Pan Africanism : How Does the Afrikan world view Ktrina???

Discussion in 'Black History - Culture - Panafricanism' started by Therious, Sep 5, 2005.

  1. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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    hOW HAS hURICAN KATRINA BEEN PRESENTED IN AFRICA THE CARRIBEAN, S. AMERICA ECT? IM SURE THEY ARE BOMBARDED WITH CNN AND KKK T.V. AS WELL.

    one love
     
  2. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    That is an excellent question brother Therious. Hopefully some of our African members like Fanymambo, AtomicAngel, or Militant can answer for us.
     
  3. Therious

    Therious Banned MEMBER

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    Yes i would like to know what the mood is of our brothers and sisters in the Mutha Land, caribean, S. America,Canada, Europe ect!! Are they talking about the fact the U.S. let African peoples(AS WELL AS CITIZENS OF OTHER RACES BUT THE VAST MAJORITY WERE AFRIKAN AMERICAN) suffer and , Die for four days? Are they influenced by the fabricated and exagerated stories of crime ? Do they realize the whites gave the permission for marshall law, the murders of desperate people searching for food and supplies. Do they know people have reported blacks being murderred by police and national guard?
     
  4. Wisdom7

    Wisdom7 Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I bet the media is portraying how much they've come to the "aide" of our people. Same slant they're trying to create here, But I would love to know as well
     
  5. Riada

    Riada Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    It would be good if more Africans could come on this board and openly and honestly dialogue with some of y’all. Many of them in the motherland and here consider the USA as being next to heaven. You should hear some of them talk about how this is the greatest country in the world, though some do acknowledge that there are some problems. Compared to the way some of their governments treat them, most of them here that I mingle with do not see what’s happening in NO as being that bad because they see how this government, at least, is responding under pressure. Remember, in most African countries, freedom of the press doesn’t exist nearly at all, except on paper. There is next to no pressure put on the head honchos there because anyone who is too critical of the president or other big dogs is stomped down or stomped out one way or the other and FAST.

    A lot of Africans do everything imaginable to get here and stay here. They constantly compare notes about what will work and what won't. Since I associate with a lot of them and I am an American, some of them are constantly trying to get me to help in this or that way (write a letter of sponsorship, help a man or woman to find an American to marry so they can get a green card here, send money to help out this or that one’s sick relatives, one guy even wanted me to fly to Africa and show my American face to expedite getting a relative here, etc.) In other words, many of them think AAs are so blessed to be here and say that AAs have all of these opportunities to get an education, start businesses, and don’t have to worry about being deported, which is their greatest fear here. They simply don't understand why some of us don't grab these opportunities.

    Though the ones here know we are their people, there is a wide gulf in our experiences and theirs. The Africans here, of course, know about slavery, but they don’t understand its residual effects on AAs. Colonization was a terrible experience for them but it was very different from slavery in major ways.

    And the fact is that the vast majority of Africans on the continent don’t even know AAs exist.
     
  6. panafrica

    panafrica Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    I don't know if I believe that the vast majority of African on the continent aren't aware that African Americans exist. However, you are right in saying that many Africans believe that the USA is the greatest country in the world. Many are disappointed after coming here, because they live worst in America than they did in Africa. Some come to the US, and do extremely well. The sad reality is that many Africans live with governments that do not represent the interest of the people (they are more concerned with exploiting resources for European markets). Our reality is that we also live with a government that does not represent the interest of black people. That much we have in common.
     
  7. fanyamambo

    fanyamambo Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Yes we are getting news about the situation in New Orleans. I and the people I interact with are all saddened by it. I must admit that Africa is no stranger to this sort of or similar devastation, so we may not be all that shocked by images etc. There has however been a lot of questions raised about especially the rapes that have been reported. Are these fabricated/exaggerated? We are very much of the opinion that had the affected population been predominantly privileged whites government action would have been immediate. (Then again government inaction is also no stranger to most of us) So the racist realities don't go unnoticed. In fact in my office right now there is an e mail circulating about the media reports of blacks "looting" and whites "finding". It is causing much anger. I have also been reading the other thread from that supposed black website. It is infuriating and in fact I apologize for not reacting to any of the threads on this issue - I hope i have not come off as indifferent.
     
