Haiti : Hurricane Tomas predicted to Devestate Haiti and Hurt Jamaica

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Ankhur, Nov 3, 2010.

  1. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
    One of the main reasons why Pan African Networks are Necessary at this time are that , the need is there for rpeventive and ambulatory infrastricture in many African nation and if these strctures are created,

    funded and managed by Black folks

    one can be assured of getting rid of the, usual foot dragging, corporate opportunity seeking and bullmess that goes on when other non African and non socialist agencies seek to help.

    Please pray for our sisters and brothers and send positive energy and vibes for them in thier time of need.

    Haiti urges 1 million to flee camps ahead of Tomas

    Up to 10 inches of rain expected; severe flooding is feared
    The Associated Press
    november 3, 2010

    PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - More than 1 million people were advised to leave earthquake homeless camps in Haiti's rubble-choked capital Wednesday as disaster officials watched the approach of Tropical Storm Tomas.

    But few of the earthquake survivors who have spent nearly 10 months alternately baking and soaking under plastic tarps and tents have anywhere to go.




    Painfully slow reconstruction from the quake, prior storms and the recent committing of resources to fight a growing cholera epidemic have left people with few options and overtaxed aid workers struggling to help.

    "We are using radio stations to announce to people that if they don't have a place to go, but they have friends and families, they should move into a place that is secure," said civil protection official Nadia Lochard, who oversees the department that includes Port-au-Prince.

    Concerns are even greater in the western reaches of Haiti's southern peninsula, where heavy flooding is predicted.

    Disaster officials have extended a red alert, their highest storm warning, to all regions of the country, as the storm is expected to wind its way up the west coast of Hispaniola through storm-vulnerable Gonaives and Haiti's No. 2 city, Cap-Haitien, sometime Friday.

    The U.S. National Hurricane Center in Miami announced a tropical storm warning for Haiti, along with tropical storm watches for Jamaica, the western Dominican Republic, eastern Cuba and the southeastern Bahamas as well as Turks and Caicos.

    "Tomas could be approaching hurricane strength as the center nears Haiti" on Friday, the center said.

    The storm, which strengthened from a tropical depression during the day, on Wednesday afternoon was 305 miles south of Port-au-Prince with maximum winds of 45 mph. It began to make an expected right turn toward the Greater Antilles, moving north-northwest at 6 mph.


    The center said the storm could dump up to 10 inches of rain over much of Haiti.

    Even just five inches could cause catastrophic floods in the severely deforested country, according to the U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs.

    In Jamaica, soldiers will evacuate hundreds of people in the island's eastern region Thursday and move them into emergency shelters ahead of the storm, Information Minister Daryl Vaz said.

    "We will be going all out to make good sense prevail," he said at a news conference Wednesday.

    Most of the people who will be evacuated are squatters living along unstable gullies that often flood during heavy rainstorms.

    Kareen Bennett, a forecaster with Jamaica's Meteorological Service, said heavy rains will lash the eastern region by Friday morning.

    Jamaica is still struggling to recuperate from floods unleashed by Tropical Storm Nicole in late September that killed at least 13 people and caused an estimated $125 million in damage.

    People who are still using boats to move about in the island's rural western regions also will be moved to shelters, said Ronald Jackson with the emergency management office.

    Tomas has already killed at least 14 people and left seven missing in the eastern Caribbean nation of St. Lucia, where it caused more than $37 million in damage. In nearby St. Vincent, the storm wrecked more than 1,200 homes and caused nearly $24 million in damages to crops, especially bananas — one of St. Vincent's top commodities.


    It could be the first big storm to strike Haiti since the Jan. 12 earthquake killed as many as 300,000 people and forced millions from their homes. It would also be the first tropical storm or hurricane to hit since 2008, when Fay, Gustav, Hanna and Ike battered Haiti in the space of a month, killing nearly 800 people and wiping out 15 percent of the economy.

    Aid workers are scrambling to prepare but are badly short of supplies including shelter material because of the responses already under way to deal with the aftermath of the earthquake and an unprecedented cholera outbreak that has killed more than 330 people and hospitalized more than 4,700.

    A U.S. Navy vessel, the amphibious warship Iwo Jima, was steaming toward Haiti to provide disaster relief.

