "white supremacy" EXACTLY in those terms?

I am not asking for sources from "African Americans" or white academics.

Specifically, Africans, on the continent, who equate "racism" with "white supremacy" and explain it in those terms.
 

cherryblossom

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Question:

What African authored texts, articles, or other source materials specifically address the issue of "white supremacy" EXACTLY in those terms?

I am not asking for sources from "African Americans" or white academics.

Specifically, Africans, on the continent, who equate "racism" with "white supremacy" and explain it in those terms.
Wonderful topic! :toast:

I'd be interested in the same.
 

awo dino

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carpenter, anthropologist, teacher. Right now I te
Question:

What African authored texts, articles, or other source materials specifically address the issue of "white supremacy" EXACTLY in those terms?

I am not asking for sources from "African Americans" or white academics.

Specifically, Africans, on the continent, who equate "racism" with "white supremacy" and explain it in those terms.
Are you saying you don't think there are, or is this an honest question.
 

Omowale Jabali

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Honest question

Are you saying you don't think there are, or is this an honest question.[/QUOTE]

Which remains unanswered.
 

Ikoro

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Well, since no one has answered...

Author of "The West and The Rest of Us", amongst other titles: Chinweizu.

Think he also recently did something on negrophobia, but I doubt he coined the termed (although he claims to have done so, I believe).

Let's start with him, let's see if anyone can mention a female - I have a few up my sleeve.

One,

- Ikoro
 

Amnat77

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Léopold Sédar Senghor


Léopold Sédar Senghor was born in Senegal in 1906, and was a politician, poet and post-colonial theorist. He was president of Senegal from 1960 to 1980. He was a well-known writer and theorist who, together with Aimé Césaire of Martinique and Léon Damas of Guyana, spearheaded the Négritude movement which began in the 1930s. Most of his theories were first conceived in the 1920s and 1930s, and his work is an early attempt to create a consistent theory of modern African writing. Through his contribution as theorist on Négritude, Senghor has had a profound influence on African literature and on post-colonial discourse, and was also influential in the Afro-American Black consciousness movement.

Négritude can probably best be defined as a black sense of solidarity as a group, as well as a belief in the unity and excellence of a universal black culture. Négritude was born out of a response to white cultural domination, in order to reassert black identity. In all of Senghor's writing he posits a distinctive African culture based on specifically African rhythms and images.

In Senghor's arguments for decolonisation, he cites the necessity for a re-education process for both black and white, in that both need to reconsider the conditions under which white came to have certain meanings (usually associated with dominance and superiority) and black came to have other meanings associated with a disadvantaged position in relation to whites. However, other theorists have noted that within Senghor's assertions he adopted stereotypes which reflected European prejudice. For example, that black culture is something that is seen as emotional rather than rational.

Senghor's theories have been described as essentialist in that he argues that the Negro possesses an essence that is unique and separate from other races, and that the Negro can make a distinct contribution to a hybrid universal culture. However, first the Negro must regain his identity and the white world must recognise his values and cultural heritage. Therefore, when Senghor writes of the relationship between Europe and Africa, he argues for the relationship to be one of symbiosis, rather than one dominating the other. Négritude also claims a distinctive African view of time-space relationships, ethics, metaphysics, and an aesthetics which separates itself from European taste and style. Unfortunately, as pointed out by Wole Soyinka, this has also meant that it risks being reincorporated into a European model in which it functions only as the antithesis of the thesis of white supremacy, rather than the model of symbiosis as envisioned by Senghor. Therefore, Négritude can be seen to remain within the parameters of the essential binary nature of the western philosophical tradition.

http://dlibrary.acu.edu.au/staffhome/siryan/Academy/theory_history/..\theory_history\senghor, leopold.htm


Prayer to the Masks

by: Léopold Sédar Senghor

`Masks! Masks!
Black masks, red masks, you masks black and white -
Masks at all four points from whence the spirit breathes -
In silence I salute you!
And not least of all you, my lion-headed ancestor,
You keeper of holy places forbidden...
You who have painted this picture of my face over an altar of white
paper
In your own image...hear me!
Here dies the Africa of Empires - it is the agony of a ruined
princess
And of Europe to whose navel we are bound.
 

Amnat77

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***warning very long essay*****

Wole Soyinka

Baba Soyinka is related to Fela Kuti.


Is that perhaps too stark a paradox? Then let me take you back to Hola Camp. It is cattle which are objects of the stick, or whip. So are horses, goats, donkeys etc. Their definition therefore involves being occasionally beaten to death. If, thirty years after Hola Camp, it is at all thinkable that it takes the ingenuity of the most sophisticated electronic interference to kill an African resistance fighter, the champions of racism are already admitting to themselves what they continue to deny to the world: that they, white supremacist breed, have indeed come a long way in their definition of their chosen enemy since Hola Camp. They have come an incredibly long way since Sharpeville when they shot unarmed, fleeing Africans in the back. They have come very far since 1930 when, at the first organized incident of the burning of passes, the South African blacks decided to turn Dingaan's Day, named for the defeat of the Zulu leader Dingaan, into a symbol of affirmative resistance by publicly destroying their obnoxious passes. In response to those thousands of passes burnt on Cartright Flats, the Durban police descended on the unarmed protesters killing some half dozen and wounding hundreds. They backed it up with scorched earth campaign which dispersed thousands of Africans from their normal environment, victims of imprisonment and deportation. And even that 1930 repression was a quantum leap from that earlier, spontaneous protest against the Native Pass law in 1919, when the police merely rode down the protesters on horseback, whipped and sjamboked them, chased and harried them, like stray goats and wayward cattle, from street corner to shanty lodge. Every act of racial terror, with its vastly increasing sophistication of style and escalation in human loss, is itself an acknowledgement of improved knowledge and respect for the potential of what is feared, an acknowledgement of the sharpening tempo of triumph by the victimized.
 