  8. Riada

    Riada Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    My claim that most Africans don’t know AAs exist is a sad one for me to believe too, but it is based on the fact that most Africans are not literate and thus do not know that much about what is happening in other parts of the world, except for what they’re told. I was told this by some of the Africans here. Coupled with all of the difficulties of dealing with their own life and death issues on a day to day basis, many of them, like a lot of people here and everywhere, don’t have time for much interest in what’s happening with other people far away.

    Of course the formally educated, well-travelled, and better employed ones know about us because of their interest in world affairs and the USA, but they represent a small number of the continental African population. Probably hip-hop music will spread the knowledge of our existence to more of Africa and the rest of the world than anything else.
     
  9. SAMURAI36

    SAMURAI36 Banned MEMBER

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    You continue to make alot of broad statements, that do not necessarily reflect the whole of the African mindset.

    More opinions based on myopia, and little more.

    :rolleyes:
     
  10. militant

    militant Well-Known Member MEMBER

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    Militant here. It really depends on where you look like and the make up of the society. I mean a place like south africa will cover the issue as an american problem with little mention on the associated injustices of the event, given that they are in a fragile society. Case in point, www.iol.co.za, which is a white dominated media, at some point did not even feature the tragedy on any news items, rather chosing to headline with Mugabe declaring himself the new hitler. As for other countries in Africa, I will like to concentrate mostly on the countries I know the most. Now the views are just as varied as within the african american community. from the extreme conservative views to the more liberal views. I have been on sites battling out a few ignorant bad eggs. What I post are the more positive views and realistic views.
    Katrina And Lessons for Humanity

    Kenya:

    The Nation (Nairobi)

    4 Septembre 2005
    Publié sur le web le 5 Septembre 2005

    Mwende Mwinzi /Talking Point
    Nairobi

    Over the years, several things have prompted me to question certain American Government administrations and their treatment of minority communities, particularly those of African descent. It is not that not that these governments have not done any good.

    Over time, and as a result of civil rights movements supported by both white and black communities in the US, remarkable progress by respective federal, state and local administrations has been achieved. Many examples exist most notably Affirmative Action which, in particular, has afforded African-Americans the education and training opportunities previously denied. For this, the US has prominent leaders such as Colin Powell, Condoleeza Rice and Barack Obama, among others who have risen to the highest level of leadership, to show for it.


    Notwithstanding this, there are many concerned not only that such actions are of token use but that they do not override the overall issues marginalising this community and the developing world. Like many worldwide, I spent most of this week in front of a television set where I was glued to images of African-Americans suffering unnecessarily. Should the world not pay mind to this and, in a broader sense, its general implications? "We are out here like animals!" cried one victim.

    It is uncertain why the US responded to Hurricane Katrina in the manner it did. However, its message was clear - this administration would rather mobilise resources for war than natural justice. Is this what the American influence should be about - power and short geo-political interests? It is unlikely. The American people, it would appear, are equally disgusted by this response and, will hopefully recognise now that something has gone desperately array. The great American might should be used for the goodness of humanity and not its neglect.

    As President Bush was touring the hurricane zones, I could not help but think of the disconnect between his efforts at this and those his administration has put towards promoting democracy. Are there lessons that we, as Africans, can learn from this?

    The recent natural disasters that we have all witnessed, going back to the Tsunami and most recently to Hurricane Katrina, are of overwhelming concern particularly because they appear to be connected to the changing global climatic environments. There are many who believe that the US should have, as a global leader, provided leadership and, in a timely manner, signed the Kyoto Protocol which addressed itself to this global survival issue.