    An enormous international aid effort flowed into Haiti in the immediate wake of the quake, but reconstruction has barely begun, in part because donors have not come through with promised funds. The United States has not provided any of the $1.15 billion in reconstruction aid it pledged last March.
    from msnbc news
     
  2. $$RICH$$

    $$RICH$$ Lyon King Admin. STAFF

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 21, 2001
    Messages:
    69,983
    Likes Received:
    3,978
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    BUSINESS owner
    Location:
    Da~WINDY*CITY //CHICAGO
    Ratings:
    +4,178
    wow how much more can they take !
    I do hope the storm shift direction
     
  3. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
    please pray for these 2 closest African nations to us, and in years to come we can help them build emergency preparedness programs
    that are seriously needed,

    also please check last weeks archived show of "Like it Is" with Gil Noble;
    he had 2 activists from the Haitian community here in NYC, who stated that they are working on a program to train young sisters and brothers, putting them through college, and provoding for the tuition, from their own scholarship program
    here to help form an emergency preparedness service, for Haiti
    Haitian owned and operated

    he started
    Haitians in the diaspora, from North America and Europe had sent a total of 2 billion in aid for the earthquake relief effort
     
  4. bientempo

    bientempo Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    Dominican Republic
    Joined:
    Oct 11, 2009
    Messages:
    736
    Likes Received:
    141
    Gender:
    Male
    Location:
    Dominican Republic
    Ratings:
    +165
  5. Ezinne

    Ezinne Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Aug 13, 2009
    Messages:
    675
    Likes Received:
    314
    Occupation:
    writer, filmmaker
    Ratings:
    +314
  6. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
    Many Haitians can't or won't flee nearing storm
    Jamaica, Cuba and other parts of Caribbean also at risk from Tomas

    Ariana Cubillos / AP
    Tens of thousands of Haitians on Thursday remained in tent cities like this one, which is at an air strip in Port-au-Prince and includes an abandoned aircraft as a shelter.
    msnbc.com staff and news service reports
    PORT-AU-PRINCE, Haiti - Tens of thousands of Haitians remained in precarious tent cities on Thursday, unwilling or unable to heed warnings as Tropical Storm Tomas neared with the potential to cause flash floods and claim even more lives following the massive earthquake and now cholera epidemic.

    The United Nations has warned that up to 1.5 million people — including many made homeless by the devastating January earthquake — are at risk.


    The storm was expected to brush eastern Jamaica and then regain hurricane strength before passing near western Haiti early Friday with heavy rains, according to the National Hurricane Center in Miami.

    Haiti's government urged evacuation of the emergency camps set up after the Jan. 12 earthquake.

    Unease set in among people who already lost homes and loved ones in the quake and saw their tents ripped apart in lesser storms this year.

    "The tension is elevated. People are really concerned about their belongings. They're posing a lot of legitimate questions," said Bryant Castro, a American Refugee Committee staffer at the Corail-Cesselesse camp.

    As the skies darkened over Port-au-Prince and roof-tarps started flapping Thursday morning, a policeman at Corail-Cesselesse shouted through a megaphone: "The hurricane is not a joke! ... You need to get out of here!"

    Aid workers say the camp's location at the confluence of several streams makes it particularly vulnerable to flooding.

    "We are upset because they have not told us where we are going," said Domarcand Fenel, the head of a committee of camp residents. "People believe they want to expel us."

    Survivors of the earthquake have fought forced evictions, weathered storms, organized themselves into security committees, and rallied for better services and aid. Now they are being told to leave — and few have anywhere to go.

    The government says more than 1,000 shelters are available, but that can refer to any building expected to stand up to high winds. The U.N. Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs said there is a need to identify safe potential storm shelters.

    At 11 a.m. ET, the NHC put Tomas at about 125 miles south-southeast of Kingston, Jamaica, and 295 miles southwest of Port au Prince.

    It had maximum sustained winds of 50 mph and was moving north-northwest at 8 mph.

    A hurricane warning was in effect for Haiti, the southeastern Bahamas, the Turks and Caicos Islands and the Cuban province of Guantanamo. A tropical storm warning was issued for Jamaica.

    'Dangerous' storm surge

    The NHC said the storm by midday had turned north-northeast and increased its forward speed.

    "On the forecast track the center will pass near Jamaica or Haiti tonight, near or over extreme eastern Cuba Friday and near or over the southeastern Bahamas late Friday," the NHC said.

