Black People : How the Native Americans got Their Reparations

Discussion in 'Black People Open Forum' started by river, Aug 5, 2008.

  1. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    6,458
    Likes Received:
    1,282
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Author
    Location:
    Where the Niger meets the Nile
    Ratings:
    +1,290
    They are divided up into dozens of tribes each one with it's own culture and language so it wasn't their monolithic unity. To my knowledge they don't have a lot of money so it wasn't that they pulled strings. There aren't even a whole lot of them compared to the number of African Americans so it wasn't strength in numbers.

    What then was it?

    Why do we feel we need stuff they didn't have before we can get reparations?
     
  2. SPEAKFREEDOMnet

    SPEAKFREEDOMnet Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Mar 20, 2008
    Messages:
    284
    Likes Received:
    147
    Ratings:
    +147
    some answers to part of your questions

    "Native Americans have leveled the odds in learning to behave like any other special interest group through putting themselves first and not depending on the federal government to always act in their best interest. The same federal government that would promote and protect them, also took their land, generously gave them reservations, and would also intervene as soon as they demonstrated intelligence of self-sufficiency that surpassed control of their regulations." full article
    Exactly what reparations are you referring to Sistah River?

    Uhuru!(freedom)
     
  3. Jahari Kavi

    Jahari Kavi Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Messages:
    1,571
    Likes Received:
    510
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Self Development
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Ratings:
    +523
    i hear of "certain" reparations they get (certain scholarships exist), but whatever they are they will never amount to the cost of europeans destroying their civilization....
     
  4. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    6,458
    Likes Received:
    1,282
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Author
    Location:
    Where the Niger meets the Nile
    Ratings:
    +1,290
    I raise this question because the sentiment seems to be like hey since they got theirs so we ought to get ours. Of course what the arrangement generally referred to as reparations for the Native Americans amounts to is someone invading your home, killing most of the folks in your house then to kill you with what they call kindness they partition off a corner in one bedroom and tell you this is yours. So now you are to be satisfied that they "respect" a corner of what used to be your house. As brotha oldsoul has pointed out the root of the word reparations is repair. The u.s. has not begun to repair the damage they have done to the Native Americans, yet it is assumed that what they got constitutes reparations. It's certainly more than what we got.

    So maybe the answer is that they got what they got because they accepted this convenient way for the government to assuage its guilt without really doing anything as opposed to holding out for something substantial and winding up with nothing.

    I saw MadSkills thread after I posted this one. I can't call Obama a sell out for opposing reparations when we still don't have a clear understanding of what reparations actually refers to. It's got to refer to more than what the Native Americans got and it's got to refer to more than a check in every African-American mailbox. In fact, I see that as a trick. Offering to pay reparations in cash dollars at this time would be a convenient way for the government to dispose of the dollar as the country makes the transition to the Amero They "pay"us a trillion worthless dollars. Then we will no longer be able to demand reparations because in the government's eyes we have been paid. Not the government's fault that no one deals in dollars anymore.
     
  5. truetothecause

    truetothecause Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Feb 26, 2007
    Messages:
    5,447
    Likes Received:
    840
    Occupation:
    The~rapist
    Location:
    In the fantasy of Afreekan Unity
    Ratings:
    +843
    Greetings SiS River...

    I find these comments quite interesting as I certainly recall this conversation and that you were part of it.

    During that discussion, I KNOW that I, Brother's Omo and Mazimtaim, spoke of Reparations being much more that a "check in every African American mailbox".
    I am also CERTAIN that I have mentioned time and again that "Reparations" at the core, means "to repair".

    M.E.
    :hearts2:
     
  6. Jahari Kavi

    Jahari Kavi Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Feb 12, 2008
    Messages:
    1,571
    Likes Received:
    510
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Self Development
    Location:
    Houston, Texas
    Ratings:
    +523
    I don't think Obama is a sellout, but I found it funny how after he mentioned he was against reparations he spoke of things such as education which is exactly what people who push reparations include in their ideology of what reparations should consist of. Most of the reparation ideas I here from various African scholars speak of more than just a check. Most ignorant white folks just come to the conclusion that reparations means just money, when it is far from the truth....
     
  7. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    6,458
    Likes Received:
    1,282
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Author
    Location:
    Where the Niger meets the Nile
    Ratings:
    +1,290
    Yes, I have read your posts sister true2 and Jahari and I know that you both have a clear understanding of what is needed. But there are some here (don't ask me to name names unless you really and truly want me to because I will) who indicate they want a check, And you are right Jahari many whites equate reparations with money because in the court room that's what it amounts to. For many it is equated with paying damages. To use Ra Un Nefer Amen's description of love it is "a label slapped onto an empty bottle with magic properties." It is magic because anything can be put into the empty bottle and people will look at the label and go waay thinking they know what's in the bottle. If we really want to work towards a solution we need to stop arguing and castigating one another over the use of the label and focus on what's being put into the bottle.. Knowamsane?

