Black People : HOW TO HIDE SOMETHING FROM A BLACK MAN...

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by Isaiah, Sep 17, 2004.

  1. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Put it in a book...(smile!)

    Does this nasty old sterotype still prevail today??? How many of us are really reading substantive historical texts??? What's interesting is that African Scholars are writting so many fantastic books, books that are winning awards for the information they're divulging, and the bookstores are filled to the brim with some badass stuff...(smile!)

    But is y'all reading this stuff??? Or will these scholars die broke??? Is yall even reading these websites that are posted up in here???

    What is the ONE book that has had a major impact on your lives??? Care to share???

    Peace!
    isaiah
     
  2. We

    We Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    At The Hands of Persons Unknown - Philip Dray


    That book for me is:

    At The Hand of Persons Unknown: The Lynching of Black America - Philip Dray

    This book took me through a wide range of feelings and emotions. There were times when I had to put the book down because I was on the verge of tears after reading some of the detailed and unflinching accounts.. I was nearly overwhelmed with feelings of shock and revulsion. (I will never forget Mary Turner, Sam Hose, Thomas Moss, or Claude Neal). You will find yourself reading at times, as I did, with open-mouthed horror. Yet the book is not merely a compilation of statistics and graphic accounts of lynching. It is a powerfully written comprehensive examination of the shameful tragedy.

    I was amused by the pseudo-scientific theories put forth by the “so-called intellectuals” that reinforced and comforted Whites in their racist beliefs and practices.

    I was amazed by the lengths to which Whites sought to undermine Black advances and maintain a strict caste system at all costs. The “solidarity in the name of white supremacy” and the institutionalized racism allowed white mobs to terrorize Blacks.

    I was ashamed that I was not aware. I found myself saying thing like “I DID NOT KNOW!”, “How can I just be learning of this?”, “How could I, a college-educated Black man, not know of the anti-lynching crusade of Ida B. Wells?” Before reading this book I didn’t know what lynching was. I viewed lynching as an anomaly, a frenzied group of vigilantes carrying out a clandestine assassination of a Black man. I now understand lynching as an American tradition, a systemized, institutionalized reign of terror that was used to maintain the power Whites had over Blacks and to keep Blacks fearful and forestall Black progress. For decades lynching was a constant source of intimidation to all Blacks and a constant reminder of their defenselessness.

    I was frightened to learn that this was allowed to happen within in this country under the color of local, state, and federal law! In this “so-called civilized” society humans were routinely being burned at the stake in front of a throng of thousands. The hardest part came for me when I started to reconcile the timeline within my own family history and realized that my grandfather’s parents were alive during the height of the lynching, when, it was estimated, 2 -5 Blacks were lynched per week!

    I'm still pondering several questions. How did we survive? When did it stop? It is clear that the spirit of lynching lives on. (Rodney King, Yusef Hawkins, Amadou Diallo, James Byrd Jr.) If this phenomenon were to resurface today, what would we do to counter it?
    Can we depend on the collective white consciousness? How about our own political influence? Or perhaps we could look to our leaders, those, who of course, have to yet pass the color line and disappeared into the white majority.

    I was motivated to share what I learned. This book was important to me on many different levels. It reinforced my attitudes towards white women. It strengthened my resolve to ensure I exercise my right to vote. It introduced me to heroes. Men and women like Ida B. Wells, William Monroe Trotter, James Weldon Johnson, and Walter White.


    Every year I purchase three copies of three books to give as gifts. This is one of the three.

    I highly recommend it to everyone.


    Peace,
    Lazarus

    sonsofthediaspora.org
     
  3. KWABENA

    KWABENA STAFF STAFF

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    Hey Lazarus!

    I just want to introduce myself to you. I am Cedric Denson, one of the brothas up in the Destee house! I just want to tell you that as of when you signed on, you have been added to the Best Family of the Web! We are all glad that you are here. Here we have plenty of knowledge to learn, people to talk to (especially when you need advice) and some of the most inspiring people on the web. We all help each other, so feel at home while you are here, and never be afraid to speak your mind as long as you are in the house! Check out some poetry, read some columns, and do whatever. Have fun, learn plenty, and I look forward to reading more of your posts in the future!

    Cedric Denson
     
  4. toylin

    toylin Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Aww, shoot. ONE book? Let me get back to you on that. I have to narrow my list down from about 20....

    2 of my absolute favorites (besides the Bible, the Qu'ran and the Kebra Nagst)

    The Lies My Teacher Told Me by..... can't think of the author right now..
    Early America Revisted by Ivan Van Sertima
     
  5. Isaiah

    Isaiah Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Brother Lazurus, helluva review!(smile!)

    I read this book, as well, in 2003, and it had a powerful impact on me, too... I had read Leon Litwack's Trouble in Mind, and Dr. Neil McMullen's book on Black Mississippians called Dark Journey, and I guess I got accustomed to the stories of incredible brutality inflicted on African Americans... Accustomed to the extent that I was like becoming numb by the time I got to Dray... Of course, "numb" is that feeling you get when you're frostbitten, and it is very painful... That is the kind of numbness I am talking about here...

    Toylin, I can dig it, sista(smile!) Hope you aint taunting a brother waving them 20 books around like dat???(smile!)

    I would have to say the one single book of the few I've read in this life, would be The Autobiography of Malcolm X... It is so inspirational, so powerful and moving for a young mind, especially, that I have given it to all of my children to read... So many people have echoed my sentiments about this American classic... Even White folks have told me that they've never been more moved by a person's autobiography AS Malcolm's...

    Peace!
    Isaiah
     
  6. Nubian1Princess

    Nubian1Princess Member MEMBER

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    Only one ?!?!?!

    Well I can't narrow it down to one because life is full of change and during my short life I have gone through many changes. There are certain books that mean many different things to me in different areas of my life. Different periods of AWAKENINGS.

    5th Grade, Ultimate Favorite - The Autobiography of Malcolm X

    7th Grade, This book opened me up to a specific love of literature
    I never outgrew. - Their Eyes Were Watching God, Zora Neale Hurston

    12th Grade / Freshman Year of College, This book really opened my eyes to the falsification of the education given in public schools and colleges in the U.S. After reading this book and many similar to it I had a lot of debates with my Humaities' Professors. - Stolen Legacy: Greek Philosophy is Stolen Egyptian Philosophy, George G.M. James

    Freshman Year, This book really made me take a look at
    my views on Beauty. - Blacks in Antiquity, Frank M. Snowden, Jr.

    Sophomore Year, Isaiah spoke of becoming numb after reading about the treatment of our ancestors. By the time I got to these two books I was numb as well. However, I must say that these books are more than words. They include photos as well.
    - Without Sanctuary: Lynching Photography in America
    - Confederate Currency: The Color of Money (Images of Slavery in Confederate and Souther States Currency), John W. Jones & Gretchen Barbatsis


    One of my latest favorites. This book brought tears to my eyes. - The Street, Ann Petry.
     
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