    It added that "some strengthening" was predicted, with tropical storm-force winds now extending up to 85 miles from the center. Hurricane conditions were expected within the areas affected by the hurricane warning by late Thursday or early Friday.

    A "dangerous" storm surge was also predicted to raise sea levels from one to three feet above normal tide levels in areas where there are onshore winds, the NHC said.

    "The surge will be accompanied by large and destructive waves," it added.

    Tomas was forecast to bring five to 10 inches of rain to "much of Haiti and the Dominican Republic ... with possible isolated maximum amounts of 15 inches," the NHC warned, with one to three inches possible over Jamaica.

    "These rains could cause life-threatening flash floods and mud slides over mountainous terrain," it said.

    Three to six inches of rain were also possible over the southeastern Bahamas and the Turks and Caicos Islands.

    The U.N. also fears that Tomas will worsen a cholera epidemic that has already killed 442 people.

    "The biggest fear is people being caught by high waters and the potential spread of cholera," said Nigel Fisher, the U.N. humanitarian coordinator. "People should (not) be under the misapprehension that it (the epidemic) is under control. The cholera epidemic is likely to spread."

    The outbreak of the diarrheal disease has triggered another national emergency in the Western Hemisphere's poorest nation.

    The storm comes as Haiti, a deforested and mountainous land vulnerable to flash floods and mudslides, is still struggling to recover from the Jan. 12 earthquake that killed more than a quarter of a million people.

    Tomas has a terrifying potential to add to the country's misery. It hit the Caribbean's eastern islands as a hurricane four days ago, killing at least five people in St. Lucia before weakening.


    The worst fear is a hurricane-strength storm that hits multiple regions simultaneously, overwhelming the capacity of the government and the aid community to cope, Fisher said.

    "The big challenge is saving lives. If the hurricane is so huge that all over the country is hit severely ... we will really be stretched and we will have to make difficult choices about where to put scarce assets," he said.


    Evacuations in Jamaica

    In Jamaica, authorities were preparing shelters and urging people to evacuate from low-lying and flood-prone areas.

    Jamaican soldiers would evacuate hundreds of people in the island's eastern region Thursday and move them into emergency shelters ahead of the storm, Information Minister Daryl Vaz said.


    "We will be going all out to make good sense prevail," he said at a news conference Wednesday.

    Most of the people who will be evacuated are squatters living along unstable gullies that often flood during heavy rainstorms.

    Kareen Bennett, a forecaster with Jamaica's Meteorological Service, said heavy rains will lash the eastern region by Friday morning.

    Jamaica is still struggling to recuperate from floods unleashed by Tropical Storm Nicole in late September that killed at least 13 people and caused an estimated $125 million in damage.

    People who are still using boats to move about in the island's rural western regions also will be moved to shelters, said Ronald Jackson, of the emergency management office.

    from msnabc news
     
  7. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
    Tropical Storm Brings Heavy Rains to Haiti

    Heavy rains are battering Haiti in what could be the worst storm to hit the island since the January earthquake. Forecasters say Tropical Storm Tomas has gained hurricane strength and will pass through western Haiti sometime today.

    There are fears the rains could trigger massive flooding, potentially spreading a cholera outbreak that has already killed over 440 people. The Haitian government has ordered the voluntary evacuation of camps for earthquake survivors in low-lying areas, but many have nowhere to go. On Thursday, Bill Read of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration said the storm could maintain hurricane strength before making landfall.

    Bill Read: "The next thirty-six hours are the primary threat to the area there. We’re forecasting winds to tropical storm force, possibly reaching hurricane force if Tomas intensifies as it goes through there, but the predominant threat is the heavy rain."

    www.democracynow.org
     
  8. Ankhur

    Ankhur Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Oct 4, 2009
    Messages:
    14,710
    Likes Received:
    3,006
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    owner of various real estate concerns
    Location:
    Brooklyn
    Ratings:
    +3,014
    Hurricane Could Worsen Cholera Epidemic in Haiti

    Haiti’s President René Préval is warning that flooding caused by Hurricane Tomas could increase the spread of a deadly cholera epidemic. The outbreak has already killed 500 Haitians and sickened more than 7,000. Hurricane Tomas skirted Haiti on Friday, flooding some coastal towns, forcing thousands from their homes and soaking camps for displaced people in the capital Port-au-Prince with rain.



    www.democracynow.org
     
Loading...