Black People : In Brazil, a mix of racial openness and exclusion

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Clyde C Coger Jr, Mar 17, 2013.

  1. Clyde C Coger Jr

    Clyde C Coger Jr going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    In the Spirit of Sankofa,




    ... What de Lima says is so true; "Here it's a racism of exclusion," de Lima said. And she's beautiful while saying it :rofl:



    [​IMG]

    This photo taken Feb. 25, 2013, shows Nubia de Lima, 29, posing for a photo in her Rio de Janeiro apartment in Brazil. De Lima, a black producer for Globo television network, says she experiences racism on a daily basis in the reactions and comments of strangers, who continuously assume she's a maid, nanny or cook, despite her flair for fashion and pricey wardrobe. "People aren't used to seeing black people in positions of power," she said. She added that upper middle-class black people like herself are in a kind of limbo, too affluent and educated to live in favelas but still largely excluded from high-rent white neighborhoods. (AP Photo/Felipe Dana)



    In Brazil, a mix of racial openness and exclusion

    RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Many Brazilians cast their country as racial democracy where people of different groups long have intermarried, resulting in a large mixed-race population. But you need only turn on the TV, open the newspaper or stroll down the street to see clear evidence of segregation.
    In Brazil, whites are at the top of the social pyramid, dominating professions of wealth, prestige and power. Dark-skinned people are at the bottom of the heap, left to clean up after others and take care of their children and the elderly.
    http://news.yahoo.com/brazil-mix-racial-openness-exclusion-115423389.html


    Peace In,
     
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