    Having endured visuals of abandoned corpses rotting; naked and starving babies crying out for food and elderly people slowly dying these past few months, I am sure that the American people would support this position. As I sit in Nairobi writing this, I am reminded by all around me, that we are enduring one of the longest coldest periods we have ever had under the equator while at the same time, Katrina havoc is happening in the American Atlantic region.

    We have historically relied on the West for aid and support but I am persuaded that we owe it to ourselves to begin an evaluation of our strengths and weaknesses in the global make-up. Rather than continuing to pan-handling and rely on the outside, we need to have a collective and united global voice to control and trade our resources across borders. We owe it to our heritage and that of our children within the context of global humanity.

    Unless this is wrong, it is apparent that a new political order is emerging. And according to some positions, it is based on the New World Order which is founded on the existing conflicts within the Christian and Islamic civilisations. As the Far East emerges as a global competitor, it is important that African countries such as Kenya evaluate their alliances. Should we veer towards to West which has historically aided our development or should we, as we seem to be, working on trade alliances with the Far East? The answer is self-evident.

    Liens Pertinents

    Afrique de l'Est
    USA, Canada et Afrique
    Kenya



    From the Second World War and the rise of socialism and communism, the US and the original Western world, assumed the leadership of the Western world which was declared as democracy. Three ideologies ensued; the Western world; the socialist Marxist world and the Third World. Following the fall of the Berlin Wall, the world remained under the dominance of the US. The world has witnessed America flex her muscles. We have also experienced some of her kindness. But as is increasingly obvious, she bears less of a human face.

    Kenya has always been a friend to the US and so, though I represent myself, I would like to advise that America seek respect and honour rather than fear. The world wants a custodian of humanity however this week among others, they failed.



    Nigeria:
    http://nigeriaworld.com/articles/2005/sep/051.html
    Benjamin U. Nwosu Monday, September 5, 2005
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    USA

    ANNOUNCE THIS ARTICLE TO YOUR FRIENDS


    THE AMERICAN REFUGEES


    --------------------------------------------------------------------------------

    f it took the United States Homeland Security Department four days to respond to the aftermath of Hurricane Katerina in the Gulf States, then we can easily conclude that the so called Homeland Security Department is not ready and able to defend the continental United States of America in the event of an urban terrorist attack.




    This tragic hurricane is the closest test to the 'real thing' for this unwieldy nascent Federal department. Given the much televised terrorist-readiness drills in various cities of this country, we had expected a whirlwind of activities after Katrina made landfall.

    We had expected a coordinated air, land and sea operations to contain the devastating effect of this hurricane.

    We had expected to see National Guard officers being parachuted into the New Orleans Convention Center and the SuperDome.

    We had expected to see armadas, flotillas, and submarines on the Gulf of Mexico and the Mississippi River.

    We had expected to see hovercrafts maneuvering on land and water, evacuating victims.

    We had expected President Bush to take charge of the situation ab initio and marshal the awesome power of the US military.

    We did not expect the levee to break and flood the city like a bathtub.

    Instead, what we saw was the abandonment of masses of American citizens in their hours of greatest need. We watched as masses of poor Americans, trapped in a flooded giant bathtub called New Orleans, were left to fend for themselves. We saw corpses floating through the streets as people waded across neck-deep waters. Suddenly, the typical Third World disaster scenario unfolded in one of the historic cities in America.

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    Then members of the American media entered the fray, and chose to concentrate on chaff over substance. They labeled their fellow citizens refugees, not evacuees. And while people were debating whether the hurricane victims were refugees or evacuees, the media played the race card. An African American man wading in chest deep water with supplies was labeled a looter, while two white folks wading in the same water with supplies were labeled as looking for food. That set off a tsunami in the blogging world. And then the right wing media introduced scare tactics.

    They focused exclusively on the looting in the city in the first two days following the hurricane, while neglecting the frail and weak human beings who were dropping dead like flies all across the Gulf coast. It gladdened their hearts to beam images of looters in Wal Mart, rather than use their immense power to rouse the Federal government from sleep. This is not a defense for looters, but a glimpse at the priorities of the American media during a crisis. Their assessment of the danger and violence in New Orleans just after the hurricane hit was overblown, and hampered the pace of the rescue effort. Some of the reports of shooting and carnage were later debunked.

