Black Spirituality Religion : Ifa Symbol for Male/Female Principles

Discussion in 'Black Spirituality / Religion - General Discussion' started by river, Sep 21, 2013.

  1. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

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    I know that the Egyptians have the Ankh and the Asians have Yin and Yang, but what is the symbol for the male/female principles in Ifa?
     
  2. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Ifa describes things in terms of contraction and expansion. As I understand what I have been taught the action of contraction is feminine and the action of expansion is masculine.
     
  3. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

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    Hey Blackbird,

    Thanks for the info. I'm wondering is there a specific symble in Ifa. Or to be more exact, I am interested in Candomblé. I will use this symbology in my second novel as a sequel to The Crossroads of Time. One of the major characters in this book is a Candomblé priestess. Don't worry, I will not disclose any esoteric information in this book
     
  4. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Sister River,

    I wish you great success on your second novel. I will need to get the first when I have time. The title is very intriguing. What I would say, and take what I say with a grain of salt since I am neither an authority nor an initiated Ifa-Orisa priest, is as I understand it the symbol (I) represents contraction and the symbol of (II) represents expansion.

    Thus I see it working like this: I = Contraction
    II = Expansion

    Here is an image of the main 16 Ifa Odu:

    [​IMG]
     
  5. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

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    Oh Wow!

    I like the way things are coming together here. This symbology is perfect because my characters will be conducting a jogo de buzios (divination). I will do more research in this direction.

    Thanks
     
  6. LMagere

    LMagere Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    This may not be relevant but...

    An interesting point about most Bantu languages is they are no words for “he” or “she”. You can’t say he/she went that way, you have to say the man/woman/boy/ girl/child etc. went that way. Leading me to believe there is an importance in knowing who you are talking about. So that weather something is male or female is not as important as what you know about them. “They” is used when you do not know much about who you are talking about to the point that you are not willing to say if they are male or female.
     
  7. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

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    That is interesting information. I may be able to work it into this novel.
     
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