Black People : If Alive at his Monument, What would Dr King say about the State of Black America??

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Ankhur, Oct 20, 2011.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    For one, why set the man in stone, like one cursed into the side of a mountain for eternity? (symbolic of permanent imobility of his REAL legacy and struggle)

    vvWell, we’re turning right now to our next guest, who has written extensively on civil rights issues and the impoverished condition of African Americans, which he says are the same as they were in Martin Luther King’s day. Yes, this weekend, President Obama dedicated the Dr. Martin Luther King Monument in Washington, D.C. Lewis Diuguid is a columnist and editorial board member of the Kansas City Star. He’s also author of Discovering the Real America: Toward a More Perfect Union and the book A Teacher’s Cry: Expose the Truth about Education Today.
    Welcome to Democracy Now! It’s good to see you again, Lewis.
    LEWIS DIUGUID: It’s good to be here. Thank you.
    AMY GOODMAN: This dedication of Dr. King—if he were alive today, what would his thoughts be, do you think?
    LEWIS DIUGUID: I think he would look at America as being an unfinished work, as it has always been from the start, but particularly when it comes to people of color and when it comes to people who are poor. We have a problem in this country when you see the 46 million people are living in poverty, when you see 50 million people have no health insurance. When this exists, then all of that flows into the schools. The schools are really ill-equipped to be able to pick up the problems that poverty creates in families and with children and find a way to educate the kids, because the concentration is so scattered. We also have a situation in which the schools are providing breakfast and lunch for children, in which they can’t provide it for themselves, I mean, with free and reduced breakfast and lunch programs. And so, the schools are having to do more and more to help these kids and help these families.
    AMY GOODMAN: What do you think needs to be done? And what do you think President Obama should be doing right now?
    LEWIS DIUGUID: Well, to go back to the dedication of the King Memorial in Washington, D.C., I think it’s great that that’s there. But unfortunately, for a lot people, they’ll see this as being: "We’re done. We don’t have to do anything more. We have satisfied the whole need to address African Americans. The people have their monument. Let’s move on." But the monument should stand as a testament to the unfinished work. I mean, when King was assassinated, April 4 of 1968, he was on his way to Washington to lead marches that were set up for addressing poverty as an ongoing concern.
    AMY GOODMAN: The Poor People’s March.
    LEWIS DIUGUID: Absolutely. And at the time, we had a president who really was fixed on making the Great Society programs work. So, there were efforts to make this thing better, but unfortunately, all of the wind has been—I mean, the programs have been dismantled. The effort has been taken apart by Republican and president after president and Congress after Congress saying we don’t need these things anymore. But, in fact, we need them desperately. Who’s going to be able to pay the Social Security taxes, pay the taxes that keep the nation going? If people are living in poverty, if they don’t get a good education, if they are unable to go to college, and then can’t get good jobs, we’re in trouble.
    AMY GOODMAN: Describe the schools-to-prison pipeline that you have written about.
    LEWIS DIUGUID: It is extensive, and it is kept in good repair. Unfortunately, they say that by third grade the prison system knows how many beds that they’ll need, because of the number of kids who are failing at that point. I’m going to go to Jefferson City today to speak to the men in an NAACP branch of the prison in Jefferson City. And these are individuals who are extremely intelligent, very bright, but unfortunately, the schools let them down when they were trying to get through the system as students. And we need to fix that. I mean, we’re talking about 2.3 million Americans who are in prison. And the majority of those individuals are African Americans and Latinos. This is an unsustainable situation that we have and a trend that isn’t going to abate.
    http://www.democracynow.org/2011/10/19/amidst_soaring_poverty_new_mlk_monument
     
  2. Keita Kenyatta

    Keita Kenyatta going above and beyond PREMIUM MEMBER

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    Dr. King would tell us to get out of here. Why so? Because for those who have listened to all his speeches and have read his books, you would know what his greatest fear was. In his own words; "My greatest fear is that I'm asking our people to integrate into a burning house!" Well people, is the house burning or what?
     
  3. Zaiyah's House

    Zaiyah's House Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    The first thing he'd probably say is.... "Why in the hell is there a MADE IN CHINA stamp on the back of my monument?"
    I think soooooo very disrespectful that besides having all these "so called" Chinese restaurants in the hood, when the Chinese would never support a soul food restaurant in any Chinatown in the U.S.A, and refusing to open up the "Black Hair Care Market" to fair trade. And on top of all that they commission a Chinese Sculptor to to make the monument in China. What a joke!
     
  4. Black-king

    Black-king Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    He would probably come and say sorry to Black people for integrating them with their oppressors.
     
  5. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    I doubt Dr. King would have ever said so. During his life, unlike Garvey, King was never a "back to Africa" supporter nor any other emigration.

    The "burning house" statement spoke to Dr. King's foresight into what would be needed after integration.

     
  6. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    I doubt he'd say that either.

     
  7. Gorilla

    Gorilla Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    People couldn't read his mind while he was alive. I doubt the signal got any stronger after being dead.
     
  8. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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    Sho nuff....And all the "What Would Martin/Malcolm say..?" ruminations won't change that.

    There's no telling where our communities would be today if Martin and Malcolm had been allowed to live.

    There's no telling what they could have accomplished, separately and collectively, had they not been murdered.
     
  9. Alarm Clock

    Alarm Clock Well-Known Member MEMBER

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  10. cherryblossom

    cherryblossom Banned MEMBER

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