Pan Africanism : In pictures: Nigerian Igbo wedding

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by panafrica, Mar 6, 2006.

  1. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  2. HoneyBrown05

    HoneyBrown05 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Those wedding pics are beautiful!
     
  3. NNQueen

    NNQueen going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Nice pictures

    Thank you Brother Pan for sharing the pictures. How beautiful everyone was and the ceremonial dress was stunning. I love the different colors the bride wore and those hats....looked more like crowns they were so elegant. I would be interested in knowing more about the cultural traditions of the ceremony, i.e., why the bride changed clothes so often and why the final gown was white, the significance of the plum wine and the gourd shaped cake. What's the custom behind her having to look through the crowd for her groom? I'm also wondering whether those were braids in her hair. And her chisled features and skin tone were intereting to me from a archeological/historical point of view. Is that something due to her geographical location on the Continent caused by a certain mix of people? I know someone here knows the answers, so please share what you know.

    Queenie :heart:
     
  4. militant

    militant Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Thanks Brother. Black women are beautiful.
     
  5. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That's an understatement!
     
  6. kemetkind

    kemetkind Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    They Sure Are...All of Them!


    Yeah it is an understatement.

    Not trying to be argumentative, but I do find it fascinating you're willing to classify that sister as "Black." The bride looks no more/less black than the woman in the article you posted a few weeks ago about the "mixed" couple that had a white twin.

    When you get down to brass tacts, your concept of the "black" race really isn't any different than mine brother Pan!
     
  7. kemetkind

    kemetkind Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  8. jamesfrmphilly

    jamesfrmphilly going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    i was gonna ask how all dem African women got all dat straight hair........
     
  9. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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    I PEEPED THAT TOO.
     
  10. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Kemetkind:

    I believe the primary reason for your confusion is that you’re being presumptuous. You are both over analyzing the pictures of this article and making assumptions without knowing the facts. Your first assumption is that I included the bride in the statement that “black women are beautiful”, and that I was referencing this article specifically when I co-signed brother Militant’s statement; instead of my agreeing with the statement in general. The second assumption that you are making is about this woman’s heritage, without knowing exactly what it is (neither one of us does). The bride could be a light skinned black person, they do exist you know (I happen to be one of them). One thing which too many people don’t seem to realize is that skin tone differences are natural within the black race. I know many continental Africans from Kenya and Nigeria (Igbo) that are light brown skinned with absolutely no racial mixture. Just because a black person isn’t as dark as Manute Bol or Alec Wek doesn’t automatically mean they have mixed blood. This being said, the bride could actually be a mulatto (which also exist in Africa) just like the two mulattos you are comparing her to. That being the case, it would render the point you are trying to make moot! Again without knowing I can not say, and neither can you.

    There are two major factors that makes the couple in the “black and white twin” article not black but biracial. One is their direct lineage, and the second is their self identification. Their appearance is not the most important consideration. Their heritage is the most important consideration and that heritage will determine their self identification. That being the case: It isn’t what “I” (PanAfrica) consider them to be, but what they consider themselves to be. Indeed what they consider themselves to be, and how that consideration is manifested in their social-behavior (dating, marriage, and mating). The two individuals who became parents of those black and white twins are biracial. They classify “themselves” as biracial, and that identification is based on their having parents who belong to different races. Since they have a parent of another race who not only created them; but raised them, there is no other basis to classify themselves as anything differently than biracial. In this particular case though, while these two individuals might “look black” to some, their white parentage was/is present in their genes and manifested itself through one of their offspring (who is definitely beyond being light skinned).

    Now back to the heritage of the Igbo bride, she could be very well be biracial. I really have no way of telling and I don’t really care! It isn’t important to the topic of Igbo wedding traditions. However if she is biracial, then I’m glad she decided to marry a black man, instead of continuing her black parent’s example of diluting the black race. I’ve stated before that a marriage/mating between a mulatto and a black man/woman is the only “interracial” relationship I approve of; as it is the only one that comes close to the goal of continuing the existence of the black people.

    Now that this has been said….those are some beautiful outfits in that wedding aren’t they?
     
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