    One of the media networks, NBC, got a dose of reality yesterday when rapper Kanye West, in an act or rare courage in America, veered off his scripted message on a national television fund raiser and delivered a scathing condemnation of relief effort and President Bush. Right now, NBC is scrambling to distance itself from the outspoken rapper. It has censored the later part of Kanye West's remarks from its West Coast broadcast. The Los Angeles Times has slammed this censorship as an act of cowardice by NBC. But the media networks have stopped beaming images of looters since Kanye West's remarks. The major American media outlets are just business entities, with little interest in objective reporting. Granted, a few of them brought the horrors of the victims to our living rooms, but most of them focused on mundane topics to score cheap points while people perished.

    What unfolded before the world in New Orleans was one of America's best kept secrets: the sequestered and faceless masses of poor citizens unknown to the outside world. What the world saw was the richest nation on earth dressed down to its social rubric, unmasking its partitions along racial and class lines. This is a big blow to the dapper image the American government projects around the globe. Suddenly, the world learnt that though America donates huge amounts of money and material to disaster relief efforts around the world, some of its citizens could not afford transportation to escape an on-coming hurricane.

    Hurricane Katerina will have far reaching consequences for the American society and to the world in general. The social and economic consequences of this hurricane will linger for a long time to come. The issues of race and class have bubbled to the surface once more. The slow response of the Federal government to this disaster has been blamed on many factors ranging from incompetent Federal ministers, to unwieldy Federal agencies and plain government insensitivity to the plight of the poorest members of the society. The burden is on the Federal government to prove otherwise. We are waiting for the resignations.

    The ripples from the aftermath of this hurricane will erode support for the Iraq war and energize the anti-war campaign which got a shot in the arm when Cindy Sheehan decided to pitch a protest camp outside President Bush's Crawford ranch. There appears to be a consensus in America that the Iraq war has siphoned much needed men and material from the country. There is a story making rounds that the budget for the protection of New Orleans was cut by the Federal government to facilitate the prosecution of the Iraq war. Hurricane Katrina has shown that there is a price to pay for such decision. This will haunt Republican politicians in battleground states in the coming elections.

    As Africans in the United States, we are aware of thousands of young African queuing up at various United States embassies across the African continent in the hope of securing a visa to come and live in America. Some of them believe that dollars grow on trees in America, and you just have to reach out and pluck as much as you need. I hope the ugly scenario of marooned black faces in New Orleans is an eye opener to the reality of the American experience.

    The aftermath of Hurricane Katerina beamed a searchlight on the underbelly of the American society and the world caught a glimpse of America's best kept secret: the hordes of desperately poor citizens living way below the poverty line in the wealthiest nation on earth. These are the America's walking dead: those who have been shut out of the great banquet called America.

    South Africa:

    Four South Africans still on Katrina list

    September 05, 2005, 20:00

    Four South Africans are still missing after Hurricane Katrina struck the United States city of New Orleans last week, the department of foreign affairs said.

    "Over the weekend a total of 17 South Africans had been put on the emergency management system list. By today, 13 of these were successfully contacted, or have made contact with their families," said Ronnie Mamoepa, foreign affairs spokesperson.

    Only four remained on the list, said Mamoepa. He said the South African Embassy in Washington was in constant touch with the United States State Department about citizens in the affected area. The department would continue to liaise with affected families.

    SA plane leaves with aid for New Orleans
    Meanwhile, a South African DC8 cargo aircraft carrying 38 tons of military ration packs for victims of Hurricane Katrina has left for the United States from Britain.

    The aircraft, belonging to African International Airways, was carrying relief aid donated by the British government, the owner of the company, Pat Corbin, said in a statement.
    - Sapa
     
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