abdurratln

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***warning very long essay*****

Wole Soyinka

Baba Soyinka is related to Fela Kuti.


Is that perhaps too stark a paradox? Then let me take you back to Hola Camp. It is cattle which are objects of the stick, or whip. So are horses, goats, donkeys etc. Their definition therefore involves being occasionally beaten to death. If, thirty years after Hola Camp, it is at all thinkable that it takes the ingenuity of the most sophisticated electronic interference to kill an African resistance fighter, the champions of racism are already admitting to themselves what they continue to deny to the world: that they, white supremacist breed, have indeed come a long way in their definition of their chosen enemy since Hola Camp. They have come an incredibly long way since Sharpeville when they shot unarmed, fleeing Africans in the back. They have come very far since 1930 when, at the first organized incident of the burning of passes, the South African blacks decided to turn Dingaan's Day, named for the defeat of the Zulu leader Dingaan, into a symbol of affirmative resistance by publicly destroying their obnoxious passes. In response to those thousands of passes burnt on Cartright Flats, the Durban police descended on the unarmed protesters killing some half dozen and wounding hundreds. They backed it up with scorched earth campaign which dispersed thousands of Africans from their normal environment, victims of imprisonment and deportation. And even that 1930 repression was a quantum leap from that earlier, spontaneous protest against the Native Pass law in 1919, when the police merely rode down the protesters on horseback, whipped and sjamboked them, chased and harried them, like stray goats and wayward cattle, from street corner to shanty lodge. Every act of racial terror, with its vastly increasing sophistication of style and escalation in human loss, is itself an acknowledgement of improved knowledge and respect for the potential of what is feared, an acknowledgement of the sharpening tempo of triumph by the victimized.
What was the question again? Or did I miss something. I sure did not read all that garbage. Usually,when I see something under Senghor's name followed by "negritude", I find better things to do wthmy time.

I sure hope you are not trying to "hijack" this thread with some discussion of "negriude" and other such well discredited nonsense. Bury that mess so that we can move on to better things in life.
 

Amnat77

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Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti


FRK’S WORLD VIEW OF EGALITARIANISM
Issues of race, class and gender by and large comprise Funmilayo Ransome-Kuti’s
world view of egalitarianism. According to her biographers, although FRK
successfully argued against a purely racial analysis of colonialism, she saw race as
a critical factor, for instance, when she dropped her one European name while in
England. The biographers then elucidate FRK’s sensitivity on race, referring to
Soyinka’s Aké. Soyinka, as a child knew the Ransome-Kutis well, for example
often visiting in their home in Abeokuta. He writes that FRK was appalled by the
dropping of the atomic bomb on the cities of Hiroshima and Nagasaki in 1945. In a
heated conversation with a British District Officer of Abeokuta after the bombing,
she insisted that it was a racist act. She argued that they would never have dropped
it on Germany, because “Germany is a white race, the Germans are your kinsmen.
While the Japanese are just a dirty yellow people. I know you, the white mentality:
Japanese, Chinese, Africans, we are all subhuman. You would drop an atom bomb
on Abeokuta or any of your colonies if it suited you!” (Fnl 40-1; Soyinka 1989:
224)
While the travel to the United States in the end of the Sixties radicalized Fela
Kuti, there is no evidence, according to the biographers, that FRK made any
political contacts during her study years in England from 1919-22 that shaped her
later radicalism (Fnl 125). It is mainly in the 1940s that her world view radicalized.
In 1944 the Abeokuta Ladies Club (ALC) expanded its ranks to include market
women, and in 1946 ALC became the Abeokuta Women’s Union, signaling its new
emphasis on poor women’s issues. And it was in 1949 that the abdication of the
traditional ruler occurred, which even then became a legend. In Nigeria,
regionalization and ethnicity has often more or less characterized politics. The
biographers in several occasions emphasize that FKR was not an ethnicist. While
nationalism was a fundamental tenet of the anticolonial struggle and was sometimes
obscured or fractured by ethnic alliances, FRK “never fell prey” to that “false
premise” (Fnl 40). Although ’class’ is for the biographers a general category


http://www.njas.helsinki.fi/pdf-files/vol8num1/simola.pdf
 

Amnat77

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What was the question again? Or did I miss something. I sure did not read all that garbage. Usually,when I see something under Senghor's name followed by "negritude", I find better things to do wthmy time.

I sure hope you are not trying to "hijack" this thread with some discussion of "negriude" and other such well discredited nonsense. Bury that mess so that we can move on to better thingsin life.
Can you read English?
 

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