    While I am not ready to reject Obama wholesale, I strongly disagree with his solution. The offer of government programs shows a decided dearth of creativity. It just doesn't display the kind of out of the box thinking that needs to be applied to the problems we face. I mean we've been here and done that. During the sixties and seventies there was a plethora of government programs which managed to be both invasive and evasive, and instead of empowering us made us more dependent on a system of oppression and injustice. Public housing projects, free lunches, free community clinics, integration C.E.T.A., we had all that crap and it did more to disrupt, damage and destroy the Black family than slavery and Jim Crow put together.

    I also disagree with the idea of categorizing the problems we face as special interest group demands. Obama has built an image as an unifier bringing folks together but if unifying as Americans means the problems of police brutality, gentrification, Black men being locked out of the job market, Koreans receiving subsidies to drive Black business out of our communities, subprime loans etc. if it means these things will be trivialized and unaddressed then we don't need that. As someone pointed out McCain is not going to help us at all. But maybe through letter writing we can make Obama see that it's possible to unite people in a way that addresses rather than dismisses the needs of the individual or portion of society even if those needs aren't shared by the whole society. I am willing to give him the benefit of the doubt and take on the responsibility to let him know that telling Black men to pull up their pants and get a job does not adequately address our problems.
     
  8. Blackbird

    Blackbird Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jan 31, 2004
    Messages:
    3,972
    Likes Received:
    1,819
    Gender:
    Male
    Occupation:
    Professional Hitman
    Location:
    Da Desert, literally
    Ratings:
    +1,820
    Peace!

    As someone of mixed Black/First Nation parentage, I can state that many First Nation people still live in squalor, waiting on the IHS to send money to their respective tribal clinics and the Energy Department, in addition to the BIA (Bureau of Indian Affairs), to approve enough in their budget to provide adequate vouchers for their heating expenses. Many of the groups who were able to come up, per se, did so for a variety of reasons: oil, land trusts, coal, and treaty payments to name a few. Some industrious groups were able to parley those stipends and dividends into casinos, international contracts and resorts. The Comanche Nation has four casinos: Comanche Nation Casino, Comanche Red River Casino, Comanche Star Casino and Comanche Spur Casino that exist to support the interests of members of the nation.

    Another thing the First Nation people had as leverage was the fictitional concept of "sovereignty" fueled by so-called American guilt. We don't have that. The reason the "red" folks have it is mainly due to perspective and decision of greatest threat. All attempts are aimed to keep us as neutralized as possible and when you are playing a game where the rules are written and rewritten by your rival, you must come up with ingenious ways of countering and then going on the offensive. We need to write our own rules, but first we must come to identify with our goal is, what our strategy will be to achieve that goal and constantly revise to accomodation shifting of factors. We have yet to come to a consensus and perhaps that may be the beauty and advantage of the First Nations fragmentation. Each group work its own course out for itself, negotiate its own terms and then convene at a National Convention instead of seeking some national overall platform that doesn't tolerate disuniformity of purpose yet fails to articulate any feasible and achievable objective. Being able to have the flexibility and efficiency to operate in smaller groups may be advantageous for us and could possible fly in the face of conventional adage of strength in numbers. But whatever we decide, we must be able to codify and culturalize our aims and objectives like the Jews.



    Blackbird
     
  9. river

    river Watch Her Flow MEMBER

    Country:
    United States
    Joined:
    Mar 22, 2004
    Messages:
    6,458
    Likes Received:
    1,282
    Gender:
    Female
    Occupation:
    Author
    Location:
    Where the Niger meets the Nile
    Ratings:
    +1,290
    Hey Blackbird,

    I like what you're saying here. Even while whites preach the gospel of strength in numbers they don't practice it. The Catholics hate the protestants, The English hate the Irish. Brunettes hate blondes. Anglos plot against Saxons. But despite all these differences, in the face of the Black man they know only one thing: We are white.

    We too can be just as diverse and fragmented as we are with the one unifying understanding of what we shae in common.

    What you describe is so important. Those who wait passively for the government to give them something live in squalor. Those who take a proactive courrse are empowered and have at least something to show.
     
  10. Zulile

    Zulile Well-Known Member MEMBER

    Joined:
    Jun 24, 2007
    Messages:
    3,284
    Likes Received:
    100
    Occupation:
    HR/Finance
    Ratings:
    +103
    just fyi - in the news today...

    Court Rules US Owes Native Americans $455M for Land Drilling

    A federal judge has ruled the US government owes a group of Native Americans more than $400 million for unpaid royalties on drilling for oil and gas. The $455 million judgment is a fraction of the $47 billion the Natives are seeking. The case marks largest-ever class-action lawsuit against the US government. The suit seeks to force the government to account for all royalties due individual Native Americans since 1887 on seized lands. Plaintiffs say they are considering an appeal.

    http://www.democracynow.org/2008/8/8/headlines
     
Loading...